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Scripps Research Translational Institute Partners To Develop AI Applications

Posted on November 2, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

The Scripps Research Translational Institute has agreed to work with graphics processing unit-maker NVIDIA to support the development of AI applications. The partners plan to forge AI and deep learning best practices, tools and infrastructure tailored to supporting the AI application development process.

In collaboration with NVIDIA, Scripps will establish a center of excellence for artificial intelligence in genomics and digital sensors. According to Dr. Eric Topol, the Institute’s founder and director, AI should eventually improve accuracy, efficiency, and workflow in medical practices. This is especially true of the data inputs from sensors and sequencing, he said in an NVIDIA blog item on the subject.

Scripps is already a member of a unique data-driven effort known as the “All of Us Research Program,” which is led by the National Institutes of Health. This program, which collects data on more than 1 million US participants, looks at the intersection of biology, genetics, environment, data science, and computation. If successful, this research will expand the range of conditions that can be treated using precision medicine techniques.

NVIDIA, for its part, is positioned to play an important part in the initial wave of AI application rollouts. The company is a leader in producing performance chipsets popular with those who play high-end, processor-intensive gaming which it has recently applied to other processor intensive projects like blockchain. It now hopes its technology will form the core of systems designed to crunch the high volumes of data used in AI projects.

If NVIDIA can provide hardware that makes high-volume number-crunching less expensive and more efficient, it could establish an early lead in what is likely to be a very lucrative market. Given its focus on graphics processing, the hardware giant could be especially well-suited to dominate rapidly-emerging radiology AI applications.

We can certainly expect to see more partnerships like this file into place over the next year or two. Few if any IT vendors have enough scientific expertise in-house to make important gains in biotech AI, and few providers have enough excess IT talent available to leverage discoveries and data in this arena.

It will be interesting to see what AI applications development approaches emerge from such partnerships. Right now, much AI development and integration is being done on a one-off basis, but it’s likely these projects will become more systematized soon.

Will UnitedHealth’s New Personal Health Record Make An Impact?

Posted on October 26, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Though the idea of a personal health record was a hot thing for a while, it didn’t become the fixture of the healthcare market that pundits had predicted. In fact, as many readers will recall, even deep pockets like Google and Microsoft couldn’t get their users to sign on to their PHRs en masse.

One of the main reasons the PHR model didn’t take is that people simply didn’t want to use them. In fact, at least at the time, the PHR was almost entirely a solution in search of a problem. After all, if a health data power user and patient advocate like myself didn’t want one, what hope did PHR backers have of interesting your average Joe Blow in aggregating their health data online?

Over time, however, the personal health data landscape has changed, with patient records becoming a bit more portable. While consumers still aren’t beating down the doors to get their own PHR, those who are interested in pulling together their medical records electronically have better access to their history.

Not only that, wearables makers like Apple and Fitbit are sweetening the pot, primarily by helping people pull self-generated data into their health record. Arguably, patient-generated data may not be as valuable as traditional records just yet, but consumers are likely to find it more interesting than the jargon-laden text found in provider records.

Given recent developments like these, I wasn’t entirely surprised to learn that UnitedHealth Group is picking up the PHR torch. According to an article in MedCity News, the giant payer plans to launch what sounds like an updated PHR platform next year to its 50 million benefited plan members.

Apparently, on an earnings call last week UnitedHealth CEO Dave Wichmann said that the company will launch a “fully integrated and fully portable individual health record” in 2019. Notably, this is not just a data repository, but rather an interactive tool that “delivers personalized next-best health actions to people and their caregivers.”

The new health record will be based on UnitedHealth’s Rally health and wellness platform, which the insurer picked up when it acquired Audax Health in 2014. The platform, which has 20 million registered users, works to influence members to perform healthy behaviors in exchange for the incentive dollars,

Over time, Wichmann said, UHG intends to build Rally into a platform which collects and distributes “deeply personalized” health information to individual members, MedCity reported. The idea behind this effort is to highlight gaps in care and help patients assess the care that they get.  Wichmann told earnings call listeners that the platform data will be packaged and presented to clinicians in a form similar to that used by existing EHRs.

