Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

AHA Health Forum – A Valuable Potential Partner for HealthIT Companies

Posted on March 26, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

In the hyper-competitive HealthIT market, getting to your target audience within healthcare organizations is critical to success. Cutting through the noise and gatekeepers, however, is difficult. One effective strategy is to partner with an organization that has a trusted relationship with healthcare organizations and collaborate with them to leverage those connections.

The team at the AHA Health Forum has been helping companies for years do just that. I had the chance recently to sit down with Kathleen Wessel, Vice President of Business Development at AHA Health Forum. I asked her about the Forum and what recommendations she has for breaking through the noise in HealthIT.

Kathleen will be a panelist and a sponsor at the 2018 Healthcare IT Marketing & PR Conference.

Tell me about AHA Health Forum and the work it does.

Kathleen: Health Forum is a strategic business enterprise of the American Hospital Association, dedicated to providing insights, resources and innovative services to support our hospital members . This position makes us an indispensable resource for businesses seeking to engage the hospitals we serve.

Can you give an example of how a company might work with AHA Health Forum?

Kathleen: In addition to event sponsorships, conferences, and networking opportunities that connect you with the c-suite, we offer a level of program sophistication and service that isn’t seen elsewhere in the health care space. This includes opportunities such as multi-channel behavioral campaigns to nurture highly targeted audiences, trusted health care data to identify market opportunities, intimate executive events with attendees who have pain points aligned to a vendor’s solution, and lead assist programs to pre-qualify sales ready leads.

What are three things Health IT marketers should do to help identify and deliver messaging to hospital decision makers more effectively? 

Kathleen:

  1. At a high level, educate yourself on latest health care trends and challenges. In account-based marketing, know what is important to the hospital or hospital system. Annual reports, press releases and other public information sources provide a good starting point for individual hospitals.
  2. A closer focus on data can help you learn more about your audience. Leveraging your own internal client data and trusted external health care industry data can lead to breakthrough thinking—helping you grow markets, uncover new opportunities, and can help sales engage in higher value conversations with prospects.
  3. This brings me to my next point. A solutions provider that knows its audience inside out can use this intel to make content that is relevant. As health care leaders face unprecedented change, they don’t just need any content, they need quality content and are looking for solutions.

How is Health IT marketing changing?

Kathleen: Marketers have their work cut out if they’re going to get their message and brand noticed by hospital leaders. In the age of content and information overload, to be heard, you have to be credible and intentional. Health care leaders pay attention to information coming from their peers and institutions they trust. This will require marketers to cultivate client champions and integrate their stories and voice into their marketing campaigns. Marketers would also be wise to make investments in co-branding with trusted associations.

Being a “partner” vs a “vendor” is something we hear a lot about in health care, what does that exactly mean? What makes a company a good partner? 

Kathleen: Vendors focus on why their solution is best in the category; and if the challenge doesn’t fit, a ‘vendor’ tells the client to change to accommodate their solution. In contrast, a partner understands what is important to the hospital and focuses on how their solution can help the hospital achieve its strategic objectives. A partner will work to adapt to a specific challenge. In addition, the hospital looks at the partner for thought leadership, as a trusted advisor who can help guide them through the changes and disruption taking place in the industry.

Strong Showing from Non-healthcare Technology Vendors on #HIMSS18 Exhibit Floor

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The #HIMSS18 exhibit hall was proof of the growing trend of non-traditional healthcare companies entering the market. Along every aisle there were booths from consumer and B2B brands that are familiar outside the context of healthcare. There were mega-brands like:

  • Amazon
  • Cisco
  • Google
  • Microsoft
  • Oracle
  • Verizon
  • Salesforce

But it wasn’t just tech giants that made an appearance at #HIMSS18. Sprinkled throughout the exhibit hall were other organizations who were taking their products and expertise, honed in other industries and applying them to healthcare:

  • Zebra Technologies
  • Windstream
  • Pegasystems
  • Liaison Technologies
  • Microstrategies
  • Panasonic
  • OpenText

I found this second group of companies fascinating.

In recent weeks we have seen big announcement from companies like Apple and Amazon about their new healthcare initiatives. On a #hcldr tweetchat early last month, we solicited opinions in collaboration with HIMSS on whether the arrival of these companies was ultimately going to be good or bad for healthcare. The community’s reaction was one of “cautious exuberance”.

On one hand, many were very excited about the potential for these companies to spur innovation and improve user (aka patient) experiences. On the other hand many people brought forward concerns about how viable these companies could scale their healthcare initiatives.

