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Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/2 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora) on the topic “Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare.”

Machine learning is hitting a furious pace in the consumer world, where AI estimates how long your food will take to arrive and targets you with the purchases you can’t resist. This week, we’ll discuss the implications of this technology as we translate it to the healthcare ecosystem.

Current machine learning topics of interest to healthcare range from adaptive and behavior-based care delivery pathways to the regulation of so-called “black box” systems those that cannot easily explain the reasons with which they made a prediction.

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we discuss the following questions:

T1: The Machine Learning community is currently discussing FAT: Fairness, Accountability, & Transparency. What does this mean in healthIT? #HITsm

T2: How can machine learning integrate naturally in clinical and patient facing workflows? #HITsm

T3: What consumer applications of machine learning are best suited for transition to the healthcare setting? #HITsm

T4: The FDA regulates software AS a medical device and IN a medical device. How do you envision this distinction today, and do you foresee it changing? #HITsm

T5: What successes have you seen in healthcare machine learning? Are particular care settings better suited for ML? Where do you see that alignment? #HITsm

Bonus: Is there a place for machine learning black box predictions? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/9 – HIMSS Break – No #HITsm Chat

3/16 – TBD

3/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

The Real Problem with High Healthcare Costs

Posted on February 27, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The rising cost of healthcare in the U.S. is something that nearly everyone experiences on a regular basis. Looking at the trend over the last few decades, there is an eye-opening surge in cost. There’s a great article/table by Kimberly Amadeo that outlines health care costs by year from 1960 to 2015. The cost per person for health care in 1960 was $146. In 2015, the cost per person was $9,990, over 68 times higher than it was in 1960.

The trend shows no sign of slowing; 2018 costs have only gotten higher. The National Conference of State Legislatures cited a figure from a Kaiser Employer Survey stating that annual premiums reached $18,764 in 2017. Costs for people purchasing insurance on an exchange or privately increased even more.

Increasing healthcare costs impact everyone. Why have costs gotten so high? Wasn’t the Affordable Care Act supposed to make coverage more affordable? Instead, many are faced with even higher insurance premiums for themselves and their families. Sometimes that equates to having to make difficult choices in care. And should people have to decide whether or not they can afford to seek care or treatment?

Many people want to blame insurance companies or hospitals or lobbyists or politicians. In truth, it’s a complex issue. And one of the core reasons it’s so hard to dissect is that there is a real lack of data – cost and price information, and clinical information on care quality and outcomes. Nobody has all of the data in one place. Without all of the data, the real problem or problems can’t be seen. If a problem can be guessed, it can’t be fixed. As in the Wizard of Oz, the real drivers are lurking behind the curtain; worse, the data that describes the drivers is splintered and located in different places, waiting to be collected in a way that reveals the whole truth.

How can health IT help? Are there ways that we can help solve the data problem and reduce high healthcare costs? Electronic Health Records can help gather the data. Adding claims data to complete, longitudinal patient health records can also help. Connecting PHRs, EHRs, and claims data together can help bridge the data gaps and tell more of a complete story. Until we have that story, the industry will continue to operate in siloes. Costs will continue to rise. And people will have a harder time seeking out the care they need.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

How Not to Handle EHR Certification Problems

Posted on February 26, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I was thinking back on how differently EHR vendors have handled EHR Certification problems. First, take a look at the $155 million whistleblower lawsuit that eCW (eClinicalWorks) suffered thanks to improper EHR certification (amidst other things). They had to have known what they were doing and didn’t come clean.

$155 million is just the first price they had to pay. Since then, providers have filed a class action lawsuit against eCW and the family of a patient also filed a lawsuit against eCW. This a painful and expensive experience for eCW.

Anne Zieger reported in August last year that the eCW settlement hadn’t led to customer defections (yet?), but we’ll see how that plays out over time. It makes me wonder if the eCW founder, Girish Navani, still feels the same about never selling your EHR company. Maybe these lawsuits have made him wish he’d taken a buy out offer after all, but I digress.

