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Government Regulations for Healthcare – Where Are We At and Where Are We Headed? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/19 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) on the topic of “Government Regulations for Healthcare – Where Are We At and Where Are We Headed?”.

The one constant in healthcare is regulation. Healthcare is a highly regulated environment. There’s no way to get away from it. The best we can do is understand what regulations are coming, influence the rule making process so that good regulations are put in place, and learn to deal with the regulations as best you can.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we talk about some of the latest healthcare regulations. We’ll dive into regulation details and where those regulations could be headed. We’ll also discuss what other regulations might be coming that we should know about. Come and share your perspectives and insights on the important regulations in government.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What government regulations take up the majority of a healthcare organization’s time? What has you concerned about those regulations? #HITsm

T2: How are MACRA and MIPS impacting your organization? What are you doing to make sure you’re compliant? #HITsm

T3: What regulations do you think will be changed soon or which regulations would you like to see changed/updated? #HITsm

T4: What’s happening with value based care and the shift from fee for service? What are you doing to make sure you’re ready for it? #HITsm

T5: What insurance regulations are hitting your organization? How are they impacting you? What other regulation changes should you be watching? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could make any healthcare regulation and have it instantly put in place, what would it be? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/26 – The Health IT Education Landscape
Hosted by @bigdatadavid13

11/2 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/9 – TBD
Hosted by @technursejon

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

“I Don’t Want to Share What I Ate on Social Media” – Dispelling Common Healthcare IT Myths

Posted on October 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I wanted to start a new series of posts I’m calling the Dispelling Common Healthcare IT Myths series. There are a lot of these to cover. In many ways, this series of blog posts is going to cover some of the most common questions I get asked by healthcare providers, CIOs, nurses, practice managers, HIM professionals, etc as I travel all over the country talking to hundreds of people.

The first common myth I want to dispel is that Social Media is for sharing everything you do. This is often illustrated when I talk with someone about social media and then they reply, “I Don’t Want to Share What I Ate on Social Media.” *shakes head*

Social media is SOOOOOO much more than just sharing everything you do throughout the day including what you ate. This is particularly true in the healthcare social media community. Just so I’m clear. Social media can be used to share every meal you ever eat and a few people do in fact share every meal. That said, the majority of people don’t use social media in this way.

It’s easy to see why this perception came about. Many of the initial social media platforms like Facebook said things like “What did you do today?” In fact, I just checked Facebook now and it still says “What’s on your mind, John?” Many initially interpreted it to mean that they needed to share everything they do (including every meal). This idea has shifted and now people are sharing everything imaginable on social media (and even some unimaginable things).

The point being, social media is not really about what you did or what you’ve done or what other people have done. It is more about learning something new, connecting with people, and sharing your unique perspectives and insights on a topic. And you can have some fun on there too.

These ideas are particularly true for social media platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn which have a lot of professionals involved. Sure, those same professionals are on Facebook as well and there are some fantastic Facebook groups where this can happen, but more people use Facebook for personal things and Twitter and LinkedIn for professional things.

Here is some of the value people find from taking part in healthcare social media:

Learning – If you’re following the right people, your Twitter feed can be an incredible source of the latest news, research, and learnings for your industry. The key here is making sure you follow the right people. To see this value, you probably need to follow about 25 extremely active Twitter accounts or 50-100 less active Twitter accounts. Once you do this, your feed will be full of amazing content that stretches your mind and gets you access to information that will help you in your job.

Connecting – One of the powers of Twitter is that you can connect and message with almost anyone on the platform. If you’ve never tried it, you’ll be surprised how accessible and interactive people will be on Twitter. Want a conversation with a CIO on Twitter? That’s easy. Want to interact with someone at CMS? Not a problem. Those are specific use cases, but some of the best connections happen serendipitously. To see what I mean, take part in a Twitter chat. We’re partial to the #HITsm chat we host each week, but there are hundreds of others you can choose from to find your proverbial “tribe” on Twitter. Find your tribe and start engaging with the people tweeting with that hashtag. This is particularly true at many healthcare IT conferences which have a well used Twitter hashtag. You’ll be surprised how quickly you’ll connect with amazing people that can help you and your career. Plus, you’ll benefit from the joy of helping other people as well.