Consider Amazon and Apple’s recent announcements. Both are working toward creating a private network of clinics that are available to staff that bypasses the traditional provider-payer ecosystem. The goal is to drive down healthcare costs for employees while simultaneously improving workforce efficiency. But both these tech giants have highly-skilled, highly-educated workforces and they both operate in a hyper-competitive talent market where health benefits could be a deciding factor. I’m not sure how this might scale to companies where wages are lower and competition is not as fierce. Would there be the same incentive?

It will be interesting to see how these do-it-yourself approaches work out in the long term. But what has me more excited are the non-traditional healthcare companies that are bringing their products and expertise from other industries to healthcare. Companies like Zebra Technologies (retail & transportation), Windstream (infrastructure & communications) and Pegasystms (financial technology) are quietly using their non-healthcare solutions to improve healthcare TODAY. This practical approach is exciting to see because of the immediate benefit to healthcare and because the solutions are proven.

Their outside-in perspective coupled with their significant resources is something that I will be watching closely in the months following HIMSS18.

*Windstream Enterprises, Pegasystems and Liaison Technologies are sponsors of Healthcare Scene.

Five Not-so-typical meetings at #HIMSS18

Posted on March 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

As the first day of the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall dawned, I had mentally prepared myself for a series of meetings where we would be discussing the product updates, client signings and releases of new thought-leadership content. Fortunately, the universe decided to throw a curveball and I ended up with no fewer than five meetings that were completely different than what I expected.

Meeting 1 – Nuance

I had the opportunity to sit down with Nuance at #HIMSS18. I wrote an earlier post about their #AI Marketplace and I fully expected to listen to an update on that effort plus learn details about the company’s recent announcement of a multi-year collaboration with Partners Healthcare. They surprised me by speaking instead about the importance of their work in the area of incidental findings.

Brenda Hodge, Chief Marketing Officer of Nuance Healthcare spoke passionately about the work that Nuance is doing to help ensure incidental findings are brought to the attention of primary care physicians. Through their AI prioritization algorithms and natural-language-processing capabilities, Nuance has plans to capture this potentially vital imaging information and highlight it so that the right clinical interventions can be applied sooner.

It was the fervor and fire with which Hodge spoke that was the not-so-typical part of our meeting. It was fun to share that moment with a kindred spirit, passionate about improving healthcare.

Meeting 2 – Voalte

The good folks at Voalte provided me the opportunity to do something I have never done at HIMSS – moderate a meetup. We assembled a fantastic group of panelist: @ShahidnShah @innonurse @drandrew76 and Angela Kauffman (from @Voalte) had a lively discussion about Physician Communications. The meetup was even better than I expected.

The conversation flowed easily. Online engagement was high. A good sized crowd gathered to listen. It was a fantastic way to start the day. We captured the meetup on video so watch for clips from the meetup on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel once we recover from #HIMSSanity.

Meeting 3 – TigerConnect (Formerly Known as TigerText)

I stopped by for a quick chat with the team at TigerConnect – the company formally known as TigerText – to talk about their recent rebrand. This meeting was atypical of ones I have had at HIMSS because it was solely focused on their marketing rather than on their products. It was refreshing to have the chance to get a behind-the-scenes view of their recent rebranding initiative.

TigerText is a pioneer in the field of secure communications in hospitals and their brand had become well-established. Unfortunately the “Text” portion of their name was becoming a limitation as their company expanded into adjacent spaces and extended their platform’s capabilities. In just a few months, they made the decision to rebrand and executed it in time for #HIMSS18.

I’ll be writing a more in-depth piece on this after HIMSS, but felt it was worth mentioning because I have never had this type of frank, honest marketing conversation at HIMSS before.

Meeting 4 – Lenovo Health

I stopped by the Lenovo Health booth to see what new things were happening – especially since I had the chance to attend their HealthIT Think Tank event last year. I came for news and I ended up taking a selfie with a custom-made sign. It was energizing to just do something fun in their booth. It was 10 minutes of being creative and capturing a moment in their space. You can see how big our smiles are in the pictures we took.

Meeting 5 – Cerner

The team at Cerner reached out a few days ago and asked to get together. By pure chance, they suggested a time that had recently freed up on my calendar (one of the few open spots I had). I honestly did not read the request carefully before agreeing to it. I thought I was going to be part of a press briefing that was being broadcast. It turned out that the Cerner team wanted to me to be part of their onsite podcast.

We ended up have a wonderful conversation about Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall. It was a free-flowing discussion that I was not expecting. You can listen to the podcast here.

It was so much fun that we continued chatting for 20min after we wrapped the recording. At the end I had the opportunity to officially welcome the Cerner podcasting/social media/marketing crew to #pinksocks. Like the Lenovo Health meeting earlier, it was a rare chance to create a lasting memory. I will not soon forget that #pinksocks gifting – the enthusiasm, surprise and good feeling was just incredible.