UHG’s plans here are certainly worth keeping an eye on over the next year or two. I have no doubt that the nation’s largest commercial payer has some idea of how to format data and make it digestible by systems like Cerner and Epic.

But while patients have become a bit more familiar with the benefits of having their health data on hand, we’re not exactly seeing consumers stampede the providers demanding their own health record either, and I’m far from convinced that this effort will win new converts.

My skepticism comes partly from first-hand experience. As a recent UnitedHealth beneficiary, I’ve used the Rally application, and I didn’t find it all that motivating. Honestly, I doubt any online platform will make much of an impact on patient health on its own, as the reasons for many health issues are multifactorial and can’t be resolved by handing one of us a few Rally bucks.

Personal gripes aside, though, the bigger question remains whether consumers think they’ll get something valuable out of using the new UHG tool. As always, you can never count on them coming just because you built it.

AMA Releases Great Guide To Digital Health Implementation

Posted on October 25, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In the past, I’ve been pretty hard on the AMA when it comes to digital health. Last year I gave the organization a particularly hard time when it rolled out its Physician Innovation Network platform, which is designed to help physicians network directly with health tech firms, as it seemed to be breaking little to no ground.

However, to be fair the AMA has been a relatively quiet but solid presence in health IT for quite some time.  Its health IT efforts include cofounding Health2047, which brings together doctors with established health IT companies to help the companies launch services and products, serving as one of four organizations behind mHealth app standards venture Xcertia and managing a student-run biotechnology incubator in collaboration with Sling Health.

But what it hasn’t done so far, at least to date, has been to offer physicians any hands-on guidance on using emerging health IT. Now, at long last, the AMA has taken the plunge, releasing a guide focused on helping physicians roll out digital health technology in their practice. At least this time around, I have to give the organization a high five.

The new guide takes a lifecycle perspective, helping practices work through the digital health implementation process from preparations to rollout to gathering data on the impact of the new technology. In other words, it lays out the process as a feedback loop rather than a discrete event in time, which is smart. And its approach to explaining each step is concise and clean.

One section identifies six straightforward steps for choosing a digital health technology, including identifying a need, defining success early on in the process, making the case for political and financial buy-in, forming the team, evaluating the vendor and executing the vendor contract.

Along the way, it makes the important but often-neglected point that the search should begin by looking at the practice’s challenges, including inefficiencies, staff pain points or patient health and satisfaction problems. “The focus on need will help you avoid the temptation to experiment with new technologies that ultimately will result in tangible improvements,” the guide notes.

Another offers advice on tackling more immediate implementation issues, including steps like designing workflows, preparing the care team and partnering with the patient. This section of the report differs from many of its peers by offering great advice on building workflow around remote patient monitoring-specific requirements, including handling device management, overseeing patient enrollment and interactions, and assuring that coding and billing for remote patient management activities is correct and properly documented.

The guide also walks practices through the stages of final implementation, including the nature of the rollout itself, evaluating the success of the project and scaling up as appropriate. I was particularly impressed by its section on scaling up, given that most of the advice one sees on this subject is generally aimed at giant enterprises rather than typically smaller medical practices. In other words, it’s not that the section said anything astonishing, but rather that it existed at all.

All told, it’s great to see the AMA flexing some of the knowledge it’s always had, particularly given that the report is available at no cost to anyone. Let’s hope to see more of this in the future.

Is FHIR Adoption At A Turning Point, Or Is This Just More Hype?

Posted on October 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last few years, healthcare industry players have continued to experiment with the use of HL7 FHIR to solve key interoperability problems.

Perhaps the most recent efforts to do so is the Da Vinci Project, which brings together a group of payers, health IT vendors, and providers dedicated to fostering value-based care with FHIR. The group has begun work on two test cases, one addressing 30-day medication reconciliation and the other coverage requirements discovery.

This wasn’t big news, as it doesn’t seem to be doing anything that new. In fact, few if any of these projects — of which there have been many — have come close to establishing FHIR firmly established as a standard, much less fostering major change in the healthcare industry.