Today I remembered a situation where another EHR vendor had issues with how their certified EHR attested to meaningful use data. It was back in 2011, so I’m pretty sure many of you have forgotten it. Plus, I expect many of you have forgotten it because the EHR vendor in this case took ownership of the error and fixed it. Of course, this EHR vendor hasn’t fared quite as well as eCW in the marketplace. However, their choice to hide their certification issue would have no doubt made their market position even worse.

The clear message I see in these two stories is something we see often in the US. If you own up to mistakes and do your best to make them right, humans are surprisingly forgiving. However, if you hide it, then the damage can often be much worse than the crime.

I also loved this question I asked back in 2011 about the meaningful use and EHR certification program which are still relevant today when it comes to these complex programs:

“If a large EHR vendor that’s intimately involved in the meaningful use rule creation process can mess up some of the meaningful use guidelines, how many other EHR vendors are going to do the same?”

I didn’t know about eCW’s issues back in 2011, but I obviously could see how easily the eCW issues could happen. Has anything changed with EHR certification and now MACRA and MIPS to make us think that this has gotten any better? Should we be asking, whose the next EHR vendor that will have issues? Will it be because of deliberate skirting of the law or just overly complex, unclear, and changing government requirements?

Yes, you can believe that I’m with those organizations that have called for an end to EHR certification. I’ve been against it since I first heard about it and still don’t see how it’s provided any value since. Pro-EMR I am. Pro-EMR Certification I am not.

Some Of The Questions I Plan To Ask At #HIMSS18

Posted on February 23, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As always, this year’s HIMSS event will feature enough noise, sound and color to overwhelm your senses for months afterward. And talk about a big space to tread — I’ve come away with blisters more than once after attending.

Nonetheless, in my book it’s always worth attending the show. While no one vendor or session might blow you away, finding out directly what trends and products generated the most buzz is always good. The key is not only to attend the right educational sessions or meet the right people but to figure out how companies are making decisions.

Below, here are some of the questions that I hope to ask (and hopefully find answers) at the show. If you have other questions to suggest I’d love to bring them with me to the show —  the way I see it, the more the merrier!

-Anne

Blockchain

Vendors:  What functions does blockchain perform in your solution and what are the benefits of these additions? What made that blockchain the best technology choice for getting the job done? What challenges have you faced in developing a platform that integrates blockchain technology, and how are you addressing them? Is blockchain the most cost-efficient way of accomplishing the task you have in mind? What problems is blockchain best suited to address?

Providers: Have you rolled out any blockchain-based systems? If you haven’t currently deployed blockchain technology, do you expect to do so the future? When do you think that will happen? How will you know when it’s time to do so? What benefits do you think it will offer to your organization, and why? Do you think blockchain implementations could generate a significant level of additional server infrastructure overhead?

AI

Vendors: What makes your approach to healthcare AI unique and/or beneficial?  What is involved in integrating your AI product or service with existing provider technology, and how long does it usually take? Do providers have to do this themselves or do you help? Did you develop your own algorithms, license your AI engine or partner with someone else deliver it? Can you share any examples of how your customers have benefited by using AI?

Providers: What potential do you think AI has to change the way you deliver care? What specific benefits can AI offer your organization? Do you think healthcare AI applications are maturing, and if not how will you know when they have? What types of AI applications potentially interest you, and are you pilot-testing any of them?

Interoperability

Vendors:  How does your solution overcome barriers still remaining to full health data sharing between all healthcare industry participants? What do you think are the biggest interoperability challenges the industry faces? Does your solution require providers to make any significant changes to their infrastructure or call for advanced integration with existing systems? How long does it typically take for customers to go live with your interoperability solution, and how much does it cost on average? In an ideal world, what would interoperability between health data partners look like?

Providers: Do you consider yourself to have achieved full, partial or little/no health data interoperability between you and your partners? Are you happy with the results you’ve gotten from your interoperability efforts to date? What are the biggest benefits you’ve seen from achieving full or partial interoperability with other providers? Have you experienced any major failures in rolling out interoperability? If so, what damage did they do if any? Do you think interoperability is a prerequisite to delivering value-based care and/or population health management?

What topics are you looking forward to hearing about at #HIMSS18? What questions would you like asked? Share them in the comments and I’ll see what I can do to find answers.

CES Really Scared Me. Will HIMSS Make Me Feel Any Better?