Day 1 takeaway – small moments, lasting memories

For me, Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall was all about creating lasting memories from small moments. It wasn’t about the big splashy announcements, but the open/honest conversation. As I reflect on the day, I can’t help but smile at the how the stars aligned to give me a day at HIMSS that is the ideal we strive for in healthcare. Imagine if all across the healthcare ecosystem, clinicians were able to have small moments with patients that were open, honest, free-flowing as well as conversational and where both left the encounter feeling energized.

We need more days like this.

Procrastinator’s Guide to #HIMSS18 and Other Conferences

Posted on March 1, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

I have a confession to make. I have never actually managed to follow any of the popular advice that encourages people to prepare for HIMSS weeks in advance.

As I think back across the 12 HIMSS conferences I have attended, I can’t remember a single time when I started earlier than the week before (the only exception being booth logistics). I never reached out to people to pre-arrange meetings. I never looked at the session schedule more than 5 days before the conference. Even when I was in a sales and business development role, I always found myself scrambling with a week to go.

As I moved into Marketing roles, I did do a little more planning, but it was mostly to make sure the booth had power, carpet, etc. Inevitably I would start my personal HIMSS planning the week before the big event.

So if you find yourself in the same situation for #HIMSS18 (which starts next week) take heart. There is still time to maximize your HIMSS time. Here is my Procrastinator’s Guide to HIMSS18 (and other conferences as well). Enjoy.

Attend as many meetups as you can

Meetups are hands-down the most productive networking events at HIMSS. It doesn’t matter if it’s an official HIMSS meetup (usually held at HIMSS Spot or in the HIMSS Booth) or one that is hosted by a company. Meetups attract thought-leaders and key industry influencers. This is a double-bonus. Not only will you get the chance to connect with the experts leading the discussion, but they will draw in a big crowd of people which provides the opportunity for rich networking.

Do a quick search on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or even Google for “HIMSS18 meetup”. Find a meetup that matches your interests or is aligned with the product/service you offer and put it in your calendar. Another great starting point is this list of meetups that John Lynn put together for #HIMSS18.

Arrive to the meetup 10min before it starts, smile and meet as many people as you can. When you hear an interesting idea, turn to the person next to you and comment on it. Don’t worry, audience participation is encouraged at meetups (it’s not a panel presentation after all). Even better, ask a good question or offer up an interesting fact.

At each meetup it is possible to connect with 5-10 people. Who says you need to pre-arrange all your HIMSS meetings?

Search for sessions where your target audience will be

If you are in a Sales or Marketing role one of the best ways to meet people who might be interested in the products/services you offer is to attend related sessions. Use the HIMSS Session Search feature on the conference website or in the HIMSS app and look for educational sessions on topics that align. For example: “remote patient monitoring” or “care coordination” or “physician communication”.

Attend the session and get to know as many of your fellow audience members as you can. In Marketing-speak, anyone in the audience has just self-identified themselves as an early stage buyer. Mine for the gold!

Pro Tip I: Arrive early. Preferably as the prior session is ending so that you can get in and secure a good seat.

Pro Tip II: If you are interested in connecting with someone from a specific organization. Use the session search on the HIMSS website and type in the name of the organization. Anybody speaking from that organization will appear in the results. Hang out after the presentation for your chance to connect.

Download interesting presentations ahead of time

One of the toughest challenges when building slide decks and blog posts is finding relevant statistics. Luckily HIMSS presentations are full of useful facts and figures. Search for sessions on topics that interest you or that you sell into and download the presentation. Voila your research is done.

Plan on visiting with industry media

If you are a small or medium-sized company, it is almost impossible to get the attention of editors, reporters and writers at healthcare publications at HIMSS. This is my first year attending HIMSS as a member of the press and I can tell you first-hand that there is literally no way I can fit another meeting into my calendar and it was filled a couple of weeks ago. As a result I have dozens of unread media-request emails that I simply cannot get to.

If connecting with media is on your HIMSS to-do list, then use the HIMSS Exhibitor Search feature to see if the particular publication has a booth in the exhibit hall. Be friendly to the business development folks in the booth and they will help get you in touch with the writer/editor that you are trying to connect with.

Pro Tip III: If you REALLY want to connect with a particular person at a publication, you can try heading to the HIMSS Press Room and asking for them. The Press Room is the place that HIMSS sets aside for people to write their articles and conduct interviews. It’s also the unofficial place where media folks hang out when they have a lull in their schedule.

