Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Why No Disclosure of Financial Relationships with KLAS When You Win Best in KLAS?

Posted on February 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’ve been inundated with press releases and companies promoting their Best in KLAS ranking/rating (whatever you want to call the award). In fact, I’ve gotten so many notices from so many healthcare IT companies, it prompted to me to send the following tweet:

Ironically, that tweet was before I got another dozen more press releases, blog posts and tweets informing me of how great their company is because they’re “Best in KLAS.”

In a conversation I had with someone who was “Best in KLAS” and when I saw a blog post by a CEO that was so proud of their Best in KLAS rating, I wondered why we don’t have some expectation of financial disclosure with these type of ratings and awards. This isn’t an issue for KLAS alone, but would apply to Gartner and a number of other organizations that offer these type of healthcare IT software ratings.

In the blogging and media world, the topic of disclosing financial interests is often discussed. It’s a policy that I follow myself. If I ever write about a company for which I have a financial relationship (advertiser, sponsored content, email campaigns, etc), I disclose that financial relationship in the article. I believe it’s important for anyone reading that article to know that there’s a financial relationship which could sway the content.

Shouldn’t we expect the same from companies who have a financial relationship with these ratings organizations? There’s a possibility that the financial relationship could have made a difference in those ratings. Shouldn’t we know about this potential for bias?

Of course, I don’t expect we’ll see many organizations take me up on this idea that they disclose their financial relationship. So instead, I’m calling on those Best in KLAS companies who don’t have a financial relationship with KLAS to come forward and disclose that they don’t have a financial relationship with KLAS and they still were given a Best in KLAS rating. I’ll be interested how many come forward.

As I’ve long told people who ask me about the value of KLAS, I think there’s so many ways to skew their results that I don’t put much value in their results. Plus, I’m not sure about their methodologies which include doing ratings at EHR user conferences (biased sample anyone?).

However, for marketers, I tell them they absolutely should make the most from a Best in KLAS rating. Most healthcare organizations don’t understand (likely because they’re too busy) the nuance in proper ratings and therefore blindly use KLAS for their decision making. Unfortunately in healthcare IT, these people don’t have any other choice but KLAS. So, given no better alternative, it’s no surprise that they use what’s available.

Of course, my hope is that most healthcare organizations use KLAS, Gartner magic quadrants and whatever other ratings and rankings that exist as just another data point. Triangulating across those and your colleagues is often going to lead people to the best solution.

Full Disclosure: I have an affiliate partnership with a company Gartner bought for some EHR lead generation. I’m sure they’ll love this article.

Crowdfunding Medical Bills

Posted on February 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had a friend send over a Give Forward campaign for the Faul Family Recovery Fund. I don’t know the family, but they have three autistic children and one fo the daughters has a severe congenital heart defect. To top if off, the Father is autistic and suffers from depression and lost his job thanks to these health challenges. Such an amazing situation.

It’s no wonder that this family is having financial challenges and needs people to support their GiveForward campaign. We’ve all heard that medical bills is the #1 source of bankruptcy in the US. It’s expensive to get the treatment you need when you have a chronic illness.

With that said, I’m really intrigued by these crowd funding platforms that help people like the Faul Family raise money from family, friends and other caring people in order to help cover their medical expenses. The campaign I mentioned has currently raised $4,225 and they’re trying to raise $25,000. That’s not a small sum of money, but is much more manageable when a crowd of caring people are all contributing their Starbucks money to someone in need. The site has raised nearly $150 million this way. That’s amazing!

While Give Forward can be used for a lot of things, the medical category seems to dominate. A look through the medical category puts a face, a name and a story to healthcare in a way that those outside of healthcare rarely see. Walking through the list is both expiring and heart wrenching. Something that those on the front lines of healthcare see every day.

As someone who writes about healthcare, IT, and social media I’m really intrigued by the crowdfunding of medical bills. No doubt it’s a lifesaver for so many involved and likely gets a lot of doctors and hospitals paid that would otherwise get paid. I think those are great things. Plus, I think there’s value to all of us to give of ourselves to others.