Posted on February 22, 2018 I Written By

Mike Semel is a noted thought leader, speaker, blogger, and best-selling author of HOW TO AVOID HIPAA HEADACHES . He is the President and Chief Security Officer of Semel Consulting, focused on HIPAA and other compliance requirements; cyber security; and Business Continuity planning. Mike is a Certified Business Continuity Professional through the Disaster Recovery Institute, a Certified HIPAA Professional, Certified Security Compliance Specialist, and Certified Health IT Specialist. He has owned or managed technology companies for over 30 years; served as Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a hospital and a K-12 school district; and managed operations at an online backup company.

Are Consumer Health Care Products Accurate & Safe Enough for Your Healthcare?

At CES, the monstrous electronics show, I saw lots of consumer devices advertised for personal fitness and healthcare. There was even a Digital Health Summit, with a wide range of industry experts.

Some companies were promoting their ability to send data to healthcare providers. That’s scary, since there are no standards governing many of these devices.

A clear message from CES is that the divisions between ‘technology’ and ‘devices’ are diminishing. Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, won’t be tied to stand-alone devices for long. They will be integrated into a wide range of consumer products across a home network, your car, portable devices, and the Internet. It’s not a big leap of the imagination to think that you will be telling Alexa, in your refrigerator, to reset the alarm clock in your bedroom, for an early meeting. And that Alexa will be telling you that you gained a pound, and send that data to your doctor.

Considering the recent news about Amazon getting into healthcare, with Warren Buffet and JP Morgan, it’s logical to think that Amazon will be delivering our healthcare along with our packages. Will you get a colonoscopy notification from Amazon because someone orders a 50th birthday card for you? (Will they only use lubricant if you have Prime? Ok, that might have been a little harsh.)

Loud and clear from CES is the consumerization of healthcare, and it’s scary.

Will data from your consumer products be accurate enough for a health care provider to form a professional opinion?

Will your devices be safe from hacking and interference?

Who will be liable if something bad happens to you because your data wasn’t accurate, or was delayed in transmission?

Should there be a government or industry-based organization setting standards and certifying devices?

ACCURACY

Valencell makes biometric sensor chips for companies to use in their consumer products. They displayed stylish brand-name smart watches that imbed their biometric-sensor chips.

Valencell’s President, Steven LeBoeuf, said that there are no standards for consumer heart monitors. His chips are voluntarily lab-tested and certified for accuracy. He said that some of their competitors’ products can confuse a person’s steps, as they are walking or running, as a heartbeat.

While that might not matter too much to a person casually checking their own vitals, what will happen if incorrect data is sent upstream to your healthcare provider?

This diagram, produced by iHealth, a company that makes ‘consumer-friendly, mobile personal healthcare products that connect to the cloud’, clearly shows their expectation that your data will be communicated to hospitals.

iHealth aptly describes this as a Systematic Framework. Think about how many vendors will be involved in the system. Device manufacturers, chip manufacturers, software designers, programmers, computer companies, communication networks, Internet service providers, cloud services, and more, all before data gets to the hospital.

What if there is a failure? What happens to you if your healthcare is depending on a consumer device? Who is responsible for the security and accuracy of the data through the system? Wanna bet that everyone will be pointing their finger at someone else?

SAFETY

What will protect you from your devices? There are an increasing numbers of stories of consumer products and autonomous cars – the Internet of Things (IoT) – being hacked.

In August, 2017, the FDA issued a warning that a pacemaker was vulnerable to hackers who could remotely kill the battery or modify the performance of the pacemaker. Killing the battery could kill the patient. Remember that this recall occurred because a pacemaker is a medical device governed by the FDA, which doesn’t govern consumer healthcare products.

The Equifax breach, the Spectre and Meltdown flaws in computer microchips, and hackers hijacking baby monitors and surveillance cameras, all show the importance of being able to apply software and firmware patches and updates.

It took a long time for the government to require car companies to recall vehicles for safety problems. How many people will be hurt, or die, before consumer health care products get regulated?

LIABILITY

At CES, AIG Insurance presented this graphic of survey results showing who is liable for a driverless vehicle crash.

