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Is Health Data Privacy On Its Way Out?

Posted on April 30, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As healthcare providers gradually improve their HIPAA data security and privacy compliance, one might think that the odds of a breach occurring are getting lower. Maybe that’s true within the provider organizations themselves, but there are forces outside of healthcare which will make it impossible to protect personal data in the future, according to a post on Axoblog.

The piece argues that the notion of data privacy is dying. “To the extent that emails and other communications meant for designated recipients are analyzed, scraped aggregated and stored it is the opinion of this author that the protection of PHI is illusory,” the article says.

As the piece correctly notes, unscrupulous companies and can learn a great deal about consumers by analyzing their Internet search history. And of course, there are social media stalkers like Facebook, which monitors Internet activity even when the subscriber is logged off. (It’s hard to believe that other Internet companies aren’t doing the same thing in a less public manner.)

By using a rich source like Facebook user data and aggregating it with information from other social media networks, outsiders can pull together a personal profile of users. This database could easily expose medical information that should be protected under HIPAA and HITECH.

And it’s not just Facebook data that is of concern. By buying available data from all the social media networks, then matching that data with commercial databases offering details such as address, phone number and location, it’s possible to develop an astonishingly detail portrait of individuals.

So what should providers do in the age of minimum privacy? Be aware of emerging threats, the author suggests:

  • Be aware that social media outlets aren’t subject to the legal requirements providers are when compiling health information.
  • Keep your eye on data aggregators, which are selling data to everyone you can think of, plus others you wouldn’t even have considered, including marketers, advertisers and researchers.
  • The government has only now begun trying to understand how social media networks handle privacy and how well they explain their practices to consumers
  • In the wake of Facebook scandals, social media giants might develop protocols for managing sensitive data, but they may fail at doing this, in which case the government is likely to step in
  • Though Facebook has been asked by regulators how the company manages and shares data, it seems that no one’s asking about the aggregation of data and how it is stored and protected

Now, I’d like to think the article described above is a bit too pessimistic. If nothing else, I’m not sure that the aggregation of other forms of data means that medical privacy will become impossible to defend. Still, the piece makes it clear that we have a long way to go before we can sure PHI is protected by companies like Facebook.

HIT Software Upgrades and Telemedicine Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on April 27, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re heading into the weekend and so it’s time for another Fun Friday. This first cartoon is something that all EHR users and those involved in software updates will understand. What’s interesting is that many EHR users haven’t learned the lesson from Windows updates. So many healthcare organizations are working on outdated EHR software. Of course, there’s a good balance. I’ve been at the leading edge of EHR upgrades and gotten really burnt before too. Somewhere in the middle is best. Of course, if you’re on a true cloud based EHR, then you don’t really get a choice. Something that makes many people love cloud based EHR and some people hate them.

And now for some mental health telemedicine fun. There is some irony in the situation.

Be Skeptical About Health IT Research Reports

Posted on April 26, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Look, I get it. While advice from colleagues is fine, it’s even better to have an objective research organization tell you which vendors dominate the market and which seem to have a lot of fans.

You know some of the headlines, in big bold letters: “Epic has the biggest EMR market share in the US” or “Doctors are very satisfied with eClinicalWorks.” Hey, if nothing else, you can wave the report in your boss’ face if your new system doesn’t work out.

The thing is, are you getting valuable, fair, unbiased feedback from research vendors? Not necessarily.

  • Pay for play: Some research firms are getting paid to promote certain products or organizations in their reports and client notes. The payment can be as subtle as a few introductions to potential customers or a straight up bundle of cash. Sadly, not all analyst firms who engage in this practice will tell you that they do.
  • Lack of experience: While some research reports are written by senior people with a long institutional memory, sometimes they are farmed out to junior staff members with a lot less perspective. I’m not suggesting that the younger people get it wrong, but they simply can’t offer the kind of insight senior people can.
  • Beauty contests: Be warned: sometimes reports are just not about you. It may appear, on the surface, that the research firm is offering you valuable insights, but the truth is that the research isn’t that substantial. In cases like these, the firms simply line up all the vendors in a row and rate them on scales they basically make up in their head.
  • Value of the data: Sure, it’s sort of fun and interesting to know whether Epic has nudged out Cerner or MEDITECH in the battle for US market share. It’s something to share over the health IT water cooler. And it seems to give you a sense of which vendors are offering the most value. But does it really? In most case, it probably isn’t that helpful to track market share unless you hold stock in one of these companies.