Sharing – While you don’t need to share everything about your life, social media can be a great way for you to share your knowledge and insights with peers. We all have experiences and insights that others will find useful. If you’re not sure what to share, that’s fine. However, as you see other people sharing, engage them in a conversation and you’ll be surprised how you likely have many experiences and insights you can share with others. It’s an amazing feeling when you share something that makes another person’s life better. Don’t think it’s possible? Well, then you probably haven’t shared much on social media. I’ve experienced it hundreds of times and it never gets old.

I could go on and on about this topic, but these are 3 high-level benefits of social media that everyone can enjoy. If you’re involved in social media, please hop in the comments and share other benefits you’ve seen from social media. Of course, if you’re new to Twitter, you can start by following @techguy and @healthcarescene on Twitter and a few hundred others here.

Of course, if you do love food, you can find that on social media like Twitter as well. There’s nothing wrong with mixing work and play if you’re thoughtful about it. In fact, there’s something amazing about reading some healthcare IT tweets, some food tweets, some inspirational tweets, some sports tweets, and then some health policy tweets. That’s the beauty of Twitter. You can follow and customize your feed to the things that interest you.

Long Story Short: Social Media is for so much more than what I ate.

Physician Burnout Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on October 12, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s been a busy week for us here at Healthcare Scene. We were on the road in Seattle at the SHSMD conference which Colin covered really well over on Hospital EMR and EHR and on HITMC.com. Next week we’re off to Boston for the MEDITECH Physician and CIO Forum and the Connected Health Conference, but you already new that if you track our list of healthcare IT conferences. Lots of exciting things ahead which we’ll be sure to share here and on social media.

That said, it’s time for us to prepare for the weekend with our latest edition of Fun Friday. This week’s entry comes from @DocAroundThClok.

[Hospital boardroom]

CEO: I hear the medical staff & residents are burnt out and in significant debt from grad school. Is there anything we can do to help?

CFO: How about a monthly email asking them to donate to the hospital?

CEO: Gee, I don-

CFO: Weekly email?

CEO: Perfect

Burn out is a real thing and while healthcare administrators aren’t the root of all the burnout, they can certainly contribute to more or less burnout. Hopefully a little laughter on a Friday will contribute to less burnout.

When Disasters Hit – A Business Continuity Amazon Order List

Posted on October 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My good friend, Mike Semel from Semel Consulting, has put together an amazing business continuity resource for healthcare organizations. Of course, a lot of this applies personally as well as professionally. You should download the full Semel Consulting Disaster Checklist to see how prepared you and your business are for disaster. This resource seemed appropriate as we watch Florida get hit with more tropical storms and hurricanes, wildfires happening in California and disaster after disaster happening around the world with no signs that they’ll be stopping.

Along with the checklist linked above, Mike also included a list of emergency items you can easily order on Amazon (see the list below with links) to make sure you and your healthcare organization are prepared in case of disaster. This is important since the time to prepare for a disaster is now. Once the disaster happens, stores sell out and you can’t get the things you’ll need to ride out the disaster. As an illustration of this, Mike shared his experience during SuperStorm Sandy:

The generator at my NY home burns 7 gallons per day. Before SuperStorm Sandy I bought the last two 5-gallon cans from my local Lowes, to add to the 5 I already had, so I could store 5 days of fuel. I was in line with about 50 people buying generators. I asked them how many gas cans they had at home and how much fuel they could store. Everyone said they had one can – the biggest was 5 gallons – not even enough to fill the generator once! They all wanted to pay me double or triple what the cans I was buying were worth. I didn’t sell.