Now, a new analysis by the ONC suggests that we may finally be on the verge of a FHIR breakthrough.

According to ONC’s research, which looked at how health IT developers used FHIR to meet 2015 Edition certification requirements, roughly 32% of the health IT developers certified are using FHIR Release 2, and nearly 51% of health IT developers seem to be using a version of FHIR combined with OAuth 2.0.

While this may not sound very impressive (and at first glance, it didn’t to me), the certified products issued by the top 10 certified health IT developers serve about 82% of hospitals and 64% of clinicians.

Not only that, big tech companies staking out an expanded position in healthcare are leveraging FHIR 2, the ONC notes. For example, Apple is using a FHIR-based client app as part of its healthcare deployment.  Amazon, Alphabet, and Microsoft are working to establish themselves in the healthcare industry as well, and it seems likely that FHIR-based interoperability will come to play a part in their efforts.

In addition, CMS has shown faith in FHIR as well, investing in FHIR through its Blue Button 2.0,  a standards-based API allowing Medicare beneficiaries to connect their claims data to applications, services, and research programs.

That being said, after citing this progress, the agency concedes that FHIR still has a way to go, from standards development implementation, before it becomes the lingua franca of the industry. In other words, ONC’s definition of “turning point” may be a little different than yours or mine. Have I missed something here?

Look, I don’t like being “that guy,” but how encouraging is this really? By my standards at least, FHIR uptake is relatively modest for such a hot idea. For example, compare FHIR adoption of AI technology or blockchain. In some ways, interoperability may be a harder “get” than blockchain or AI in some ways, but one would think it would be further along if it were completely practical. Maybe I’m just a cynic.

Number Of Health Data Breaches Grew Steadily Over Last Several Years

Posted on October 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

New research has found that while the number of patient records exposed per breach has varied widely, the number of health data breaches reported grew substantially between 2010 and 2017.

The study, which was conducted by researchers with Massachusetts General Hospital, was published in JAMA. Its aim was to look at the changes in data breach patterns as EHRs have come into wider use.

The authors analyzed 2,149 reported breaches over the previous seven years. The number of records breached for incident varied from 500 to almost 79 million patient records.

Researchers behind the study put breaches reported in three categories: those taking place at healthcare provider sites, within health plans, and at business associate locations.

One thing that stuck out from among the data points was that over that seven-year period, the number of breaches increased from 199 the first year to 344 in 2017. During that period, the only year that did not see an increase in incident volume was 2015.

Another notable if unsurprising conclusion drawn by the researchers was that while 70% of all breaches took place within provider organizations, incidents involving health plans accounted for 63% of all breached records.

Overall, the greatest number of patient records breached was due to compromised network servers or email messages. However, the top reasons for breaches have varied from year-to-year, the analysis found.

For example, the most common type of breach reported in 2010 was theft of physical records. The most commonly breached type of media that year was laptop computer data storage, followed by paper and film records.

Meanwhile, by 2017 data hacking or other information technology incidents accounted for the largest number of breaches, followed by unauthorized access to or disclosure of patient data. In addition, a large number of breaches could be attributed to compromised network servers or email messages.

The number of patient records exposed differed depending on what media was breached. For example, while the total of 510 breaches of paper and film records impact about 3.4 million patient records, 410 breaches of network servers affected nearly 140 million records.

Patient Billing And Collections Process Needs A Tune-Up

Posted on October 1, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study from a patient payments vendor suggests that many healthcare organizations haven’t optimized their patient billing and collections process, a vulnerability which has persisted despite their efforts to crack the problem.

The survey found that while the entire billing collections process was flawed, respondents said that collecting patient payments was the toughest problem, followed by the need to deploy better tools and technologies.

Another issue was the nature of their collections efforts. Sixty percent of responding organizations use collections agencies, an approach which can establish an adversarial relationship between patient and provider and perhaps drive consumers elsewhere.

Yet another concern was long delays in issuing bills to patients. The survey found that 65% of organizations average more than 60 days to collect patient payments, and 40% waited on payments for more than 90 days.

These results align other studies that look at patient payments, all of which echo the notion that the patient collection process is far from what it should be.