I guess I just wonder if this will become a predominant model or how this model will evolve over time. Every hospital in the nation has stories like this walking through their doors every day. Should healthcare organizations be partnering with these crowdfunding platforms? Where do you think all of this is going?

Interesting EMR Interface Prototype

Posted on August 27, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I love when doctors and medical students talk about their first encounter with EHR software. In this case, I came across a medical student who ran into Epic in the hospital and writes about it in this post. Here’s his initial response to it:

I took the training module for it and the moment it loaded, I was bewildered. My monitor had turned into a wormhole and was suddenly displaying software built in the 1990s. I stared for 30 minutes at what was basically a wall of text, trying to find my way around small buttons and clogged sub-screens. I hadn’t even learned how to use Epic yet and I was already frustrated. Perhaps it’s because Epic was a platform built upon billing practices that made it so confusing. Either way, I was done before I had even begun.

The great part is that he wasn’t just complaining about the experience. He decided to create a prototype of what he thought an EMR interface could look like. Here’s his video prototype:

Obviously, it’s lacking a lot of detail, but I love his fresh take on how you could navigate the information in the EHR. We need more people who aren’t clouded with current EHR design to offer design suggestions like this.

Build Your Own EHR, EMR Patient Satisfaction, and Social Media in EMR

Posted on August 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


It looks like Dr. Rob Lamberts is crazy. It’s nice of Farzad to support him. I think Dr. Lamberts response to Farzad was enlightening as well: “Thanks. More endurance than luck, though.” He’s right. None of the individual components of an EHR are technically very hard, but the number of components you have to build is HUGE.


This is a perception thing for sure. We are trained that technology improves whatever it touches. So, when a patient sees a doctor with an EMR, they believe it will mean better quality care. Reminds me of the “Got EMR?” campaign I talked with people about 7 or 8 years ago.


I question the value of having a patient’s social profile in your EMR. However, I think the concept of looking at your EMR as a CRM for patients could become a very important concept over the next 5 years. I think it will take more than just putting in a patient’s social profile though.

Mobile for EMR Data Input

Posted on October 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Note: I know that there are some mistakes and incongruencies in this post. That was partially by design since it was illustrating my first attempt at voice recognition for blog posting. I did try and correct many things along the way, but as you’ll read some of it doesn’t read very well.

I’m stuck on the tarmac in JFK airport thought I’d try see how the voice recognition work today to input on a mobile phone.

Amazing thing is this is the first time I’ve used voice recognition on the Android S3 phone. It seems like a pretty good experience so far with voice even with a soft voice in an airplane it’s turning out quite well.

I was a little concerned about how long it would take to write a blog post on the phone but the voice recognition works out quite well. I have had to make a few corrections to it, but for the most part it’s done really well.

I’m not sure how many doctors will want to use voice and of course I haven’t done any medical terms for example I can talk about my son’s previous diagnosis of mastocytosis as an example to see how it will transcribe. As you can see I didn’t actually have to correct it and I got message cytosis without any problem so it did pretty good.  I wonder if other doctors have used the voice recognition on the Android phones or Android tablets to see how well it does with voice recognition of medical terms.  Although the second time I said mastscytosis it didn’t get it right.

Overall I’m pretty happy with the voice recognition. I have written this whole post in about 5 minutes and it’s the first time I’ve use voice recognition on the phone.  With that said I still probably rather type than use voice recognition for blog posts. However, I would rather use voice recognition than the keyboard on the phone.

Have you used voice recognition? In what ways to use voice recognition? I’m looking forward to using voice recognition more and I’ll let you know how it goes. What is amazing is that this technology is built into every new smartphone out there.

I’m off to the CHIME conference later today so I’ll have more details on that coming soon.

Perceptions of Hospital IT and Nursing

Posted on August 3, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In response to my post about the Old Boys Club of Healthcare IT, David Allinder, RN offered these interesting perceptions of IT and nursing. These are generalizations, but worth considering:

PERCEPTIONS OF IT: The IT department is sealed behind coded doors locked away from patient care. The only way to contact them is by calling the help desk (which usually doesnt). Time is taken away from patient care to sit on hold for what seems like forever. And then after you define your issue they say let me contact the IT person they will call you back.