Imagine personal injury attorneys salivating over consumer health care product failures. Imagine new types of insurance coverage – or new types of policy exceptions – related to managing healthcare based on consumer product data.

STANDARDS & REGULATIONS

What’s the difference between a medical device and a consumer health care product? What defines a heart monitor? How accurate is a scale? How will a consumer health care product receive security patches? How will consumers be notified their health care products aren’t safe?

Do we want the federal government involved? In 1966, the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act required auto manufacturers to notify the government and consumers of safety defects, and recall vehicles. Could our dysfunctional Congress ever agree on a plan to regulate consumer health care products?

What about the industry policing itself? At his annual briefing at CES, electronics industry veteran Shelly Palmer made his case for a Self-Regulatory Organization (SRO) to create and enforce standards to protect consumers from risks associated with the Internet of Things.

The model for this could be PCI-DSS, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards, that govern organizations that accept and process credit cards. This standard is self-regulated by a council founded by the credit card companies, and is not overseen by federal or state agencies. It covers credit card processing from end-to-end, from certifying the swipe device on the store’s counter all the way through the merchant processors and banks.

According to its website, the council “provides critical tools needed for implementation of the standards such as assessment and scanning qualifications, self-assessment questionnaires, training and education, and product certification programs.

If you are a healthcare professional, isn’t this the level of integrity and security you want for consumer products sending patient data to you?

Who would take on the responsibility, not to mention the liability, of policing consumer products sending data to healthcare organizations? The Consumer Technology Association (CTA), or the Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS)?

Will it take a disaster for us to find out?

Maybe I will find some answers at the HIMSS health IT conference. I sure hope so.

Three Pillars of Clinical Process Improvement and Control

Posted on February 21, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Brita Hansen, MD, Chief Medical Officer at LogicStream Health.

In a value-based care environment, achieving quality and safety measures is a priority. Health systems must have the capabilities to measure a process following its initial implementation. The reality, however, is that traditional improvement methods are often plagued with lagging indicators that provide little (if any) insight into areas requiring corrective actions. Health systems have an opportunity to make a significant impact on patient care by focusing on three pillars of clinical process improvement and control: quality and safety, appropriate utilization and clinician engagement.

Quality and Safety

Data in a health system’s electronic health record (EHR) typically is not easily accessible. Providers struggle to aggregate the data they need in a timely manner, often with limited resources, thereby hindering efforts to measure process efficacy and consistency. To achieve sustainable quality improvements, clinical leaders must equip their teams with advanced software solutions capable of delivering highly-actionable insights in near-real-time, thereby allowing them to gain a true understanding of clinical processes and how to avoid clinical errors and care variations.

Clinicians need instant insights into what clinical content in their EHR is being used; by whom; and how it affects patient care. This data empowers providers with the ability to continuously analyze and address care gaps and inefficient workflows.

For example, identifying inappropriate uses of Foley catheters that lead to catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) allows clinical leaders make targeted improvements to the care process or to counsel individual clinician outliers on appropriate best practices. This will, in turn, reduce CAUTI rates. To most effectively improve clinical processes, clinicians need software tools that enable them to examine those processes in their entirety, including process steps within the EHR, patient data and the actions of individual clinicians or groups as they interact with the care process every day.

Only with instant insight into how the care process is being followed can clinicians see in real-time what is happening and where to intervene, make the necessary changes in the EHR workflow, then measure and monitor the effects over time to improve care delivery in a sustainable way.

Appropriate Utilization

Verifying appropriate utilization of best practices also plays a critical role in optimizing clinical processes. Yet healthcare organizations often lack the ability to identify and correct the use of obsolete tests, procedures and medications. When armed with dynamic tools that quickly and easily allow any individual to understand the exact location of ordering opportunities for these components, an organization can evaluate its departments, clinicians, and patient populations for ineffective ordering patterns and areas that require greater compliance. By assessing areas in need of intervention, organizations can notify clinicians of the most up-to-date best practices that, when integrated into clinical workflows, will improve care and yield significant cost savings. Through targeted efforts to ensure proper usage of high-cost and high-volume medications, lab tests and other orderables, for example, health systems can achieve significant savings while improving the quality of care delivery.