Pro Tip IV: Check out the New Media Meetup which Healthcare Scene organizes every year. The event attracts bloggers, podcasters, YouTubers and traditional media. It is a fantastic place to connect. This year’s event is sponsored by CareCognitics.

Team up with one of your clients and become their party agent

There is no shortage of evening events at HIMSS, especially when it is in Las Vegas. If you didn’t get a pre-HIMSS invitation, don’t worry (for years I never got a single invite and I still only get a handful). Many companies recruit attendees to their evening soirees during the conference itself. If you are a fellow vendor, however, it can sometimes be awkward to try and get into someone else’s event.

In the past I have teamed up with one of my clients (usually one I enjoy hanging out with) and I become their party “agent”. I grab a few of my client’s business card at the start of HIMSS and I carry them with me. When I see an interesting party I walk up and ask for an invitation for myself and my client. I drop their card to show that I am legitimately asking on their behalf. It won’t be long before your evening is full. Just don’t be that person that uses this tip and then doesn’t bring the client.

Buy coffee for a stranger

Many salespeople and marketers attending HIMSS are measured on the number of “new contacts” garnered from the event. This type of measure encourages booth denizens to aggressively flag down people walking past their booths to try and scan their badge. I admit I used to do this, but it always made me feel slimy. Then one day I stumbled onto a better method when I decided to do a good deed at HIMSS09. I bought a coffee for a total stranger. Seriously.

One morning I decided that I wanted to brighten someone else’s day. I was in line at Starbucks and I just decided to pay for the order of the person who had also just ordered at the register next to me. The gentlemen, who had been in a #HIMSSHaze perked up and smiled. It turned out he was the CIO of mid-sized hospital. We spoke for 15min at the Starbucks and we exchanged cards. I tried it five more times that day and each time I had a great conversation and ended up with a strong connection.

Try it. You’ll be surprised at how effective this is…and you’ll feel amazing having done a good deed.

So there you have it. With just a few days before #HIMSS18 there is still time to do all the things above. Play your cards right at #HIMSS18 (sorry couldn’t resist the Vegas cliché) and you’ll come home with new friends and valuable connections.

See you in Vegas!

 

Nuance Communications Focuses on Practical Application of AI Ahead of HIMSS18

Posted on January 31, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Is there a hotter buzzword than Artificial Intelligence (AI) right now? It dominated the discussion at the annual RSNA conference late last year and will undoubtedly be on full display at the upcoming HIMSS18 event next month in Las Vegas. One company, Nuance Communications, is cutting through the hype by focusing their efforts on practical applications of AI in healthcare.

According to Accenture, AI in healthcare is defined as:

A collection of multiple technologies enabling machines to sense, comprehend, act and learn so they can perform administrative and clinical healthcare functions. Unlike legacy technologies that are only algorithms/ tools that complement a human, health AI today can truly augment human activity.

One of the most talked about applications of AI in healthcare is in the area of clinical decision support. By analyzing the vast stores of electronic health data, AI algorithms could assist clinicians in the diagnosis of patient conditions. Extending this idea a little further and you arrive in a world where patients talk to an electronic doctor who can determine what’s wrong and make recommendations for treatment.

Understandably there is a growing concern around AI as a replacement for clinician-led diagnosis. This is more than simply fear of losing jobs to computers, there are questions rightfully being asked about the datasets being used to train AI algorithms and whether or not they are truly representative of patient populations. Detractors point to the recent embarrassing example of the “racist soap dispenser” – a viral video posted by Chukwuemeka Afigbo – as an example of how easy it is to build a product that ignores an entire portion of the population.

Nuance Communications, a leading provider of voice and language solutions for businesses and consumers, believes in AI. For years Nuance has been a pioneer in applying natural language processing (NLP) to assist physicians and healthcare workers. Since NLP is a specialized area of AI, it was natural (excuse the pun) for Nuance to expand into the world of AI.

Wisely Nuance chose to avoid using AI to develop a clinical decision support tool – a path they could have easily taken given how thousands use their PowerScribe platform to dictate physician notes. Instead, they focused on applying AI to improve clinical workflow. Their first application is in radiology.

Nuance embedded AI into their radiology systems in three specific ways:

  1. Using AI to help prioritize the list of unread images based on need. Traditionally images are read on a first-in, first-out basis (with the exception being emergency cases). Now an AI algorithm analyzes the patient data and prioritizes the images based on acuity. Thus, images for patients that are more critical rise to the top. This helps Radiologists use their time more effectively.
  2. Using AI to display the appropriate clinical guidelines to the Radiologist based on what’s being read from the image. As information is being transcribed through PowerScribe, the system analyzes the input in real-time and displays the guideline that matches. This helps to drive consistency and saves time for the Radiologist who no longer has to manually look up the guideline.
  3. Using AI to take measurements of lesion growth. Here the system analyzes the image of lesions and determines their size which is then displayed to the Radiologist for verification. This helps save time.