For what it’s worth, I’ve written several in-depth research reports of my own, and I feel pretty good about the industry analysis I did. But thankfully, none of the publishers suggested that I was the Oracle of truth. I simply gathered up a pile the facts and tried to fit them together.

In saying all this, I’m not suggesting that health IT industry research is a waste of time. If a report offers context, input from your peers and no-nonsense answers to questions you have, it may well be worth the price. But don’t let one of these firms sell you a bunch of hot air.

 

More Ways AI Can Transform Healthcare

Posted on April 25, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

You’ve probably already heard a lot about how AI will change healthcare. Me too. Still, given its potential, I’m always interested in hearing more, and the following article struck me as offering some worthwhile ideas.

The article, which was written by Humberto Alexander Lee of Tesser Health, looks at ways in which AI tools can reduce data complexity and detect patterns which would be difficult or even impossible for humans to detect.

His list of AI’s transformative powers includes the following:

  • Identifying diseases and providing diagnoses

AI algorithms can predict when people are likely to develop heart disease far more accurately than humans. For example, at Google healthcare technology subsidiary Verily, scientists created an algorithm that can predict heart disease by looking at the back of a person’s eyes and pinpoint early signs of specific heart conditions.

  • Crowdsourcing treatment options and monitoring drug response

As wearable devices and mobile applications mature, and data interoperability improves thanks to standards such as FHIR, data scientists and clinicians are beginning to generate new insights using machine learning. This is leading to customizable treatments that can provide better results than existing approaches.

  • Monitoring health epidemics

While performing such a task would be virtually impossible for humans, AI and AI-related technologies can sift through staggering pools of data, including government intelligence and millions of social media posts, and combine them with ecological, biogeographical and public health information, to track epidemics. In some cases, this process will predict health threats before they blossom.

  • Virtual assistance helping patients and physicians communicate clearly

AI technology can improve communication between patients and physicians, including by creating software that simplifies patient communication, in part by transforming complex medical terminology into digestible information. This helps patients and physicians engage in a meaningful two-way conversation using mobile devices and portals.

  • Developing better care management by improving clinical documentation

Machine learning technology can improve documentation, including user-written patient notes, by analyzing millions of rows of data and letting doctors know if any data is missing or clarification is needed on any procedures. Also, Deep Neural Network algorithms can sift through information in written clinical documentation. These processes can improve outcomes by identifying patterns almost invisible to human eyes.

Lee is so bullish on AI that he believes we can do even more than he has described in his piece. And generally speaking, it’s hard to disagree with him that there’s a great deal of untapped potential here.

That being said, Lee cautions that there are pitfalls we should be aware of when we implement AI. What risks do you see in widespread AI implementation in healthcare?

Dreaming BIG for Health IT – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on April 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 4/27 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Erica Johansen (@thegr8chalupa) on the topic of “Dreaming BIG for Health IT”.

I’m from Texas and Texas is known for BIG things. Big skies, big ranches, and big hair… “Everything is bigger in Texas,” after all. Texas is no stranger to big ideas either and some exciting things are taking place in the Lone Star State, even as it relates to health IT.

I will be hosting the chat from onsite at the Texas Regional HIMSS conference from Dallas. The conference is a BIG deal for folks in the Texas region, and thanks to the beauty of social media, the conversation doesn’t have to be local. We invite you to dream BIG and discuss what makes health IT an exciting industry to be a part of.

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we discuss the following:

T1: What ideas are we not thinking big enough about? Should we expand our thinking? #HITsm

T2: What are we thinking too big about and should we think smaller? #HITsm

T3: Are healthcare organizations becoming too big? Should we have smaller organizations or larger ones? #HITsm

T4: Is healthcare data big enough? Why? Why not? #HITsm

T5: Where do you look for big innovations in and out of healthcare? What do you foresee as a big influencer to the healthcare space in the coming years? #HITsm

Bonus: Dream big about healthcare technology – What big things do you see materializing in the future? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
5/4 – Organization Structure: Should We Break Up the Traditional Pyramid?
Hosted by David Chou (@dchou1107)

5/11 – Using Technology to Coordinate Care and Improve Outcomes in Behavioral Health
Hosted by Bryan Wempen (@bryanwempen) from Netsmart

5/18 – TBD
Hosted by Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell) from @GalenHealthcare

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Designing for the Whole Patient Journey: Lumeon Enters the US Health Provider Market

Posted on April 23, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Lots of companies strive to unshackle health IT’s potential to make the health care industry more engaging, more adaptable, and more efficient. Lumeon intrigues me in this space because they have a holistic approach that seems to be producing good results in the UK and Europe–and recently they have entered the US market.