Note: These are all Prime-Eligible for quick delivery. Click on the link to order.

Now for the list of emergency items on Amazon that Mike suggests you consider as part of your business continuity efforts.

Radio – weather channel, hand-crank, solar charger, flashlight

Batteries – AAA, AA, C-cell, D-Cell (for lanterns and radios), 9 volt, 2032 lithium

Lantern

Solar charger

External cell phone battery

115-hour candle – make sure you have matches

Water Jug

LifeStraw – for when the water supply isn’t safe to drink

Water Purification Tablets – for when the water supply isn’t safe to drink

Emergency Sleeping Bag

Emergency 2-person 3-day kit

Emergency Food – 18 400-calorie bars – during a disaster you need strength – eat calories!

Emergency Food – 12 meals – 3 days

Emergency Food – 30 days – good for businesses; preparation for sheltering-in-place

Toilet Paper – you won’t laugh when you are the only one in the shelter who thought ahead!

Gas Cans – Generators use 7 gallons per day if run continuously. Most people have less than 5 gallons for their mower.

Along with the stuff you should buy above, be sure to check out the full Disaster Checklist that covers a number of other things you should do to prepare for a disaster.

What have you done in your practice to prepare for emergencies? Are there other things you’d suggest that aren’t on this list? Let us know in the comments or on social media with @healthcarescene.

The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/12 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network (@HMNwriters) on the topic of “The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare”.

It’s time for #NursingNow. Nurses need to have a solid place at the table – from the C-Suite to Management, Entrepreneurs to Digital Health Innovators.  In collaboration with the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses, Nursing Now aims to raise the status and profile of nursing globally.  Nursing Now works to empower nurses to take their place at the heart of tackling 21st Century health challenges.

In this #HITMC chat, Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) and Janet Kennedy (@GetSocialHealth) will lead a discussion on Nurse Leadership and how every part of healthcare needs nurses to be present and actively involved.

Resources:

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Nurses have always been the backbone of healthcare. Do you think they have a large enough role in healthcare leadership? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Should the push to get more nurses in leadership come from nurses or other members of the healthcare team? Why do you think so? #HITsm

T3: Traditional concepts of a nurse’s role have changed over the past decade. What new career paths have you seen nurses take? #HITsm

T4: In a health system or practice setting, in what ways have nurses expanded their roles? #HITsm

T5: Nurses have been embracing entrepreneurship, both inside and outside of healthcare. What characteristics of nursing lend themselves to entrepreneurship? #HITsm

Bonus: Share your favorite nurse story. #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/19 – Government Regulations for Healthcare – Where Are We At and Where Are We Headed?
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy)

10/26 – TBD
Hosted by @bigdatadavid13

11/2 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/9 – TBD
Hosted by @technursejon

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/5 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth) on the topic of “Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring”.

One of the most effective medical interventions to significantly improve the health of patients doesn’t require the latest technology or expensive medication but simply involves helping them take their existing medication as prescribed.

It’s not a light topic, but we believe that people can benefit from more awareness about their actual risks, as opposed to sensationalized risks that make good stories for the popular media.

  • Between 41% and 59% of mentally ill patients take their medication infrequently or not at all.
  • Examples of common non-adherence behaviors include:
    • 1 in 2 people missed a dose
    • 1 in 3 forgot if they took the med
    • 1 in 4 did not get a refill on time

Medication non-adherence is an enormous problem that is still largely unaddressed by the healthcare system, but it’s not totally out of our control. Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we talk about medication compliance and drug monitoring.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: In what ways has medication non-compliance affected you or anyone you know? Professional or Personal. Can be acute or episodic… #HITsm

T2: Why didn’t the patient adhere? Was there a social determinant? An issue with side effects, access or money? Possible Rx abuse? #HITsm

T3: We know communication with healthcare professionals is key in patient’s adherence and that Medication Reconciliation is gaining traction with MIPS, etc., but are providers going into this level of detail (see example) to ensure patients truly understand why they need to take the meds they are prescribed? Why or why not? #HITsm

