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Has Amazon Brought Something New To Healthcare Data Analytics?

Posted on November 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Amazon’s announcement that it was getting into healthcare data analytics didn’t come as a major surprise. It was just a matter of time.

After all, the retail giant has been making noises about its health IT ambitions for a while now, and its super-sneaky 1492 team’s healthcare feints have become common knowledge.

Now, news has broken that its massive hosting division, Amazon Web Services, is offering its Comprehend Medical platform to the healthcare world. And at the risk of being a bit too flip, my reaction is “so?” I think we should all take a breath before we look at this in apocalyptic terms.

First, what does Amazon say we’re looking at here?

Like similar products targeting niches like travel booking and supply-chain management, the company reports, Comprehend Medical uses natural language processing and machine learning to pull together relevant information from unstructured text.

Amazon says Comprehend Medical can pull needed information from physician notes, patient health records and clinical trial reports, tapping into data on patient conditions and medication dosage, strength and frequency.

The e-retailer says that users can access the platform through a straightforward API call, accessing Amazon’s machine learning expertise without having to do their own development or train models of their own. Use cases it suggests include medical cohort analysis, clinical decision support and improving medical coding to tighten up revenue cycle management.

Comprehend Medical customers will be charged a fee each month based on the amount of text they process each month, either $0.01 per 100-character unit for the NERe API, which extracts entities, entity relationships, entity traits and PHI, or $0.0014 per unit if they use its PHId API, which only supports identifying PHI for data protection.

All good. All fine. Making machine learning capabilities available in a one-off hosting deal — with a vendor many providers already use — can’t be wrong.

Now, let’s look coldly at what Amazon can realistically deliver.

Make no mistake, I understand why people are excited about this announcement. As with Microsoft, Google, Apple and other top tech influencers, Amazon is potentially in the position to change the way things work in the health IT sector. It has all-star brainpower, the experience with diving into new industries and enough capital to buy a second planet for its headquarters. In other words, it could in theory change the healthcare world.

On the other hand, there’s a reason why even IBM’s Watson Health stumbled when it attempted to solve the data analytics puzzle for oncologist. Remember, we’re talking IBM here, the last bastion of corporate power. Also, bear in mind that other insanely well-capitalized, globally-recognized Silicon Valley firms are still biding their time when it comes to this stuff.

Finally, consider that many researchers think NLP is only just beginning to find its place in healthcare, and an uncertain one at that, and that machine learning models are still in their early stages, and you see where I’m headed.

Bottom line, if Google or Microsoft or Epic or Salesforce or Cerner haven’t been able to pull this off yet, I’m skeptical that Amazon has somehow pole-vaulted to the front of the line when it comes to NLP-based mining of medical text. My guess is that this product launch announcement is genuine, but was really issued more as a stake in the ground. Definitely something I would do if I worked there.

New INFRAM Model Creates Healthcare Infrastructure Benchmarks

Posted on November 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During the frenzy that was healthcare organizations rushing to implement EHRs and chase government money, it was amazing to see so many other projects get left behind. One of the biggest areas that got left behind was investments in IT infrastructure. All the budget was going to the EHR and so the infrastructure budgets often got cut. There were some exceptions where upgrades to infrastructure were needed to make the EHR work, but most organizations I know chose to limp along with their current infrastructure and used that money to pay for the EHR.

Given this background, I was quite intrigued by the recent announcement of HIMSS Analytic’s INFRAM (Infrastructure Adoption Model). This new model focuses on a healthcare organization’s infrastructure and whether it’s stable, manageable, and extensible. I like this idea since it’s part of the practical innovation we talk about in our IT Dev Ops category at the EXPO.health Conference. What we’ve found is that many healthcare organizations are looking for infrastructure innovations and the benefits are great.

The INFRAM model has 5 main focus areas:

  • Mobility
  • Security
  • Collaboration
  • Transport
  • Data Center

No doubt these are all areas of concern for any healthcare CIO. Although, I wonder if having all 5 of these in the same model is really the best choice. A healthcare organization might be at a level 6 for secruity, but only at a level 3 for mobility. Maybe that’s just fine for that organization. I guess at the core of this question is whether all of the capabilities of stage 7 are capabilities that are universally needed by all healthcare organizations.

I’m not sure the answer to this, but I think a case can be made that some organizations shouldn’t spend their limited resources to reach stage 7 of the INFRAM benchmark (or even stage 5 for some organizations). If a healthcare organization makes that a priority, it will probably force some purchases that aren’t really needed by the organization. That’s not a great model. If the above 5 focus areas had their own adoption models, then it would avoid some of these issues.