For example, a study by payment services vendor InstaMed found that more than 90% of consumers would like to know what the payment responsibility is prior to a provider visit. Worse, very few consumers even know what the deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximums are, making it more likely that the will be hit with a bill they can’t afford.

As with the Cedar study, InstaMed’s research found that providers are waiting a long time to collect patient payments, three-quarters of organizations waiting a month to close out patient balances.

Not only that, investments in revenue cycle management technology aren’t necessarily enough to kickstart patient payment volumes. A survey done last year by the Healthcare Financial Management Association and vendor Navigant found that while three-quarters of hospitals said that their RCM technology budget was increasing, they weren’t necessarily getting the ROI they’d hoped to see.

According to the survey, 77% of hospitals less than 100 beds and 78% of hospitals with 100 to 500 beds planned to increase their RCM spending. Their areas of investment included business intelligence analytics, EHR-enabled workflow or reporting, revenue integrity, coding and physician/clinician documentation options.

Still, process improvements seem to have had a bigger payoff. These hospitals are placing a lot of faith in revenue integrity programs, with 22% saying that revenue integrity was a top RCM focus area for this year. Those who would already put such a program in place said that it offered significant benefits, including increased net collections (68%), greater charge capture (61%) and reduced compliance risks (61%).

As I see it, the key takeaways here are that making sure patients know what to expect financially and putting programs in place to improve internal processes can have a big impact on patient payments. Still, with consumers financing a lot of their care these days, getting their dollars in the door should continue to be an issue. After all, you can’t get blood from a stone.

Healthcare AI Could Generate $150B In Savings By 2025

Posted on September 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Is the buzz around healthcare AI solutions largely hype, or can they deliver measurable benefits? Lest you think it’s too soon to tell, check out the following.

According to a new report from market analyst firm Frost & Sullivan, AI and cognitive computing will generate $150 billion in savings for the healthcare business by 2025.  Frost researchers expect the total AI market to grow to $6.16 billion between 2018 and 2022.

The analyst firm estimates that at present, only 15% to 20% of payers, providers and pharmaceutical companies have been using AI actively to change healthcare delivery. However, its researchers seem to think that this will change rapidly over the next few years.

One of the most interesting applications for healthcare AI that Frost cites is the use of AI in precision medicine, an area which clearly has a tremendous upside potential for both patients and institutions.

In this scenario, the AI integrates a patient’s genomic, clinical, financial and behavioral data, then cross-references the data with the latest academic research evidence and regulatory guidelines. Ultimately, the AI would create personalized treatment pathways for high-risk, high-cost patient populations, according to Koustav Chatterjee, an industry analyst focused on transformational health.

In addition, researchers could use AI to expedite the process of clinical trial eligibility assessment and generate prophylaxis plans that suggest evidence-based drugs, Chatterjee suggests.

The report also lists several other AI-enabled solutions that might be worth implementing, including automated disease prediction, intuitive claims management and real-time supply chain management.

Frost predicts that the following will be particularly hot AI markets:

  • Using AI in imaging to drive differential diagnosis
  • Combining patient-generated data with academic research to generate personalized treatment possibilities
  • Performing clinical documentation improvement to reduce clinician and coder stress and reduce claims denials
  • Using AI-powered revenue cycle management platforms that auto-adjust claims content based on payer’s coding and reimbursement criteria

Now, it’s worth noting that it may be a while before any of these potential applications become practical.

As we’ve noted elsewhere, getting rolling with an AI solution is likely to be tougher than it sounds for a number of reasons.

For example, integrating AI-based functions with providers’ clinical processes could be tricky, and what’s more, clinicians certainly won’t be happy if such integration disrupts the EHR workflow already in existence.

Another problem is that you can’t deploy an AI-based solution without ”training” it on a cache of existing data. While this shouldn’t be an issue, in theory, the reality is that much of the data providers generate is still difficult to filter and mine.