T4: Beyond condition management, what impact do you think medication non-compliance has on society as a whole? #HITsm

T5: What ideas & thoughts do you have around strategies for improving medication compliance? Have you come across any impactful strategies or workflows? #HITsm

Bonus: What technology do you think could help with these challenges? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/12 – The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

A Justin Bieber Opioid Ballad from ZDoggMD

Posted on September 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s a casual work Friday here at Healthcare Scene, so we like to take off from our regularly scheduled programming for something a little more casual. The latest parody video from ZDoggMD is about the Opioid Crisis and might be his best work yet. The messages he shares in the video are really spot on. I can imagine many of the legitimate chronic pain suffers might not like some of the ways it characterizes those who use opioids, but I thought ZDoggMD covers that in his comments about the impact the opioid crisis has had on chronic pain patients.

Check out the video below:

Have a great weekend and let’s all do what we can to help those around us impacted by opioids.

How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 25, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/28 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox.

In her opening remarks at the 2nd ONC Interoperability Forum, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma set the goal of eliminating the use of fax machines in healthcare by 2020. It’s true – fax is still the most common form of communication among providers for transmission of medical records, test results, instructions, and treatment regimens all thanks to its insusceptibility to hacking. While the rest of the world is embracing digitalization and the benefits it has brought us, healthcare seemed a bit reluctant about moving on. Fax or other paper-based records are largely inconvenient and created barriers to information exchange.

In the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning, we’re generating data in an unbelievable speed – more information to process, exchange and analyze, posing bigger challenges for snail-paced interoperability progress. Tech giants see this lack of interoperability as a perfect opportunity to enter healthcare and disrupt the “broken” industry. Apple Health is promoting open API for iOS users to own their health data; Amazon’s working with multiple healthcare organizations to build its own system; and the recent interoperability pledge by the six big companies is set to transform healthcare data infrastructure.

Coming from an outsider perspective, these companies are familiar with the user authorization approach. When you sign in to an app with your Google account, you’ll be asked to grant the app access to your information through an authentication protocol called OAuth 2.0. Ideally, this is the vision for healthcare data use in the future.

But the existing healthcare data infrastructure, in the meantime, is drastically different from the one these tech giants are familiar with. Perhaps a more realistic, pragmatic approach is to work with the established stakeholders in healthcare, particularly the big EHR vendors, instead of bringing in a whole new system to solve interoperability.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat to discuss interoperability’s impact on technology adoption in healthcare and share your opinions on what stakeholders need to do to improve interoperability and accelerate technology adoption.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are the biggest barriers to technology adoption in healthcare? #HITsm

T2: Is interoperability more challenging now with more data generated by technologies such as AI? #HITsm

T3: Will patient-authorized API access bring fundamental changes to interoperability? #HITsm

T4: How will tech giants’ move into healthcare impact interoperability? #HITsm

T5: What needs to be done by the established stakeholders in healthcare, e.g. EHR vendors, to solve interoperability? #HITsm

Bonus: What do you want as a patient when it comes to interoperability? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Going from Paper-Based Consents to eConsents in Healthcare

Posted on September 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For years we’d talk about the “paperless office” that would be created by the adoption of EHR software. Years later, that paperless office still doesn’t exist. One of the big reasons this hasn’t come to fruition is because EHRs can print massive reams of paper with the click of the button. Another reason the paperless office still alludes us is paper-based consents.

For years, there wasn’t a good way to replace paper-based consents with eConsents. However, that’s not the case today. To help us move towards the paperless office and to learn about adoption of eConsents in healthcare, I interviewed Robin McKee, MS, RN, Director of Clinical Informatics Solutions at FormFast. In this interview, Robin offers a lot of great insights into consents in healthcare and the value of healthcare organizations moving towards eConsents.