Superficially, the elements of the Lumeon platform echo advances made by many other health IT applications. Alerts and reminders? Check. Workflow automation? Check. Integration with a variety of EHRs? Of course! But there is something more to Lumeon’s approach to design that makes it a significant player. I had the opportunity to talk to Andrew Wyatt, Chief Operating Officer, to hear what he felt were Lumeon’s unique strengths.

Before discussing the platform itself, we have to understand Lumeon’s devotion to understanding the patient’s end-to-end experience, also sometimes known as the patient journey. Lumeon is not so idealistic as to ask providers to consider a patient’s needs from womb to tomb–although that would certainly help. But they ask such questions as: can the patient physically get to appointments? Can she navigate her apartment building’s stairs and her apartment after discharge from surgery? Can she get her medication?

Lumeon workflow view

*Lumeon workflow view

Such questions are the beginning of good user experience design (UX), and are critical to successful treatment. This is why I covered the HxRefactored conference in Boston in 2016 and 2017. Such questions were central to the conference.

It’s also intriguing that criminal justice reformers focus attention on the whole sequence of punishment and rehabilitation, including reentry into mainstream society.

Thinking about every step of the patient experience, before and after treatments as well as when she enters the office, is called a longitudinal view. Even in countries with national health care systems, less than half the institutions take such a view, and adoption of the view is growing only slowly.

Another trait of longitudinal thinking Wyatt looks for is coordinated care with strong involvement from the family. The main problem he ascribed to current health IT systems is that they serve the clinician. (I think many doctors would dispute this, saying that the systems serve only administrators and payers–not the clinician or the patient.)

Here are a couple success stories from Wyatt. After summarizing them, I’ll look at the platform that made them possible.

Alliance Medical, a major provider of MRI scans and other imaging services, used Lumeon to streamline the entire patient journey, from initial referral to delivery of final image and report. For instance, an online form asks patients during the intake process whether the patient has metal in his body, which would indicate the use of an alternative test instead of an MRI. The next question then becomes what test would meet the current diagnostic needs and be reimbursed by the payer. Lumeon automates these logistical tasks. After the test, automation provided by the Lumeon platform can make sure that a clinician reviews the image within the required time and that the image gets to the people who need it.

Another large provider in ophthalmology looked for a way to improve efficiency and outcomes in the common disease of glaucoma, by putting images of the eye in a cloud and providing a preliminary, automated diagnosis that the doctor would check. None of the cloud and telemedicine solutions covered ophthalmology, so the practice used the Lumeon platform to create one. The design process functioned as a discipline allowing them to put a robust process for processing patients in place, leading to better outcomes. From the patient’s point of view, the change was even more dramatic: they could come in to the office just once instead of four times to get their diagnosis.

An imaging provider found that they wasted 5 to 10 minutes each time they moved a machine between an upper body position and a lower body position. They saved many hours–and therefore millions of dollars–simply by scheduling all the upper body scans for one part of the day and all lower body scans for another. Lumeon made this planning possible.

In most of the US, value-based care is still in its infancy. The longitudinal view is not found widely in health care. But Wyatt says his service can help businesses stuck in the fee-for-service model too. For example, one surgical practice suffered lots of delays and cancellations because the necessary paperwork wasn’t complete the day before surgery. Lumeon helped them build a system that knew what tests were needed before each surgery and that prompted staff to get them done on time. The system required coordination of many physicians and labs.

Another example of a solution that is valuable in fee-for-service contexts is creating a reminder for calling colonoscopy patients when they need to repeat the procedure. Each patient has to be called at a different time interval, which can be years in the future.

Lumeon has been in business 12 years and serves about 60 providers in the UK and Europe, some very large. They provide the service on a SaaS basis, running on a HIPAA-compliant AWS cloud except in the UK, where they run their own data center in order to interact with legacy National Health Service systems.