Much like the EMRAM model, the INFRAM model has 7 stages as follows:

STAGE 7
Adaptive And Flexible Network Control With Software Defined Networking; Home-Based Tele-Monitoring; Internet/TV On Demand

STAGE 6
Software Defined Network Automated Validation Of Experience; On-Premise Enterprise/Hybrid Cloud Application And Infrastructure Automation

STAGE 5
Video On Mobile Devices; Location-Based Messaging; Firewall With Advanced Malware Protection; Real-Time Scanning Of Hyperlinks In Email Messages

STAGE 4
Multiparty Video Capabilities; Wireless Coverage Throughout Most Premises; Active/Active High Availability; Remote Access VPN

STAGE 3
Advanced Intrusion Prevention System; Rack/Tower/Blade Server-Based Compute Architecture; End-To-End QoS; Defined Public And Private Cloud Strategy

STAGE 2
Intrusion Detection/Prevention; Informal Security Policy; Disparate Systems Centrally Managed By Multiple Network Management Systems

STAGE 1
Static Network Configurations; Fixed Switch Platform; Active/Standby Failover; LWAP-Only Single Wireless Controller; Ad-Hoc Local Storage Networking; No Data Center Automation

STAGE0
No VPN, Intrusion Detection/Prevention, Security Policy, Data Center Or Compute Architecture

As this new model was announced, I had a chance to talk with Marlon Harvey, Industry Solutions Group Healthcare Architect at Cisco, about the INFRAM model. It was interesting to hear the genesis of the model starting first as an infrastructure maturity model at Cisco and then evolving into the INFRAM model described above. Marlon shared that there had been about 21-24 assessments and 35 organizations involved in developing this maturity model. So, the model is still new, but has had some real world testing by organizations.

I do have some concern about the deep involvement from vendor companies in this model. On the one hand, they have a ton of expertise and experience in what’s out there and what’s possible. On the other hand, they’re definitely interested in pushing out more infrastructure sales. No doubt, HIMSS Analytics is in a challenging position to balance all of this.

That said, a healthcare CIO doesn’t have to be beholden to any model. They can use the model where it applies and leave it behind where it doesn’t. Sure, I love having models like INFRAM and EMRAM to create a goal and a framework for a healthcare organization. There’s real value in having goals and associated recognition as a way to bring a healthcare IT organization together. Plus, benchmarks like these are also beneficial to a CIO trying to convince their board to spend more money on needed infrastructure. So, there’s no doubt some value in good benchmarking and recognition for high achievement. I’ll be interested to see as more CIOs dive into the details if they find that INFRAM is focused on the things they really need to move their organization forward from an infrastructure perspective.

Exec Tells Congress That New Health Data Threats Are Emerging

Posted on June 20, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A senior security executive with a major academic health system has told Congress that in addition to attacks by random attackers, healthcare organizations are facing new threats which are changing the health security landscape.

Erik Decker, chief security and privacy officer with the University of Chicago Medicine, testified on behalf of the Association for Executives in Healthcare Information Security in mid-June. He made his comments in support of the reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act, whose purpose is to improve the U.S. public health and medical preparedness for emergencies.

In his testimony, Decker laid out how the nature of provider and public health preparedness has changed as digital health technology has become the backbone of the industry.

He described how healthcare information use has evolved, explaining to legislators how the digitization of healthcare has created a “hyper-connected” environment in which systems such as EHRs, revenue cycle platforms, imaging and ERP software are linked to specialty applications, the cloud and connected medical devices.

He also told them about the increasing need for healthcare organizations to share data smoothly, and the impact this has had on the healthcare data infrastructure. “There is increasing reliance on these data being available, and confidential, to support these nuanced clinical workflows,” he said. “With the adoption of this technology, the technical ecosystem has exploded in complexity.”

While the emergence of these complex digital health offers many advantages, it has led to a growth in the number and type of cybersecurity problems providers face, Decker noted. New threats he identified include:

* The development of underground markets and exchanges of sensitive information and services such as Hacking-as-a Service
* The emergence of sophisticated hacking groups deploying ransomware
* New cyberattacks by terrorist organizations
* Efforts by nation states to steal intellectual property to create national economic advantages

This led to the key point of his testimony: “We can no longer think of preparedness relative only to natural disasters or pandemics,” Decker said. “It’s imperative that we acknowledge the criticality of cybersecurity threats levied against the nation’s healthcare system.”

To address such problems, Decker suggests, healthcare organizations will need help from the federal government. For example, he pointed out, HHS efforts made a big difference when it jumped in quickly and worked closely with healthcare leaders responding to WannaCry attacks in mid-2017.

Meanwhile, to encourage the healthcare industry to adopt strong cybersecurity practices, it’s important to offer providers some incentives, including a financial subsidy or safe harbors from enforcement actions, he argued.