What are the main reasons people are still doing paper-based consents?

I see two big reasons for this. First, it’s a case of “it’s what we’ve always done.” When EHRs were first implemented, mobile was not a part of the strategy. This meant that getting a consent in front of a patient still meant paper and a clipboard. Today, the informed consent workflow is difficult if you don’t have a mobile solution.

Another reason is the sheer magnitude of the project. Over the years, each department, even each surgeon, may have their own version of a paper form, adding up to hundreds of variations of paper consent forms stuck in drawers of offices and nurse’s stations. It is a daunting task to try and tackle the conversion, standardization, and consolidation of the plethora of paper consents without a concrete path forward.

FormFast addressed both of those issues with our mobile eConsent solution.  We digitize all of the organization’s consent forms and make them available in an online eForms library.  The forms are delivered at the point-of-care on a mobile tablet for the patient to review and sign.  Once completed, they’re automatically archived in the EHR.  It’s a much more streamlined process.

Are electronic consent forms as legally binding and effective as paper-based consents?

Yes. When you take the stylus and sign your name and submit it, an eConsent electronically dates and time stamps your signature. It also locks the content on the form to prevent it from being modified post signature.

Are there ways that electronic consents are more effective than paper-based consents?

Definitely. In addition to the benefits I mentioned in the previous question, there are several more to add.

From a maintenance standpoint, you have one form to modify and it is instantly available to all staff. Templates can be created to ensure standardized statements on all consents and provide the means to add procedure specific content. Clinicians cannot submit consent forms that have required fields left incomplete. This helps guide the process and ensure consents are completed.

Our eConsent forms also allow for links to your organization’s educational content, right on the form, so it’s easy to link out to approved content for further education while having the informed consent discussion.

What are the biggest misconceptions around electronic consents?

What I have seen most often with our customers has been the idea that the consent is not modifiable, that it is a fixed document. We provide dynamic content based on procedure selection, or editable fields, as well as areas to add content via free text or speech recognition.

Our customers appreciate having a combination of standardized, dynamic, and free text content. Every patient is unique; providers must be able to account for the specific risks, benefits, and alternatives of any procedure for each patient.

What are the costs and savings associated with implementing eConsent?

We see both direct and indirect impact on B organization’s financial landscape. The direct impact is, of course, the savings from eliminating paper. We’ve seen estimates from $3 – 6 per page due to the following factors:

  • Supplies – paper, ink, etc.
  • Materials – copiers, scanners, faxes as well as maintenance on the hardware
  • Staff – to perform printing scanning and indexing functions
  • Storage of paper records
  • Secure shredding of scanned documents

More indirect costs include the loss of productivity of procedures or operating rooms, due to the delays caused by missing or incomplete paper consent forms. A JAMA Surgery article estimated over $500K per year is lost simply on this factor. Also, while less common, malpractice claims that site a lack of informed consent comprise 2/3 of total claims, opening organizations to costly legal proceedings.

One also needs to consider the value of better forms, workflow and communication via eConsent which improves both patient and clinician satisfaction.

Many of the consents are needed in the EHR.  What’s the process for integrating eConsent into the EHR?

Electronic consent forms are superior to paper in this regard. While paper consents get lost or have to be carried around in a paper chart until they are scanned into the EHR, eConsent forms are instantly archived into the EHR. This ensures the document is archived correctly every time.  Plus it is easy to access the form in pre-op, as well as confirm in the OR during timeout. We utilize a variety of methods, including HL7 and FHIR, to integrate with any EHR or document management system.

Are eConsent forms secure and trusted?  Could a digital signature be inappropriately replicated?

There are a couple of ways we prevent signatures from being inappropriately or inaccurately added.

When a clinician chooses to digitally sign a consent form, the login user’s name is applied. Additionally, our solution provides audit logs to track who has been in the system.

We also require that the patient sign each signature field.  This helps ensure that their informed consent is accurately documented.