The company has encountered along the way an enormous range of health care disciplines, with organizations ranging from small to huge in size, and some needing only a simple alerting service while others re-imagined the whole patient journey. Wyatt says that their design process helps the care provider articulate the care pathway they want to support and then automate it. Certainly, a powerful and flexible platform is needed to support so many services. As Wyatt said, “Health care is not linear.” He describes three key parts to the Lumeon system:

  1. Integration engine. This is what allows them to interact with the EHR, as well as with other IT systems such as Salesforce. Often, the unique workflow system developed by Lumeon for the site can pop up inside the EHR interface, which is important because doctors hate to exit a workflow and start up another.

    Any new system they encounter–for instance, some institutions have unique IT systems they created in-house–can be plugged in by developing a driver for it. Wyatt made this seem like a small job, which underscores that a lack of data exchange among hospitals is due to business and organizational factors, not technical EHR problems. Web services and a growing support for FHIR make integration easier

  2. Communications. Like the integration engine, this has a common substrate and a multiplicity of interfaces so doctors, patients, and all those involved in the health care journey can use text, email, web forms, and mobile apps as they choose.

  3. Workflow or content engine. Once they learn the system, clinicians can develop pathways without going back to Lumeon for support. The body scan solution mentioned earlier is an example of a solution designed and implemented entirely by the clinical service on its own.

  4. Transparency is another benefit of a good workflow design. In most environments, staff must remember complex sequences of events that vary from patient to patient (ordering labs, making referrals, etc.). The sequence is usually opaque to the patient herself. A typical Lumeon design will show the milestones in a visual form so everybody knows what steps took place and what remain to be done.

Wyatt describes Lumeon as a big step beyond most current workflow and messaging solutions. It will be interesting to watch the company’s growth, and to see which of its traits are adopted by other health IT firms.

Smart Diagnosis Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on April 20, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and so it’s time for a little fun and humor to get your weekend started. This cartoon was shared by the one and only Eric Topol. As usual, it’s going to make some people really uncomfortable. However, it also illustrates a fascinating opportunity. Especially when you look at it from a crowdsourcing type of perspective. If you have the right crowd it’s a powerful idea even if this is illustrated in a pretty funny way.


GDPR and Why U.S. Healthcare Providers Should Care

Posted on April 19, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Steven Marco, CISA, ITIL, HP SA and President of HIPAA One®.

Steven Marco - HIPAA expertThe European Union (EU) has drafted guidance to give citizens more control over their personal data, so what does this mean for U.S. based healthcare providers?

On May 25, 2018, the EU will roll out General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a new set of rules that is similar in nature to HIPAA compliance for EU countries. The effort to create GDPR started years ago in January 2012, when the European Commission began working on plans to create data protection reform across the EU so that European countries would have greater controls in place to manage information in the digital age. Additionally, GDPR aims to simplify the regulatory environment for businesses so both European citizens and businesses can benefit from a digital economy.

Being that GDPR has not yet taken effect, there are aspects to this new framework that are difficult to fully understand and define at this time yet we do know that U.S. companies DO NOT need to have business operations in one of the 28-member states of the EU to be impacted by GDPR. The new set of rules will require organizations around the world that hold data belonging to individuals who live in the EU to a high level of protection and must be able to account for where every bit of data is stored.

The good news is a large majority of U.S. based healthcare providers will be relatively safe in terms of complying with GDPR. If your organization is not actively marketing your services in the EU or practicing in the EU, a data breach where an EU citizen’s PHI is compromised would most likely be your most realistic brush with GDPR.

For instance, a walk-clinic in New York City seeing many international tourists has a much higher chance of being impacted than say a rural clinic treating mostly local residents. Providers in larger cities with more diverse patient groups will need to be extra vigilant regarding their breach notification standards and security posture.

Want to learn more about how your healthcare organization can prepare for GDPR? Read this HIPAA One blog post to learn how your practice can prepare now for a more international data sharing climate.

About Steven Marco
Steven Marco is the President of HIPAA One®, leading provider of HIPAA Risk Assessment software for practices of all sizes.  HIPAA One is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA and the effort to make HIPAA compliance more accessible for all practices.  Are you HIPAA Compliant?  Take HIPAA One’s 5 minute HIPAA security and compliance quiz to see if your organization is risk or learn more at HIPAAOne.com.

London Doctors Stage Protest Over Rollout Of App

Posted on April 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

We all know that doctors don’t take kindly to being forced to use health IT tools. Apparently, that’s particularly the case in London, where a group of general practitioners recently held a protest to highlight their problems with a telemedicine app rolled out by the National Health Service.