PERCEPTIONS OF NURSING: Nurses are control freaks with OCD issues. No one had better mess with my unit, pateints, processes, workflow. Nursing is sitting in a hallway with opened desks with call lights and phones constantly ringing they are there to respond instantly to demands and requests. Nursing are at the bedside taking care of patients. Electronic devices take too much time away from the patient care. I cant do my job because the stinking computer is broken AGAIN.

Don LeBreux summarized my feelings on the above comments, “Your “perceptions” are basically dead on. Funny and sad.”

What strategies have you seen that work to bridge the divide and overcome these perceptions?

Lawsuits Will Eventually Drive EHR Adoption?

Posted on August 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the recent #HITsm chat, tireless patient advocate Sherry Reynolds offered this intriguing tweet:

The first question I’d ask based on this tweet is when will EHR become the “standard of care.” I’m sure that some could argue that now based on the $36 billion in EHR incentive money that the government is spending. However, even the most optimistic EHR adoption numbers are at 50% and I’d put it closer to 30% with ambulatory EHR dragging that number down. With that said, what would it take to have EHR as the standard of care that a doctor provider? I’m not a lawyer, but I know a number of healthcare lawyers read this blog. I hope that some of them will chime in with their thoughts.

Sherry’s last comment about not having the lab results points more towards the exchange of healthcare data being the real issue a doctor could face. Not only would this be a potential lawsuit issue for doctors, but at some point enough patients will ask this question as well. I’m sure most doctors aren’t worried since we’re pretty far from that tipping point.

I do think that doctors are quite attune to liability and can be a very big motivating factor for them. I think the same will happen with insecure text messaging in healthcare. The first couple lawsuits against a doctor for sending PHI over text and we’ll see widespread adoption of secure text platforms.

While I can see some of the realities that Sherry tweeted about, a part of me really hates to think that fear of lawsuits would end up being the driving force behind EHR adoption.

Republican Candidates Healthcare Stances

Posted on September 9, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. James Coffin, VP of Healthcare and Life Sciences at Dell, has a post up on the Dell Healthcare Community site that looks at the stances of the various Republican candidates for the US Presidential nomination. It’s an interesting read if you haven’t been following the republican candidates very much.

What the article doesn’t address is these candidates stance on the HITECH Act. The key here is to realize that the HITECH act isn’t part of the Affordable Care Act which every GOP candidate is saying they will repeal if they become President. So, where does that really leave the HITECH Act should a republican president be elected?

The problem is that no one really knows. Those who argue that the HITECH Act is safe often lean on the ideas that EMR and EHR has always had bipartisan support. Many often mention that the push for adoption of EHR software was started by a republican president, George W. Bush. I actually agree that both sides of the aisle want to have widespread adoption of EHR. We could certainly argue the benefits or detriments of EHR adoption, but for a relatively uninformed senate, house and president when it comes to EHR, they’re going to easily grab on to the idea that technology can improve healthcare. We may agree or disagree with this point, but I think we’d be hard pressed to find a senator that thinks we shouldn’t have EHR technology in healthcare.

The problem with the above discussion has to do with the way that EHR is being paid for. Again, this isn’t about whether the idea of paying doctors to use EHR software is right or wrong, good or bad. This is more about the political stance of the republicans and how they want government to spend money. It seems very clear to me that Republicans are going to keep sitting on their no spending/cut spending soap box. If a republican becomes President, we’re likely to see widespread cuts. Could HITECH money be a casualty of those cuts? Absolutely. Will they be a casualty? Can anyone predict what Washington will really do?

Should doctors and practices then be afraid of going after the EHR stimulus money? Well, I’ve been advising doctors and practices for the last couple years to not implement an EHR in order to get the government hand out. Those that are doing EHR for “free” government money are going to be disappointed. Not only because the money could be cut, but because sooner or later that money will be gone. So, if you’ve followed my advice, then the loss of the EHR stimulus money will be unfortunate but not too terrible.