Not only that, while AI might generate interesting and effective solutions to clinical problems, it may not be clear how it arrived at the solution. Physicians are unlikely to trust clinical ideas that come from a black box, e.g. an opaque system that doesn’t explain itself.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of healthcare AI and excited by its power. One can argue over which solutions are the most practical, and whether AI is the best possible tool to solve a given problem, but most health IT pros seem to believe that there’s a lot of potential here.

However, it’s still far from clear how healthcare AI applications will evolve. Let’s see where they turn up next and how that works out.

Will The Fitbit Care Program Break New Ground?

Posted on September 21, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Wearables vendor Fitbit has launched a connected health program designed to help payers, employers and health systems prevent disease, improve wellness and manage diseases. The program is based on the technology Fitbit acquired when it acquired Twine Health.

As you’ll see, the program overview makes it sound as the Fitbit program is the greatest thing since sliced bread for health coaching and care management, I’m not so convinced, but judge for yourself.

Fitbit Care includes a mix of standard wearable features and coaching. Perhaps the most predictable option is built on standard Fitbit functions, which allow users to gather activity, sleep and heart rate data. However, unlike with individual use, users have the option to let the program harvest their health data and share it with care teams, which permits them to make personalized care recommendations.

Another option Fitbit Care offers is health coaching, in which the program offers participants personalized care plans and walks them through health challenges. Coaches communicate with them via in-communications, phone calls, and in-person meetings, targeting concerns like weight management, tobacco cessation, and management of chronic conditions like hypertension, diabetes, and depression. It also supports care for complex conditions such as COPD or congestive heart failure.

In addition, the program uses social tools such as private social groups and guided workouts. The idea here is to help participants make behavioral changes that support their health goals.

All this is supported by the new Fitbit Plus app, which improves patients’ communication capabilities and beefs up the device’s measurement capabilities. The Fitbit app allows users to integrate advanced health metrics such as blood glucose, blood pressure or medication adherence alongside data from Fitbit and other connected health devices.

The first customer to sign up for the program, Fitbit Care, is Humana, which will offer it as a coaching option to its employer group. This puts Fitbit Care at the fingertips of more than 5 million Humana members.

I have no doubt that employers and health systems would join Humana experimenting with wearables-enhanced programs like the one Fitbit is pitching. At least, in theory, the array of services sounds good.

On the other hand, to me, it’s notable that the description of Fitbit Care is light on the details when it comes to leveraging the patient-generated health data it captures. Yes, it’s definitely possible to get something out of continuous health data collection, but at least from the initial program description, the wearables maker isn’t doing anything terribly new.

Oh well. I guess Fitbit doesn’t have to do anything radical to offer something valuable to payers, employers and health plans. They continue to search for behavioral interventions that actually have an impact on disease management and wellness, but to my knowledge, they haven’t found any magic bullet. And while some of this sounds interesting, I see nothing to suggest that the Fitbit Care program can offer dramatic results either.

 

Execs Say Silicon Valley Has The Jump On Healthcare Innovation

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, it’s begun to look as though the leading lights of Silicon Valley might bring the next wave of transformation to healthcare. But can they work big changes in the industry on their own, or are they more likely to succeed by throwing their extremely considerable muscle behind existing healthcare players? That’s one of the many questions at issue as companies like Google, Amazon (Yes, I know they’re in Seattle), and Facebook shoulder their way into the business.

According to a new survey by Reaction Data, many healthcare execs think Amazon, in particular, has the potential to change the game.  When asked which outside entrants were most likely to disrupt the healthcare industry, two-thirds of respondents said the that the online retailing giant topped the list. “Amazon is ahead of the game in many ways compared to the other companies,” a chief nursing officer told Reaction Data.

There’s little doubt that there’s an opening for a company like Amazon to solve some pressing problems. As an industry outsider – unless you count its recent big-ticket acquisition of PillPack, which happened about a minute ago – Amazon may be able to bring fresh eyes to some of healthcare’s biggest problems. For example, what health exec wouldn’t kill to benefit from the e-retailer’s immense logistics capabilities? The mind boggles.