The doctors behind the protest are unhappy with the way the NHS structured its rollout of the smartphone app GP at Hand, which they say has created extra work and confusion among the patients.

The service, which is run by UK-based technology company Babylon Health, launched in November of last year. Using the app, patients can either have a telemedicine visit or schedule an in-person appointment with a GP’s office. Telemedicine services are available 24/7, and patients can be seen in minutes in some cases.

GP at Hand seems to be popular with British consumers. Since its launch, over 26,000 patients have registered for the service, according to the NHS.

However, to participate in the service, patients are automatically de-registered from their existing GP office when they register for GP at Hand. Many patients don’t seem to have known this. According to the doctors at the protest, they’ve been getting calls from angry former patients demanding that they be re-registered with their existing doctor’s office.

The doctors also suggest that the service gets to cherry-pick healthier, more profitable patients, which weighs down their practice. “They don’t want patients with complex mental health problems, drug problems, dementia, a learning disability or other challenging conditions,” said protest organizer Dr. Jackie Applebee. “We think that’s because these patients are expensive.” (Presumably, Babylon is paid out of a separate NHS fund than the GPs.)

Is there lessons here for US-based healthcare providers? Perhaps so.

Of course, the National Health Service model is substantially different from the way care is delivered in this country, so the administrative challenges involved in rolling out a similar service could be much different. But this news does offer some lessons to consider nonetheless.

For one thing, it reminds us that even in a system much different than ours, financing and organizing telemedicine services can be fraught with conflict. Reimbursement would be an even bigger issue than it seems to have been in the UK.

Also, it’s also of note that the NHS and Babylon Health faced a storm of patient complaints about the way the service was set up. It’s entirely possible that any US-based efforts would generate their own string of unintended consequences, the magnitude which would be multiplied by the fact that there’s no national entity coordinating such a rollout.

Of course, individual health systems are figuring out how to offer telemedicine and blend it with access to in-person care. But it’s telling that insurers with a national presence such as CIGNA or Humana aren’t plunging into telemedicine with both feet. At least none of them have seen substantial success in their efforts. Bottom line, offering telehealth is much harder than it looks.

The Power of Story – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on April 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 4/20 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by @DesignInHealth (led by Kijana-Knight Torres), Burt Rosen (@burtrosen), and the #WTFix team on the topic of “The Power of Story”.

We are within one month of What’s the Fix? happening on May 17, 2018. What’s the Fix? (#WTFix) is a movement and an event that Healthsparq started in 2017 to help the industry learn from people. Most health care conferences focus on industry insiders talking to each other. What’s the Fix? highlights real people with real stories of overcoming health care challenges and driving change to the system as a result. The conference is about being human, being empathetic, and using story telling as a way to drive change in an industry that really needs help.

For the 2018 event, we’re excited to be accredited by Patients Included and to welcome new partners the Design Institute for Health at Dell Medical School. You can join the conference virtually for free, and new this year, we’ll also offer workshops on May 16th. If you LOVE the topic of story and want to learn more… One of the workshops is led by Kijana-Knight Torres of the Design Institute for Health is: “Lead with the Story: How to capture hearts, change minds, and inspire action.”

So let’s talk about the power of story.

There are numerous ways to convince people of our ideas. Stories have the power to open hearts and minds. Stories move people to action. Stories can help us breathe our intention into others so that they see what we see and feel what we feel. Stories can move people from “I know” to “I understand”.

Everyone has a story – yes even you! Your experience is the key to creating movement and change. Crafting compelling stories can enable people to escape their comfort zones and share a new perspective.

Let’s talk about what makes good stories tick and how stories help make meaningful connections with others, and how stories have the power to transform healthcare – and health.

A few of our favorite references on storytelling:

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we discuss the following:

T1: What makes a story compelling for you? #HITsm

T2: Has a story ever changed your mind or your perspective – or your health? #HITsm

T3: What’s the most effective way to share really personal stories on social media? #HITsm

T4: What fears arise when telling your story? #HITsm

T5: How can patients share their stories in a way that providers listen? What role does HIPAA play in patient storytelling? #HITsm

Bonus: You have the ear of people who can make change, what experience would you most like to transform through the power of story? Do you have one of these stories to share? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
4/27 – Dreaming BIG for Health IT
Hosted by Erica Johansen (@thegr8chalupa)

5/4 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

5/11 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

5/18 – TBD
Hosted by Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell) from @GalenHealthcare

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.