Making Precision Medicine a Reality with SAP Healthcare and Mercy

Posted on February 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In this Healthcare Scene interview, I sit down with Curtis Dudley and Dr. David Delaney to talk about their precision medicine work at Mercy using SAP HANA to improve quality outcomes and reduce delivery costs using perioperative analytics. We also dive into why Mercy chose to use a third party analytics software instead of their Epic EHR. Plus, we talk about where Mercy and SAP plan to take these healthcare analytics platforms next and how they plan to share the work they’ve done with other hospital systems. We know you’ll enjoy this look into precision medicine at work:

Here are a few more details for our panelists:

  • Curtis Dudley, Vice President of Performance Solutions at Mercy
  • David Delaney, MD is Chief Medical Officer of SAP Public Services and Healthcare Industries
  • John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com

In the “after party” we dove into more of the technical details of what’s required to roll out a healthcare analytics platform. We dug into Mercy’s approach to exporting data from their EHR and other data sources into SAP HANA and when they choose to just store pointers to the data instead of exporting all the data. We also talk about whether healthcare analytics is really available for the smaller health systems or if it really only works for larger health systems.

If you want to learn more about SAP’s work with Mercy hospital system, both Mercy and SAP Healthcare will be at HIMSS 2016.

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member. You can learn more about SAP’s healthcare solutions during #HIMSS16 at Booth #5828.

Talking Genomic Medicine at #CES2016

Posted on January 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was lucky to moderate a panel at the Digital Health Summit at CES 2016. The session was called “Look Who’s Talking: Newborn Genomic Data Enables Precision Medicine” and I was joined by 2 amazing panelists:

  • Andy De, Global Managing Director and General Manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences at Tableau
  • Aaron Black, Director, Informatics, Inova Translational Medicine Institute

It’s amazing to see the work Andy and Aaron are doing with genomic medicine. It’s truly uncharted territory and we’re still discovering what’s going to be possible. However, I think we do a good job looking at some of the things that are reality today in genomic medicine.

Check out all of the healthcare IT conferences we attend throughout the year.

Are There Elements of Healthcare IT That Won’t Eventually Be On the Cloud?

Posted on August 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I came across this video from Dell that looks at the Future of Healthcare and how cloud computing is working to transform healthcare. It’s a marketing video for Dell, but it brings up some interesting points about where healthcare IT is headed:

After watching the video, I asked myself the question that’s the title of this blog post: Are There Elements of Healthcare IT That Won’t Eventually Be On the Cloud?

I think the answer is no. I think it will also take healthcare a while to actually get fully on the cloud. However, it’s happening across every aspect of healthcare IT. Plus, there are going to be a number of healthcare IT innovations in the future that are only going to be cloud based. I think genomics and personalized medicine is the perfect example. Those innovations are going to both require cloud technology to make it a reality.

Chris Riley Interview from eDTC Revolutions: Innovation and Opportunity in EHR

Posted on October 8, 2012 I Written By

Chris shares his overview of Mitochon, an innovative EHR system that enables peer-to-peer connectivity. The first, truly complete ONC-ATCB certified free EHR platform, Mitochon offers a cloud-based solution reflective of how healthcare segments access and consume information at the point of care and beyond. Chris also discusses the importance of privacy and transparency, and how cloud-based systems such as Mitochon can ensure data security and integrity.

 

 

Watch the video.

Meeting the Future Challenges of the NHS: Roland Rott

Posted on July 31, 2012 I Written By

Roland Rott, head of Ultrasound IT explains how software has quickly become the driving force in ultrasound innovation and why cloud computing, social media and mobile technology are creating new paradigms, driving increased efficiency and connectivity among physicians and influencing how doctors and patients interact with each other.

 

 

Watch the video.

Atul Butte at TEDMED 2012: Harnessing the Value of Data and Research

Posted on July 17, 2012 I Written By

I love a good thought provoking video, and TED is always a great place to go if you want to provoke some thought.  In this video from TEDMED 2012, Atul Butte, Chief of Systems Medicine at Stanford University, looks at how outsourced research and the massive amounts of data we have can help speed us through the scientific method, if we ask the right questions.

 

 

Watch the video.

Sibos 2010: Gary Thompson Discusses How CLOUD Can Advance Financial Intelligence

Posted on October 14, 2011 I Written By

CLOUD’s Gary Thompson was honored by the opportunity to be a keynote speaker at SWIFT’s annual global financial conference in Amsterdam in October 2010. He discussed how CLOUD’s vision relates to not only smart data but how reweaving the fabric of the Internet can advance financial intelligence through semantics.

 

 

Watch the video here.