“There is a real opportunity here for us to use AI to not only improve workflows,” says Karen Holzberger, Vice President and General Manager of Diagnostic Solutions at Nuance. “But to help reduce burnout as well. Through AI we can reduce or eliminate a lot of small tasks so that Radiologists can focus more on what they do best.”

Rather than try to use AI to replace Radiologists, Nuance has smartly used AI to eliminate mundane and non-value-add tasks in radiology workflow. Nuance sees this as a win-win-win scenario. Radiologists are happier and more effective in their work. Patients receive better care. Productivity improves the healthcare system as a whole.

The Nuance website states: “The increasing pressure to produce timely and accurate documentation demands a new generation of tools that complement patient care rather than compete with it. Powered by artificial intelligence and machine learning, Nuance solutions build on over three decades of clinical expertise to slash documentation time by up to 45 percent—while improving quality by 36 percent.”

Nuance recently doubled-down on AI, announcing the creation of a new AI-marketplace for medical imaging. Researchers and software developers can put their AI-powered applications in the marketplace and expose it to the 20,000 Radiologists that use Nuance’s PowerScribe platform. Radiologists can download and use the applications they want or that they find interesting.

Through the marketplace, AI applications can be tested (both from a technical perspective as well as from a market acceptance perspective) before a full launch. “Transforming the delivery of patient care and combating disease starts with the most advanced technologies being readily available when and where it counts – in every reading room, across the United States,” said Peter Durlach, senior vice president, Healthcare at Nuance. “Our AI Marketplace will bring together the leading technical, research and healthcare minds to create a collection of image processing algorithms that, when made accessible to the wide array of radiologists who use our solutions daily, has the power to exponentially impact outcomes and further drive the value of radiologists to the broader care team.”

Equally important is the dataset the marketplace will generate. With 20,000 Radiologists from organizations around the world, the marketplace has the potential to be the largest, most diverse imaging dataset available to AI researchers and developers. This diversity may be key to making AI more universally applicable.

“AI is a nice concept,” continued Holzberger. “However, in the end you have to make it useful. Our customers have repeatedly told us that if it’s useful AND useable they’ll use it. That’s true for any healthcare technology, AI included.”

LTPAC – A Vibrant Hidden World

Posted on November 20, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

PointClickCare, makers of a cloud-based suite of applications designed for long-term post acute care (LTPAC), recently held its annual user conference (PointClickCare SUMMIT) in sunny Orlando, Florida. The conference quite literally shone a light on the LTPAC world – a world that is often overlooked by those of us that focus on the acute care side of healthcare. It was an eye-opening experience.

This year’s SUMMIT was the largest in the company’s history, attracting over 1,800 attendees from skilled nursing providers, senior living facilities, home health agencies and Continuing Care Retirement Communities. Over the three days of SUMMIT I managed to speak to about 100 attendees and every one of them had nothing but praise for PointClickCare.

“I couldn’t imagine doing my work without PointClickCare. I wouldn’t even know where to start if I had to use paper.”

“I don’t want to go back to the days before we had PointClickCare. We had so much paperwork back then and I used to spend an hour or two after my shift just documenting. Now I don’t have to. I track everything in the system as I go.”

“PointClickCare lets us focus more on the people in our care. We have the ability to do things that would have been impossible if we weren’t on an electronic system. We’re even starting to share data with some of our community partners.”

Contrary to what many believe, not every skilled nursing provider and senior living facility operates with clipboards and fax machines. “That’s one of the biggest misconceptions that people have of the LTPAC market,” says Dave Wessinger, Co-Founder and CTO at PointClickCare. “Almost everyone assumes that LTPAC organizations use nothing but paper or a terrible self-built electronic solution. The reality is that many have digitized their operations and are every bit as modern as their acute care peers.”

According to a recent Black Book survey, 19 percent of LTPAC providers have now adopted some form of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. In 2016, Black Book found the adoption rate was 15 percent. The Office of the National Coordinator recently published a data brief that showed adoption of EHRs by Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) had reached 64% in 2016.

Although these numbers are low compared to the +90% EHR adoption rate by US hospitals, it does indicate that there are many pioneering LTPAC providers that have jumped into the digital world.

“It’s fun to be asked by our clients to work with their acute care partners,” explains BJ Boyle, Director of Product Management at PointClickCare. “First of all, they are surprised that a company like PointClickCare even exists. They are even more surprised when we work with them to exchange health information via CCD.”

