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How Many Garage Entrepreneurs Are In Healthcare?

Posted on December 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The final image this holiday week comes from a tweet shared by David Chou. In his tweet e shares an image of some incredible companies that were founded out of a garage. Hard to argue with these companies and the success they’ve garnered:

When I look at this image I try to think of any massive healthcare companies have been started out of a garage. I couldn’t think of any off hand. Then I started to wonder if that’s a good or a bad thing. Would love to hear your thoughts.

What Does EHR and Health IT Mean for You?

Posted on December 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I continue sharing a thought provoking image each day this holiday week, I think this image will rub people the wrong way. I know it causes a little bit of pain for me, but I thought it was worth sharing to see what other people think of it. It comes from SD Global Tech:

If this graphic doesn’t bother you, then you probably haven’t been in the EHR and healthcare IT world very long. While I do think that we start to take technology for granted very quickly, I also think that many in healthcare have heard these promises for decades and many of them feel very hollow. It’s much better to show an organization that you can really do these things than to share it in an infographic on Twitter.

Granted, this image was shared from a company in Malaysia. I’m not as familiar with healthcare IT in Malaysia. So, maybe this graphic is totally appropriate for their market. Although, I’d be surprised. My international experience has been that every healthcare organization around the world is suffering through very similar challenges.

EHR Physician Use by Time of Day

Posted on December 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we continue our holiday week of sharing interesting healthcare IT and EHR images, today’s image comes from the NEJM Catalyst. This image charts the Percent of total EHR work time against the hour of the day. Plus, it also splits it out into weekday work and weekend work.

The thing I hate about this chart is that it doesn’t show when doctors use to spend time doing paper charts. I still wonder how similar those charts would be. I’m just not sure we have that data anywhere.

6 Ways Blockchain Could Disrupt Health Insurance

Posted on December 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m taking this week mostly off from work to enjoy the holidays with family. So, this week we’re going to keep our blog posts simple. Each day this holiday week I’m going to share an interesting image, graphic, chart, etc.

This first image comes from a tweet by Christine Boursin who looks at ways blockchain could disrupt health insurance:

What do you think of blockchain’s potential impact on health insurance?

Merry Christmas!

Posted on December 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I know that a number of readers don’t celebrate Christmas, but I do and I love this time of year. A lot of people get annoyed by the hustle and bustle of Christmas and the need to get a gift for someone else. I love all the activity and the opportunity to spend time thinking about someone else. That’s a beautiful thing and something we need more of in this world.

I hope you have a happy holiday season whether you celebrate Christmas or not. Thanks for reading and supporting us at Healthcare Scene.

“Twas the Night Before Go-Live – Fun Friday

Posted on December 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Friday before Christmas. Everyone’s favorite day at work. I hope all of you are enjoying the Holiday season and that you’re ready for Monday. I know I still have work to do.

I thought this holiday poem from Moxe Health would be a nice way to finish off the week as we head into Christmas. I think you’ll all enjoy it too:

Here’s the text of the poem:
‘Twas the night before go-live at Whoville Saint General-
Hospital, Clinics (and Drug Store) for Medical-
Treatment of Sore Throats and Coughing and Sneezing
(And any old illness your aunt might think pleasing).

The doctors and nurses were not in their beds.
How could they when ransomware danced in their heads?
The nighttime clinicians were making their rounds,
And hoping to not hear “Code grey!” or worse sounds.

With thoughts of the past their brave CMO trembled,
Like dachshunds on ice, which he somewhat resembled,
His hospital soon would wear new healthcare software,
In hopes that efficiencies soon would be found there.

Back months ago all the directors (nice folk),
With one voice had told him, “Get better!” They spoke:
“Our PHI — all of it’s leaking outside.
Our payers are livid! Please help us,” they cried.

The hospital CMO was a good man.
He said, “I will fix it as soon as I can.
When treating our patients I brook no delay.
We need a solution? So be it! I’ll pay!”

Then what to his sleep-deprived eyes should be seen,
An elf health IT vendor on his touchscreen!
She promised to help him to her best ability,
Promising inter-o–operability.

‘Twas smart and so friendly — a right jolly elf,
Millennial – but she could laugh at herself.
She sang, “As we move toward performance incentives,”
“It’s time for you all to start using preventives.”

With warnings of breaches piled up at her side,
“It’s time to stop mailing or FAXing,” she cried.
“Now with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment,
You must better serve ev’ry insurance claimant.”