Facebook and Google aren’t making as many healthcare headlines, but they too are moving carefully into the business. For example, consider Google’s partnership with Stanford aimed at creating digital scribes. The digital scribe initiative may not seem like much, but I wouldn’t underestimate what Google can learn from the effort and how effectively it can operationalize this knowledge. It isn’t 2010 anymore, and I think the search giant has come a long way since its Google Health PHR effort collapsed.

Facebook, too, has made some tentative steps toward building a healthcare business, such as its recent agreement to collaborate with the NYU School of Medicine on speeding up MRI scanning using AI. The social networking giant hasn’t shown itself capable of much diversification to date, but I wouldn’t count it out, if for no other reasons than the massive profits to be made. Even for Facebook, we’re talking about serious money here.

If you’re wondering what these companies hope to accomplish, it’s not surprising. There are so many possibilities. One place to start is rethinking the EHR. Maybe I’m a starry-eyed dreamer, but I agree with observers like Dale Sanders, an executive with HealthCatalyst, who argues that Silicon Valley disrupters might be poised to bring something new to the table. “I keep hoping that the Googles, Facebooks and Amazons of the world will quietly build a new generation EMR,” Sanders writes in a recent column.

EMR transformation is just one of many potential targets of opportunity for the Silicon Valley gang, though. There’s obviously a raft of other goals healthcare leaders might like to see realized, The truth is, though, that it matters less what the Silicon Valley giants do than the competitive scramble they kick off within the industry. Even if these behemoths never succeed in leading the charge, they’re likely to spur others to do so.

Does NLP Deserve To Be The New Hotness In Healthcare?

Posted on August 30, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, I’ve been seeing a lot more talk about the benefits of using natural language processing technology in healthcare. In fact, when I Googled the topic, I turned up a number of articles on the subject published over the last several weeks. Clearly, something is afoot here.

What’s driving the happy talk? One case in point is a new report from health IT industry analyst firm Chilmark Research laying out 12 possible use cases for NLP in healthcare.

According to Chilmark, some of the most compelling options include speech recognition, clinical documentation improvement, data mining research, computer-assisted coding and automated registry reporting. Its researchers also seem to be fans of clinical trial matching, prior authorization, clinical decision support and risk adjustment and hierarchical condition categories, approaches it labels “emerging.”

From what I can see, the highest profile application of NLP in healthcare is using it to dig through unstructured data and text. For example, a recent article describes how Intermountain Healthcare has begun identifying heart failure patients by reading data from 25 different free text documents stored in the EHR. Clearly, exercises like these can have an immediate impact on patient health.

However, stories like the above are actually pretty unusual. Yes, healthcare organizations have been working to use NLP to mine text for some time, and it seems like a very logical way to filter out critical information. But is there a reason that NLP use even for this purpose isn’t as widespread as one might think? According to one critic, the answer is yes.

In a recent piece, Dale Sanders, president of technology at HealthCatalyst, goes after the use of comparative data, predictive analytics and NLP in healthcare, arguing that their benefits to healthcare organizations have been oversold.

Sanders, who says he came to healthcare with a deep understanding of NLP and predictive analytics, contends that NLP has had ”essentially no impact” on healthcare. ”We’ve made incremental progress, but there are fundamental gaps in our industry’s data ecosystem– missing pieces of the data puzzle– that inherently limit what we can achieve with NLP,” Sanders argues.

He doesn’t seem to see this changing in the near future either. Given how much money has already been sunk in the existing generation of EMRs, vendors have no incentive to improve their capacity for indexing information, Sanders says.

“In today’s EMRs, we have little more than expensive word processors,” he writes. “I keep hoping that the Googles, Facebooks and Amazons of the world will quietly build a new generation EMR.” He’s not the only one, though that’s a topic for another article.

I wish I could say that I side with researchers like Chilmark that see a bright near-term future for NLP in healthcare. After all, part of why I love doing what I do is exploring and getting excited about emerging technologies with high potential for improving healthcare, and I’d be happy to wave the NLP flag too.

Unfortunately, my guess is that Sanders is right about the obstacles that stand in the way of widespread NLP use in our industry. Until we have a more robust way of categorizing healthcare data and text, searching through it for value can only go so far. In other words, it may be a little too soon to pitch NLP’s benefits to providers.