Boyle’s statement was one of many during SUMMIT that opened my eyes to the innovative technology ecosystem that exists in LTPAC. Further proof came from the SUMMIT exhibit hall where no less than 72 partners had booths set up.

Among the exhibitors were several that focus exclusively on the LTPAC market:

  • Playmaker. A CRM/Sales solution for post-acute care.
  • Hymark. A technical consultancy that helps LTPAC organizations implement and optimize PointClickCare.
  • Careserv. A LTPAC cloud-hosting and managed services provider.

And some with specialized LTPAC offerings:

  • Care.ly. An app that helps families coordinate the care of their elderly loved ones with senior care facilities.
  • McBee Associates. Financial and revenue cycle consultants that help LTPAC organizations.

I came away from SUMMIT with a newfound respect for the people that work in LTPAC. I also have a new appreciation for the innovative solutions being developed for LTPAC by companies like PointClickCare, Care.ly and Playmaker. This is a vibrant hidden world that is worth paying attention to.

Note: PointClickCare did cover travel expenses for Healthcare Scene to be able to attend the conference.

Optimization Dominates CHIME17 Discussions

Posted on November 8, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

“Our EHR Implementation is done”

“We completed our EHR roll-out last year”

“The last EHR module has gone live”

With these words, CIO presenters at the recent CHIME Fall CIO Forum (CHIME17) ushered in a new era in Healthcare IT. Instead of EHR implementations dominating the discussion, optimization was the hot topic of discussion at the event.

“It’s clear to us that CIOs are dedicating more time and energy towards optimizing their systems rather than just implementing them”, says Ed Rucinski, Senior Vice President Worldwide Healthcare Sales at Nuance and CHIME17 attendee. “Our clients, for example, are looking for ways to simplify the documentation physicians have to do in their EHRs so that they can focus their attention back on helping patients.”

Finding ways to better utilize the EHR infrastructure was the subject of many CHIME17 sessions. In one, Sallie Arnett, Vice President Information Systems and Chief Information Officer at Licking Memorial Health Systems, presented how her organization is leveraging EHR and patient monitoring data to detect the early signs of sepsis. Over 62 lives were saved through the work of Arnett and the staff at Licking Memorial.

These results would not have been possible without the investments made in EHR implementations and other digitization efforts.

Several sessions at CHIME17 were centered on the changing role of CMIOs. For the past several years CMIOs have been synonymous with EHR implementations. Now with EHRs up and running, CHIME presenters spoke about how CMIOs were morphing into CHIOs – Chief Health Information Officers – charged with extracting clinical value from the data within the hospital’s systems. This shift in focus is further evidence that healthcare is beginning to move beyond implementation and that we are entering a time of EHR optimization.

The new focus on optimization is a welcome development. It signifies that we are finally near the end of the road-building phase of the inudstry’s EHR journey and we are getting to the phase where we start building things to make the roads useful (like gas stations, diners and cars).

Personally I am looking forward to what the next few years will bring. It will be exciting to see how decision support tools, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, personalized medicine applications and population health systems will leverage the data that is accumulating in EHRs. The next few years will be truly interesting for CIOs.

Nuance Takes Page from Healthcare Clients in Petya Outage Aftermath

Posted on November 6, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

On June 27th the Petya Malware (or NotPetya or ExPteya) struck Nuance Communications (NASDAQ: NUAN). For days the company’s eScription speech-recognition platform were unavailable, forcing thousands of healthcare clients to find alternatives for their medical transcription. During the crisis and in the weeks that followed, Nuance borrowed a page from their healthcare clients: not offering false hope and deconstructing the incident to learn from it.

At the recent CHIME Fall Forum in San Antonio Texas, I had the opportunity to sit down with Brenda Hodge, Chief Marketing Officer – Healthcare and Ed Rucinski, Senior Vice President of World Wide Healthcare Sales of Nuance to talk about the Petya outage and where the company is headed.

“The challenge we faced with Petya brought us all together as a company,” explained Ed. “When our systems went offline, the entire organization rallied together. We had engineers and support staff who slept at the office on couches and cots. We had developers who went with less than 2hrs of sleep for 4 days straight because they wanted to help clients and bring our systems back online as quickly as possible. We became a nameless and rank-less organization working towards a common goal.”

As the outage went from minutes to hours to days, Nuance resisted the temptation to offer false hope to its clients. Instead, the company opted to be truthful and transparent. Nuance sent emails and directly called clients to let them know they had suffered a cyber attack, that the full extent of the damage was not known and that they did not know when their systems would be back online. The company did, however, commit to providing regular updates and being available to answer questions and address concerns.