The benefits of such an approach are reflected in one health system’s implementation of clinical process improvement and control software, which allowed them to more effectively manage the content in their EHR, including oversight of order sets. Specifically, the organization focused on reviewing the rate of tests used diagnose acute myocardial infarctions (heart attacks). It discovered that physicians were regularly ordering an outdated Creatine kinase-MB (CKMB) lab test along with a new, more efficient test for no other reason than it was pre-checked on numerous order sets.

Although the test itself was inexpensive, the high order rate led to massive waste and increased the cost of care. Leveraging the software enabled the organization to quickly identify the problem, then significantly reduce costs and save resources by eliminating an unnecessary test that otherwise would have remained hidden within the EHR.

Clinician Engagement

Enhancing clinician engagement is key to addressing dissatisfaction and burnout, often traced to alert fatigue and a lack of order set optimization within an EHR. The typical health system averages 24 million alert firings per year. Confronted with a high volume of unnecessary warnings, clinicians ignore alerts 49 percent to 96 percent of the time, resulting in poor compliance with care protocols. EHRs often contain an overwhelming number of order sets that can lead to confusion about best practices for patient care and a frustrating amount of choice to navigate. To increase engagement, alerts must be designed to send the right information, to the right person, in the right format, through the right channel, at the right time in the workflow; and order sets should be streamlined and make it easy for clinicians to follow the up-to-date best clinical practices.

For example, one hospital utilized EHR-generated alerts targeting potential cases of sepsis. These alerts, however, were rarely acted upon as they were not specific enough and fired inappropriately at such exhaustive rates clinicians grew to simply ignore them, creating a clear case of alert fatigue. By fine-tuning alerts and adjusting the workflow to ensure alerts were sent to the right clinician at the optimal time, the hospital was able to achieve and maintain nearly full compliance with its initiative. As early detection and treatment of sepsis increased, the hospital also reduced length of stay in its intensive care unit. Data-driven targeted interventions were developed to address outliers whose actions were driving unnecessary variation in the process.

Ultimately, when the three pillars—quality and safety, appropriate utilization and clinician engagement—are used as the building blocks for standardizing and controlling vital clinical processes, multiple objectives can be realized. Empowered with technology that supports these factors, healthcare organizations can truly achieve sustainable, proactive clinical process improvement and control.

Dr. Brita Hansen is a hospitalist at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. Dr. Hansen also serves as Chief Medical Officer of LogicStream Health.

We’re Talking #HIMSS18 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 20, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 2/23 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by the #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors. Appropriately so, we’ll be talking about the upcoming HIMSS 2018 annual conference.

While HIMSS18 is an exciting chance to bring the various communities within health IT together in one place, the sheer volume of conference offerings, social media activity, and attendees can quickly make the experience exhausting. Social media, if navigated thoughtfully, can make this experience even more enriching – whether you are joining your colleagues in Las Vegas or following along from home.

That’s why the #HITsm and #HIMSS18 Twitter communities will be coming together to discuss:

  • Market and technology trends to be on the lookout for via social media and from the conference itself
  • Tips & best practices to effectively manage your (social media) conference experience
  • Networking opportunities and how to best connect with colleagues onsite and via social media

The HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors will be in attendance for this chat to help share some of their social media savvy and conference expertise to guide you in your planning. The topics we will cover include:

T1: What #HIMSS18 conversations would signal positive trajectory for IT closing gaps in health(care) disparities? #HITsm

T2: With so much happening at #HIMSS18, what tips do you have to stay on top of relevant conversations and announcements to come out of the conference? #HITsm

T3: What emerging technologies (some of which will highlighted at #HIMSS18) give you hope for making positive change in health and care delivery? #HITsm

T4: If you were to launch a social media campaign at HIMSS18 to unearth challenges or highlight successes for health IT, what would it be and why? #HITsm

T5: What are the biggest pitfalls #HIMSS18 exhibitors succumb to when driving booth engagement? What advice do you have for them? #HITsm

T6: Who are you looking to meet at #HIMSS18 or connect with via social media and why? #HITsm

What other planning tips or questions do you have? Share them and connect with others using the #HITsm + #HIMSS18 hashtags on Twitter.