On the other hand, those people who only did EHR because the government was waving the carrot and the stick are likely going to be quite disappointed. Particularly if the practice focused on the governments EHR requirements instead of their own individual practice needs when it comes to an EHR. Sadly, I believe there are many clinics in this boat.

I’m sure there are other Washington DC insider workings that are in play as well. Hopefully many of you will share some of what you know in the comments.

Personally, I’m still fairly confident that the EHR stimulus money will play itself out. I’ll be a little surprised if indeed it does get cut. I think republicans will have larger fish to fry. However, there’s certainly that possibility, so doctors should take this into account when they’re selecting and implementing an EHR.

Labor Day

Posted on September 5, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you that were expecting a meaningful use monday post, I’m sorry. Don’t worry though, Lynn will be back with another Meaningful Use Monday post next week. It is Labor Day after all. Although, I saw a great tweet or Facebook status that said, “Why in America do we take the day off on Labor day?” I love plays on words. They also asked why we put a tree in our house for Christmas and not Arbor day.

I must admit that Labor day has become pretty inconsequential for me. Football has already started. My son’s been in school for a week already. Blogging for myself, it’s not like I really get a day off. Plus, we don’t live close to family, so there aren’t even any big family parties.

With that said, I am glad to have the summer behind us. Maybe that’s a function of living in Las Vegas. I’m beginning to understand why retired people come to Vegas in winter and head to cooler areas for summer. Maybe one day I’ll achieve that dream. Although, I also must admit that there’s something comforting about getting back into the routine of school and other activities. Maybe this is a function of younger kids being home all summer.

I must admit that this Labor Day my thoughts have been with many of those who are without jobs. It’s a crazy economic and political environment that we’re in now. I’m afraid we’re looking at a slow recovery and so we’re going to be in the current situation for a while to come.

My one consolation is that there are now 10 writers on the HealthcareScene.com blog network. That’s pretty good considering a year and a half ago when I quit my day job it was just me. I hope I can continue to grow the network and provide even more people income writing about EMR and Health IT. I’m lucky to be associated with such amazing writers. If you don’t know what I mean, go check out some of the other HealthcareScene.com blogs.

Now, time for a little family time. I hear making a fort with my kids is on the agenda today. I love being a kid again.

EHR Growth, HIT and EHR Standards, Hospital EMR User Tracking Bill, and MGMA Conference in Las Vegas

Posted on September 4, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for my roundup of interesting topics seen throughout the interwebs and related to EHR and healthcare IT.

@Allscripts
Astounding growth in use of EHRs – 5x in 2.5 yrs – Dr. Mostashari at #ACE2011 (via Skype) – does your doc use an EHR?

I’d like to see where Dr. Mostashari got those numbers. I think there’s little doubt that EHR use is up. If we say that 2.5 years ago it was at about 15%, then that would mean that using his growth number we’re now at 75%. That seems way too high for me.

@shelleypetersen – Michelle Petersen
US are starting to standardise vendor requirements for #healthit and language used in #EHR regions, important move

Is this a misread of what’s being done with meaningful use and EHR certification? I haven’t seen standards really emerge for most of this. I guess it does say “starting.”

Hospital EMR User Tracking Bill
Don’t ask me why, but this post about a CA Bill Requiring Hospital EMR Software to Track Users came across my tweet stream as well even though it was posted back in June. I guess that’s one thing I love about Twitter. It can bring back interesting content that you wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

After reading the post, I wondered if the CA bill passed or not. I’m guessing not. Although, I’m still shocked by the article’s comments that even an expensive Epic install at Kaiser can’t meet the requirements of reporting on what data for a patient in an EHR has been deleted and who’s accessed that patient data.

MGMA Conference in Las Vegas
I’ll admit that I’ve wanted to go to the MGMA conference for a couple years now. This year I’m lucky that it’s hosted in the beautiful Las Vegas. So, I’ll definitely be there enjoying the event. I’ve been thinking about doing a New Media Meetup at MGMA like I do at HIMSS. Are any readers interested if I put it together? If there’s only a few of you, we could just do a dinner or something. Let me know in the comments or on my contact us page.