The following is an abbreviated excerpt from a Nuance communication posted online by one of its clients:

Nuance corporate systems were unfortunately affected by a global cyber attack today. We went into immediate security protocol by shutting down our hosted production systems and platforms. There is no update at this time as to when the accounts will be back online but we will be holding regular calls throughout the day and night to gain insight into the timeline for resolution and I will update you again when I have more info. We are sorry for the inconvenience this outage has caused and we are working diligently to get things back online.

Clinicians are coached never to give patients in crisis or their families false hope. They calmly explain what happened, state the facts and talk about potential next steps. They do not, however, say that “things will be alright”, even though they know that is what everyone desperately wants to hear. Nuance used this same protocol during the Petya outage.

The company also used protocols similar to those used following an adverse event.

Healthcare is complex and despite the best efforts and best intentions of care teams, errors occur. These errors are referred to as adverse events. Adverse events that impact patient safety or that cause actual harm to patients are thoroughly documented, deconstructed and analyzed by clinical leaders as well as risk managers. The lessons gleaned from these unfortunate events are captured and used to improve operations. The goal is to prevent or mitigate the impact of similar events in the future.

After their systems were fully restored, the Nuance team embarked on a thorough review of the incident – from technical procedures to client communication protocols.

“We learned a lot through this incident” says Hodge. “We got a first-hand education on how sophisticated malware has become. We’ve gone from viruses to malware to ransomware to coordinated nation-state attacks. That’s what Petya really is – a coordinated attack on company infrastructure. Now that we have been through this type of attack, we have put in new processes and technologies to prevent similar attacks in the future. Most importantly we have made investments in improving our response to these types of attacks.”

Nuance has gone one step further. They have committed to sharing their painful lessons learned with other companies and healthcare institutions. “Like it or not, we are all in this together”, continued Hodge. “The Petya attack came on the heels of the WannaCry ransomware attack that impacted many of our healthcare clients – so there was a lot of empathy from our clients. In fact this whole incident has created a sense of solidarity in the healthcare technology community. Cyber attacks are not going to stop and we need to come together as an industry so that we are as prepared as we can be for the next one.”

“It’s unfortunate that it took an incident like this to show us what we are made of,” says Rucinski. “We had executives making coffee and fetching lunch for the support teams. We had leaders offering to run errands for staff because they knew they were too tired to keep up with those types of things. In the end we found out we truly embody the values and principles that we have hanging on posters around the office.”

Moving from “Reporting on” to “Leading” Healthcare – A Conversation with Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright, President & CEO of MGMA

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

In Chapter 3 of Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright’s new book Back to Balance, she writes: “People are increasingly being treated as if they are the same. Science and data are being used to decrease variability in an attempt to get doctors to treat patients in predictable ways.” This statement is Fischer-Wright’s way of saying that the current focus on standardization of healthcare processes in the quest to reduce costs and increase quality may not be the brass ring we should be striving for. She believes that a balance is needed between healthcare standardization and the fact that each patient is a unique individual.

As president of the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), a role Fischer-Wright has held since 2015, she is uniquely positioned to see first-hand the impact standardization (from both legislative and technological forces) has had on the medical profession. With over 40,000 members, MGMA represents many of America’s physician practices – a group particularly hard hit over the past few years by the technology compliance requirements of Meaningful Use and changes to reimbursements.

For many physician practices Meaningful Use has turned out to be more of a compliance program rather than an incentive program. To meet the program’s requirements, physicians have had to alter their workflows and documentation approaches. Complying with the program and satisfying the reporting requirements became the focus, which Fischer-Wright believes is a terrible unintended consequence.

“We have been so focused on standardizing the way doctors work that we have taken our eyes off the real goal,” said Fischer-Wright in and interview with HealthcareScene. “As physicians our focus needs to be on patient outcomes not whether we documented the encounter in a certain way. In our drive to mass standardization, we are in danger of ingraining the false belief that populations of patients behave in the same way and can be treated through a single standardized treatment regimen. That’s simply not the case. Patients are unique.”

Achieving a balance in healthcare will not be easy – a sentiment that permeates Back to Balance, but Fischer-Wright is certain that healthcare technology will play a key role: “We need HealthIT companies to stop focusing just on what can be done and start working on enabling what needs to be done. Physicians want to leverage technology to deliver better care to patient at a lower cost, but not at the expense of the patient/physician relationship. Let’s stop building tools that force doctors to stare at the computer screen instead of making eye contact with their patients.”

To that end, Fischer-Wright issued a friendly challenge to the vendors in the MGMA17 exhibit hall: “Create products and services that physicians actually enjoy using. Help reduce barriers between physician, patients and between healthcare organizations. Empower care don’t detract from it.”