What are you looking at next when it comes to eConsent?

FormFast recently introduced a great feature that launches and pre-populates the right consent form for the patient by scanning the patient’s wristband.  It’s another way that we’ve tried to make the consent process more streamlined.

We continue to refine our eConsent solution based on customer feedback. No one knows better than the end users what a successful solution should look like, what it should contain, and what makes for an optimal workflow.

We look toward updates, such as enhanced notification processes, more OS compatibility, and further improving the user interface, that will continue to improve clinician and patient satisfaction.

About FormFast
With over 25 years exclusively focused on healthcare needs and 1100+ hospital clients, FormFast is recognized as the industry leader in electronic forms, eSignature, and document workflow technology. FormFast’s enterprise software platform integrates with EHRs and other core systems to automate required documents, capturing data and accelerating workflows associated with them. By using FormFast, healthcare organizations achieve new levels of standardization and operational efficiency, allowing them to focus on their core mission – delivering quality care. Learn more at formfast.com.

FormFast is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 18, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop on the topic of “Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients“.

I, Jen Horonjeff, have a confession – I’m one of the dreaded “non-compliant” patients you hear about. I have been living with juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases for 33 years, so I often have a complex treatment plan. One of my biggest offenses is I don’t get my blood work done every four weeks, which is the regularity for which my doctor has ordered my labs.

I don’t have a fear of needles, it’s also relatively quick to drop into the lab and do, so why don’t I do it?

Because every time I do, the system fails me. The lab inevitably sends me a bill for an exorbitant amount of money claiming my insurance won’t cover it. That’s incorrect, they will, it’s just been billed incorrectly. Yet it’s up to me as a patient to sit on the phone for hours with the lab, the insurance company, my doctor’s office, and probably a friend to vent about it…again.

Healthcare, its systems, products and services, are supposed to improve the lives of patients and families, not create more headaches. But the problem is, until recently, no one really ever asked the patients what they were going through, what mattered to them, or their input how to fix it. Patients have been the recipients of the systems we develop, rather than the co-creators.

This is where human-centered design comes in. Human-centered design is about taking the time to #askpatients and design solutions to fit them, rather than continually have them navigate systems and tools that, at times, feel like a cruel joke. I’m not a bad patient because I don’t get my labs done. I am just exhausted by a system that did not incorporate proper human-centered design.

We all have a role to play to improve this. After a lifetime of stumbling through the healthcare system, I decided to do something about it and started Savvy Cooperative. Savvy is a patient-owned co-op that provides a marketplace for patient insights. Our goal is to make it so easy to connect and work with patients and healthcare consumers there is no excuse not to. I believe the future of healthcare is co-designed with patients.

As you go about your work or interface with the healthcare system, I hope you’ll be on the lookout for all the hoops patients jump through and think, “did anyone #askpatients about this?”

If you need examples where lack of human-centered design affects patients, check out some of our #MessedUpPtExp videos, featuring our friendly Savvy Puppets. Then, join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we’ll discuss it in further detail.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
Ice Breaker: We’ve got a Spotify playlist going of song titles that describe the current state of healthcare – what would you add to our #HealthcareSoundtrack? #HITsm

T1: Everyone has one, what’s one of the messed up patient experiences you’ve personally gone through or heard someone else go through that showed lack of human-centered design? #HITsm

T2: How can technology help to ease these headaches and improve the patient experience, rather than make it worse (feel free to use responses from T1 for inspiration!)? #HITsm

T3: Do you think patients can bring unique and valuable perspectives to the table that can make these technologies even better, and how so? #HITsm

T4: Let’s lay it out there, what are the reasons you have heard for why people or companies don’t work more directly with patients? #HITsm

T5: Some of the big consumer brands have mastered the user experience, but what do they need to do to truly improve the patient experience? #HITsm

Bonus: Who are some of the companies or individuals you feel are winning at human-centered design in healthcare, and what are they doing to show that? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.