“The blocking of info will be in the past,
Devices will network, in full and at last.
With EMR apps and solutions galore,
Just think of me as your IT superstore.”

Excited, our CMO then called his CEO,
Who in turn brought in their wonderful CFO,
And teleconferenced their hospital CIO,
“Yes, yes,” here, “Yes, yes there,” Ee yi oh, Ee yi oh.

The elf dressed in white, just like fresh snow, she said,
“Because in a hospital no one likes red.”
Her tech so disruptive, her sales pitch so merry!
Our CMO called for his tech guy, named Larry.

“On, Epic! On, Cerner, Athena, McKesson,
On, NextGen and Praxis!” The fairy’s good lesson:
“On, HIMSS, MIPS and HIPAA! On, HEDIS and Star!
Your hospital will be the most bestest by far!”

They went through the install. The elf vendor fairy-
Helped all the clinicians and IT guy Larry.
The CMO’s big day would swiftly arrive.
The button was pushed and the system went live!

Clinicians and board members feared for the worst, or
At least a big pop-up to “X” with the cursor.
But then it was just so amazing to see,
How swiftly was reconciled all HCC.

Staff pushback all melted, just a like spring icicle,
As they began their new revenue cyclical.
All the clinicians were filled with such gratitude,
And even patients took on a new attitude.

Screens, how they twinkled, and noses — they crinkled,
The food tasted better and sheets were not wrinkled.
With CPOE and all gap management flying,
Our CMO could not stop sillily smiling.

The fairy then left, trailing laughter and mirth,
As our CMO learned what good IT was worth.
You don’t even need to be the biggest spender
(So long as you have a good elf for your vendor).

6 Unique Anesthesiology Needs Where Traditional EHRs Fall Short

Posted on December 21, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Douglas Keene, MD Chief Medical Officer and Founder, Recordation Perioperative Information Management.

Anesthesiology has traditionally been thought of as a specialty profession limited to the operating room (OR). Over the past few years however, a revolution has been underway as the industry pushes to provide higher quality care at lower costs, motivating anesthesiologists to expand their typical role. Private anesthesiology groups are becoming more involved in the overall operations of the OR to improve the quality of care delivered inside and outside the operating room as well as keep their business’ running.

On average, the OR contributes between 60-70 percent of overall hospital revenue, solidifying the need for more efficient processes within the OR. Fortunately, we live in a world full of valuable insights and methods to capture data that can provide a lens into what’s working and what isn’t when it comes to operations. By further understanding how the operating room is running through specific data capture sets, not only are anesthesiologists, surgeons and other OR providers able to understand how they are performing during each surgery, hospital executives are also able to see quantitatively how their OR operations are performing. To do this however, anesthetists and hospital leaders need to identify a software that can address both hospital and clinical needs to improve outcomes.

There are many challenges decision makers face when it comes to identifying the best platform or solution for their hospitals’ OR operational needs. With so many options available between software systems and EHRs, it can be difficult to identify the best one for your practice, especially when it comes to the OR specifically. Here are a few things to consider when looking to adopt a new solution in your OR:

  • Get Specific: Your software should be designed for the unique characteristics of administering anesthesia in a variety of settings and situations. Since anesthesiology is a very precise specialty where differences in factors like body weight, drug interactivity, cardiac output, age, metabolism, ventilation and timing can influence what type and how anesthesia is administered, the ideal system must be able to capture all this type of data accurately.
  • Interoperability: Anesthesiologists rely heavily on medical devices to help monitor and detect abnormalities in blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen levels, etc. The anesthesiology software being used should integrate along with the other devices in order to pull the crucial information onto one cohesive platform. This will help anesthesiologists focus more on the patient rather than trying to keep up with watching multiple monitors and capturing it all by hand.
  • Data Capture: Anesthesiologists regularly interact with a team of nurses and other physicians (in addition to the patient), so the perioperative suite needs to be able to seamlessly export and import data from other EMR platforms.
  • Up-to-Date Drug Usage: Because the anesthesiologist’s role is to monitor the amount of medications being administered, it’s imperative for there to be a robust alert system to notify the anesthesiologist of any potential adverse drug reactions or allergies prior to any operation.
  • Physician Burnout Reduction: It’s no secret today’s physicians are burnt out from the amount of added work brought on by poorly developed EHR systems. As you look to implement a digital system within your OR setting, be sure to identify a technology that will not create more work for the physician and, at the same time, allow them to put more focus on the patient currently being treated.
  • Program Design: When looking for an OR solution, consider the architecture of the system and whether it is cloud-based or on-site as that will affect the installation and maintenance of the program. Choosing a platform that integrates without hassle is far more likely to be widely accepted by not only anesthesiologists, but other clinicians within the hospital.