She went on to say that MGMA itself will be stepping up to help champion the cause of better HealthIT for patients AND physicians. In fact, Fischer-Wright was excited to talk about the new direction for MGMA as an organization. For most of its history, MGMA has reported on the healthcare industry from a physician practice perspective. Over the past year with the help of a supportive Board of Directors and active members, the MGMA leadership team has begun to shift the organization to a more prominent leadership role.

“We are going to take a much more active role in healthcare. We are going to focus on fixing healthcare from the ground up –  from providers & patients upwards. In the next few years MGMA will be much bigger, much strong and even more relevant to physician practices. We are forging partnerships with other key players in healthcare, federal/state/local governments and other associations/societies.“

Members should expect more conferences, more educational opportunities and more publications on a more frequent basis from MGMA going forward. Fischer-Wright also hinted at several new technology-related offerings but opted not to provide details. Looking at the latest news from MGMA on their revamped data-gathering/analytics, however, it would not be surprising if their new offerings were data related. MGMA is one of the few organizations that regularly collects information on and provides context on the state of physician practices in the US.

It will be exciting to watch MGMA evolve in the years ahead.

MGMA17 Day 1 – Drawing Inspiration from Consumer Experience

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Last night, attendees celebrated the opening of the Medical Group Management Association’s annual conference (MGMA17) in Anaheim CA with a block party that featured local food trucks instead of traditional food-stations. This welcome twist allowed attendees to sample small portions from several vendors.

The block party was a reflection of the exhibitor reception that happened earlier in the evening. With just 90 minutes, attendees could only sample a small portion of the 300 vendors that filled two halls in the Anaheim Convention Center. Despite that short amount of time, a key theme emerged – consumer experiences are serving as inspiration for HealthIT companies.

Ken Comée, CEO of CareCloud, summed it up this way: “Patients have high expectations from their healthcare providers now. They want the same level of service and convenience that they get from Amazon, Uber, OpenTable and banks.”

Prominently featured in the CareCloud booth was Breeze – a recently announced platform developed in partnership with First Data (see this blog post for more details). Comée had this to say about their new platform “If I had to compare Breeze to a consumer experience, I would have to say that it is most similar to checking in for a flight. Very few people check in for their flight in-person at the airport anymore. Almost everyone checks in at home on their computer or via their phone well ahead of their flight. You fill in all the relevant information online and you just show up to the airport and go where you need to go. There’s no paperwork you have to fill out, no need to arrive early…it’s just a smooth seamless experience. Armed with Breeze, our clients can now offer that same airline check-in experience with new as well as returning patients.”

A few booths over, David Rodriguez founder of NextPatient, talked about how OpenTable was one of the inspirations for their online appointment-booking platform. “In today’s world, when a person arrives at the website of a restaurant, they want to be able to see the times when they can make a reservation and they want to be able to click the time they want, fill in no more than 2 or 3 key pieces of information and lock it in. That’s what we offer physician practices – an elegant way to allow patients to click and book an appointment right from the practice’s own website without complex coding.”

Calibrater Health, a company that texts surveys to patients after a visit and creates “tickets” for any responses with a low NPS, was inspired by ZenDesk. Though not technically a consumer-facing application, ZenDesk does help companies forge and manage relationships with end-users by streamlining customer-service workflows, something Calibrater brings to its clients.

Patient engagement vendor, Relatient, drew inspiration from salon experiences. For many years it has been common practice in the salon and spa industries to send customers friendly reminders of their upcoming appointments via voice, text and email. Not only did these reminders reduce no-shows, but they also helped to improve customer loyalty. The Relatient solution brings those same benefits to healthcare organizations.

The night’s most thoughtful story of consumer inspiration came from Aaron Glauser, Senior Director of Product Marketing at AdvancedMD. “If I had to pick a consumer experience that inspires me and that we are closest to, it’d have to be Amazon. When you search Amazon for a product, a lot of matching entries come up – just like searching online for a doctor. You then narrow the search by looking at the star ratings and the reviews. Once you decide on a product, you click in and you decide how, when and where you want it delivered. That’s how patients want to book appointments. With AdvancedMD they can choose an open appointment time and they can even opt for a telemedicine appointment. That’s analogous to whether I want the physical book or the Kindle version on Amazon. Then as a user I get to choose how I want to pay for my Amazon purchase – which we can offer through AdvancedMD.”

Whether its Amazon, Zendesk, OpenTable, a salon or an airline that has served as inspiration. What was made clear on Day 1 of MGMA17’s exhibit hall is that consumer-experiences have become an important factor in the design of HealthIT solutions…and healthcare will be better for it.