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

3/9 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Leadership and Learning – President’s Day

Posted on February 19, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s President’s Day in the US which means a lot of people have the day off from work and school. Unfortunately, in healthcare it’s largely just another day. My heart goes out to each of you who have to work today.

I started a tradition of posting quotes from past US Presidents on President’s Day and so I’m going to continue that tradition today. The following quote is from John F. Kennedy and is an important lesson for all the healthcare leaders out there.

Happy President’s Day!

Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level

Posted on February 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was looking through the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel and I realized that I did this video interview a few years back and never actually shared it here on EMR and HIPAA (I think I did share it a few other places).

The topic for the video discussion was healthcare communication and it included an all star lineup of people in the industry:

  • Jessica Johnson, Director of Operations, Health Transformation at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Population Health Management
  • Ethan Bechtel, CEO at OhMD
  • Nathan Larson, Chief Experience Officer at ImagineCare
  • Mandi Bishop, Healthcare Analyst
  • John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com

Healthcare Communication and engaging patients effectively has become a huge topic and these people were way ahead of the curve. Check out this video from a couple years ago to see what I mean:

What’s amazing is that a number of people in this video have moved on to new jobs, but they’re still part of the main healthcare IT community. Would be fun to get “the band” back together again and see what’s changed since this video and what’s still the same. Unfortunately, I think that much of it is still the same.

Practical Health IT Innovation Conference

Posted on February 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those regular readers, you’ve probably been seeing some of the promotion we’ve been doing for a new healthcare IT conference called Health IT Expo. Yes, this is our first time hosting a healthcare IT Conference of our own, but we are in our 5th year organizing the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference. While we attend and enjoy attending ~30 healthcare IT conferences per year, we think there’s something missing in these conferences that we can address at Health IT Expo.

Hundreds of people over the years have suggested that we should host our own healthcare IT conference. I’d always resisted doing so because I didn’t want to just create another me too conference. In many ways, it felt like there were enough conferences. However, having attended hundreds of conference over the years, I realized that something really big was missing at these conferences: practical innovation.

Most healthcare IT conferences are short on practical innovation and long on useless platitudes.

Last month I wrote that Health IT Expo was the Anti Moonshot Conference. Not that there’s anything wrong with people working on moonshot ideas. That’s a lot of fun and really exciting. However, if you’re a healthcare IT professional that’s overwhelmed by operational minutiea, listening to moonshot ideas ends up leaving you empty and longing for practical innovations that can improve your work life.

Long story short, we’ll be focusing the conference on the following 5 areas of healthcare IT innovation to start:

  • Security and Privacy
  • Analytics
  • Communication and Patient Engagement
  • IT Dev Ops
  • Operational Alignment and Support

We want to take everything we’ve learned attending conferences and organizing one for 5 years and make Health IT Expo a one of a kind experience for those working in these 5 areas.

As part of this conference, we also want to extend the innovation that’s shared over the 2 day event well beyond the conference. One of the other major challenges in healthcare IT is that innovations aren’t shared between organizations. Unlike healthcare data, we don’t mind sharing innovations in healthcare IT. However, there hasn’t been a great platform for this sharing.

For example, how does an IT professional at a hospital share a unique way they implemented 1000 new virtual desktops and saved their organization time and money? The sad answer is they don’t. How does a healthcare IT professional learn about a new company that can solve their physician communication problems? In many cases they don’t.

One of our goals is to use Healthcare Scene and this new conference to create a platform for innovation sharing. As a simple example, we’re finalizing resource pages around each of the 5 topics listed above. These pages will list companies that are innovating in each spaceso they’re easy to find. I’ve been blogging for 12 years and published over 12,000 blog posts and even I was surprised by some of the companies we found. We’ll do a future post linking to those pages once they’re published.

At the end of the day, we have one major goal. How can we make healthcare IT professionals lives better so we improve healthcare?

If that goal interests you, take a minute to check out Health IT Expo. If you’re a healthcare IT professional that wants to be part of this community, reach out to us on our contact us page. Share your experience with us and we’ll give you a special discount code to attend the conference where it doesn’t break your budget.