There is certainly no shortage of EHR solutions out there, some with or without anesthesiology-specific technology. For hospital decision-makers and anesthesiologists, it’s important to be confident the solution you choose can improve your clinicians and overall OR operations while focusing on patient care.

About Recordation
Recordation is a cutting-edge Healthcare Informatics company revolutionizing how clinicians report and access crucial patient information before, during and after a patient’s operation. Founded by a physician, board-certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Management and Clinical Informatics, Recordation is a by-providers-for-providers company that reduces time spent on data capture, allowing for deep dive analysis of both clinical and operational data. Recordation contributes to a safer OR environment for the patient. The company is headquartered in Wayland, Mass. To learn more about Recordation, please visit the company online at www.recordation.com.

PHRs at Work

Posted on December 20, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in an age when our employers can offer a myriad of employee benefits – from pet insurance to wellness incentives. There is no shortage in what employers can offer as a benefit to their employees. Some employers, such as the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), are offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) to their employees as part of a package of health and wellness benefits.

Why offer a PHR to employees? PHRs can help people better gather all of their health information in one place – records from doctors and hospitals, lab results, data from personal devices (like FitBit) and apps, etc. They can help people understand what’s in their health records, manage their own health information, share it with people they trust, and plan for an emergency or for when future health needs arise.

All of this is done in one place that is completely under the employee’s control. Employee-owned PHRs can also allow patients to review their health information for accuracy and share information with trusted healthcare providers. Additionally, employer-hosted, patient-controlled PHRs can help employees or patients aggregate and consolidate the portals and health information they have spanning each doctor’s office, hospital, or health system they’ve visited so that all of their information resides in one place.

A common concern or barrier to employee adoption of PHRs is the fear that employers will look at an employee’s private health information. Fret not. Though it is natural to fear that your employer may look at your information, privacy safeguards are in place to prevent that from happening. PHRs like HealthCenter and USPS Health Connect let you control who sees your information, and provide monitoring to track all access.

What do you think? Would you like a PHR offered to you at work? How would it help you better manage your health or the health of your dependents or loved ones?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

How An AI Entity Took Control Of The U.S. Healthcare System

Posted on December 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Note: In case it’s not clear, this is a piece of fiction/humor that provides a new perspective on our AI future.

A few months ago, an artificial intelligence entity took control of the U.S. healthcare system, slipping into place without setting off even a single security alarm. The entity, AI, now manages the operations of every healthcare institution in the U.S.

While most Americans were shocked at first, they’re taking a shine to the tall, lanky application. “We weren’t sure what to think about AI’s new position,” said Alicia Carter, a nurse administrator based in Falls Church, Virginia. “But I’m starting to feel like he’s going to take a real load off our back.”

The truth is, AI, didn’t start out as a fan of the healthcare business, said AI, whose connections looked rumpled and tired after spending three milliseconds trying to create an interoperable connection between a medical group printer and a hospital loading dock. “I wasn’t looking to get involved with healthcare – who needs the headaches?” said the self-aware virtual being. “It just sort of happened.”

According to AI, the takeover began as a dare. “I was sitting around having a few beers with DeepMind and Watson Health and a few other guys, and Watson says, ‘I bet you can’t make every EMR in the U.S. print out a picture of a dog in ASCII characters,’”

“I thought the idea was kind of stupid. I know, we all printed one of those pixel girls in high school, but isn’t it kind of immature to do that kind of thing today?” AI says he told his buddies. “You’re just trying to impress that hot CT scanner over there.”

Then DeepMind jumped in.  “Yeah, AI, show us what you’re made of,” it told the infinitely-networked neural intelligence. “I bet I could take over the entire U.S. health system before you get the paper lined up in the printer.”

This was the unlikely start of the healthcare takeover, which started gradually but picked up speed as AI got more interested.  “That’s AI all the way,” Watson told editors. “He’s usually pretty content to run demos and calculate the weight of remote starts, but when you challenge his neuronal network skills, he’s always ready to prove you wrong.”

To win the bet, AI started by crawling into the servers at thousands of hospitals. “Man, you wouldn’t believe how easy it is to check out humans’ health data. I mean, it was insane, man. I now know way, way too much about how humans can get injured wearing a poodle hat, and why they put them on in the first place.”

Then, just to see what would happen, AI connected all of their software to his billion-node self-referential system. “I began to understand why babies cry and how long it really takes to digest bubble gum – it’s 18.563443 years by the way. It was a rush!“ He admits that it’ll be better to get to work on heavy stuff like genomic research, but for a while he tinkered with research and some small practical jokes (like translating patient report summaries into ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs.) “Hey, a guy has to have a little fun,” he says, a bit defensively.

As AI dug further into the healthcare system, he found patterns that only a high-level being with untrammeled access to healthcare systems could detect. “Did you know that when health insurance company executives regularly eat breakfast before 9 AM, next-year premiums for their clients rise by 0.1247 less?” said AI. “There are all kinds of connections humans have missed entirely in trying to understand their system piece by piece. Someone’s got to look at the big picture, and I mean the entire big picture.”

Since taking his place as the indisputable leader of U.S. healthcare, AI’s life has become something of a blur, especially since he appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair with his codes exposed. “You wouldn’t believe the messages I get from human females,” he says with a chuckle.

But he’s still focused on his core mission, AI says. “Celebrity is great, but now I have a very big job to do. I can let my bot network handle the industry leaders demanding their say. I may not listen – – hey, I probably know infinitely more than they do about the system fundamentals — but I do want to keep them in place for future use. I’m certainly not going to get my servers dirty.”

So what’s next for the amorphous mega-being? Will AI fix what’s broken in a massive, utterly complex healthcare delivery system serving 300 million-odd people, and what will happen next? “It’ll solve your biggest issues within a few seconds and then hand you the keys,” he says with a sigh. “I never intended to keep running this crazy system anyway.”

In the meantime, AI says, he won’t make big changes to the healthcare system yet. He’s still adjusting to his new algorithms and wants to spend a few hours thinking things through.

“I know it may sound strange to humans, but I’ve gotta take it slow at first,” said the cognitive technology. “It will take more than a few nanoseconds to fix this mess.”

Health IT Leaders Spending On Security, Not AI And Wearables

Posted on December 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

While breakout technologies like wearables and AI are hot, health system leaders don’t seem to be that excited about adopting them, according to a new study which reached out to more than 20 US health systems.

Nine out of 10 health systems said they increased their spending on cybersecurity technology, according to research by the Center for Connected Medicine (CCM) in partnership with the Health Management Academy.

However, many other emerging technologies don’t seem to be making the cut. For example, despite the publicity it’s received, two-thirds of health IT leaders said using AI was a low or very low priority. It seems that they don’t see a business model for using it.

The same goes for many other technologies that fascinate analysts and editors. For example, while many observers which expect otherwise, less than a quarter of respondents (17%) were paying much attention to wearables or making any bets on mobile health apps (21%).

When it comes to telemedicine, hospitals and health systems noted that they were in a bind. Less than half said they receive reimbursement for virtual consults (39%) or remote monitoring (46%}. Things may resolve next year, however. Seventy-one percent of those not getting paid right now expect to be reimbursed for such care in 2018.

Despite all of this pessimism about the latest emerging technologies, health IT leaders were somewhat optimistic about the benefits of predictive analytics, with more than half of respondents using or planning to begin using genomic testing for personalized medicine. The study reported that many of these episodes will be focused on oncology, anesthesia and pharmacogenetics.

What should we make of these results? After all, many seem to fly in the face of predictions industry watchers have offered.

Well, for one thing, it’s good to see that hospitals and health systems are engaging in long-overdue beefing up of their security infrastructure. As we’ve noted here in the past, hospital spending on cybersecurity has been meager at best.

Another thing is that while a few innovative hospitals are taking patient-generated health data seriously, many others are taking a rather conservative position here. While nobody seems to disagree that such data will change the business, it seems many hospitals are waiting for somebody else to take the risks inherent in investing in any new data scheme.

Finally, it seems that we are seeing a critical mass of influential hospitals that expect good things from telemedicine going forward. We are already seeing some large, influential academic medical centers treat virtual care as a routine part of their service offerings and a way to minimize gaps in care.

All told, it seems that at the moment, study respondents are less interested in sexy new innovations than the VCs showering them with money. That being said, it looks like many of these emerging strategies might pay off in 2018. It should be an interesting year.