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Nursing and Healthcare Reform Cartoons – Fun Friday

Posted on June 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time again for some Fun Friday cartoons. This week’s comics are more general healthcare cartoons, but they were both too funny to not share. I hope you enjoy them.

If you don’t love nurses, then we can’t be friends. They are some of the most amazing people in the world and undervalued and underappreciated in healthcare.

This one might be a little too close to home for many in the current healthcare reform environment. Humor that borders on reality are my favorite.

Providers Work To Increase Patient Payments By Improving RCM Operations

Posted on June 29, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A growing body of research on healthcare payment trends is underscoring a painful fact: that consumers are footing a steadily growing share of their medical bills, and sometimes failing to pay. In response, providers are upgrading their revenue cycle management systems and tightening up their collections processes.

A new analysis by payment services vendor InstaMed has concluded that consumer spending on healthcare services should grow to $608 billion by 2019. This is a fairly substantial number even given the high volume of U.S. healthcare spending, which hit $3.4 trillion in 2016.

The growth in patient spending has been fueled by the emergence of high-deductible health plans, which are saddling consumers with increasingly large financial obligations. According to CMS figures cited in the report, the average deductible for covered workers with single coverage has doubled over the past several years, from $735 in 2010 to $1.487 in 2016.

But despite the increasing importance of consumers as healthcare payers, providers don’t seem to be doing enough to inform them about costs. More than 90% of consumers would like to know what the payment responsibility is prior to a provider visit, but they often don’t find out what they owe until they get a bill. What makes things worse is that very few consumers (7%) even know what a deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum are, so they’re ill-prepared to understand bills when they receive them, studies have found.

Providers are waiting longer to collect what they are owed by patients, with three-quarters waiting a month or longer to collect outstanding balances from patients. And problems with collecting patient accounts are getting worse over time.  In fact, a new study from TransUnion Healthcare found that about 68% of patients with bills of $500 or less didn’t pay off the full balance during 2016, up from 49% in 2014.

Meanwhile, patient financial responsibility for care has risen from 10% to 30% of costs over the last few years, with more increases likely. This has led to expanding levels of consumer bad debt for medical expenses.

In attempt to cope with these issues, providers are buying new revenue cycle management systems. A survey released last year by Black Book Research, which included 5,000 management and user-level RCM clients, found that many healthcare organizations are rethinking RCM technology and demanding better performance.

Forty-eight percent of responding CFOs told Black Book that they weren’t sure they had the budget they needed to upgrade to an end-to-end RCM system this year.  Nonetheless, 93% of CFOs said they planned to eliminate RCM vendors, financial and coding technology firms, that are not producing a return on investment, up from 79% with similar plans in Q4 2015.

In addition to investing in newer RCM technology, providers are making it easier for patients to pay via whatever medium they choose. Not only are providers issuing bill reminders via text, and accepting payments online and by phone, they’re also adding new channels like PayPal payments, bank transfers and mobile payments.

The New Leadership Agenda: 6 Effective Strategies for Driving the Adoption of Healthcare Technology – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on June 28, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Heather Haugen, PhD, Managing Director and CEO at The Breakaway Group (A Conduent Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Heather Haugen
In executive conference rooms around the country, a common dialogue is emerging. In the wake of multi-million-dollar investments in electronic health record (EHR) systems, healthcare leaders are admitting that they underestimate the “care and feeding” of adopting these new applications. Whether this realization occurs from implementing a new system for the first time, or replacing an existing legacy application, the challenges are largely the same. Change fatigue, resource shortages, user resistance, workarounds, patient safety concerns – all reflect barriers healthcare leaders face adopting new healthcare technology.

But there is good news for healthcare leaders. This month marks the release of the new edition of Beyond Implementation: A Prescription for the Adoption of Healthcare Technology. The book offers healthcare leaders a playbook for approaching and leading the effort to adopt clinical information systems.

The book explores several important leadership strategies that have proven invaluable to healthcare executives around the country.

Strategy #1: Establish a New Leadership Agenda

Leadership is the most fundamental driver of EHR adoption. Because of its importance to the success of the initiative, leaders must relentlessly commit to making EHR adoption a daily priority for executive teams. This includes focusing on the factors that drive optimal use of clinical information systems long after the implementation.

Strategy #2: Stop Doing List

Time is a scarce and vital asset for every executive team, which faces a host of competing priorities and time-sensitive initiatives. The most successful leadership teams prioritize the right projects that add the most value to the organization. One strategy is to develop a Stop Doing List, a concept popularized by renowned author Jim Collins. The Stop Doing List is the process of choosing which initiatives to stop in order to focus on the most crucial activities. For healthcare leaders, this means eliminating or reprioritizing enough projects to make EHR adoption among the top three priorities for the organization. To develop a Stop Doing List, Beyond Implementation recommends prioritizing initiatives per these criteria:

  • Projects/meetings that do not directly affect quality of care or safety
  • Projects/meetings that are not related to compliance or legal risk
  • Projects that can be delayed with little overall impact
  • Meetings that can be eliminated or consolidated

Strategy #3: Engage Clinical Leadership

Providers carry a powerful voice in a healthcare setting. Leaders must actively engage providers and promote their buy-in through several strategies. One strategy includes developing a provider council. Including representation from across the organization, endorsement from top leadership, and a formal charter and vision for the body, this council should oversee and govern EHR use.  Another strategy is to engage members of the council to serve as champions of the effort by helping their departmental colleagues and serving as an extension of leadership.

Strategy #4: Create a Tone at the Top

Crucial to engaging users in the effort is establishing a tone that emphasizes EHR adoption. Leadership must promote awareness of the initiative by creating a value proposition and brand that connects the EHR system with the organizational vision and mission. Leadership must also establish a rhythm with their messaging and ensure it remains authentic when interacting with users. Leadership should make it a focus to answer key questions about the transition, such as how EHR adoption improves clinical and financial outcomes and how the change will affect users individually. Establishing the importance of the effort, as well as being open and transparent, helps users navigate and accept the transition more easily.

Strategy #5: Governance

Governance is also another key ingredient of effective leadership. Competing interests, differing opinions, and varying experiences all pose barriers to EHR adoption. Leadership must develop a well-defined governance process, which overcomes these barriers by creating policies and procedures that hold users accountable and define expectations and best practices around use of the system. The governance process should evolve over time to address the evolving needs of users as they adopt the application. After developing the governance process, leadership must measure its effectiveness to enforce accountability and make continuous improvements.

Strategy #6: Track Performance Metrics to Drive Continuous Improvements

To improve outcomes, leadership must track the clinical and financial results of EHR adoption. Leadership should identify, select, and empower the right individuals to lead this effort. These individuals should collect, analyze, and report performance metrics that are important to caregivers and will motivate engagement and improvement.

To see improved clinical and financial outcomes, healthcare leaders must ignite and sustain the movement toward the adoption of clinical information systems. It starts with establishing a new leadership agenda that places adoption at the forefront of organizational priorities and continues through strategies that facilitate engagement, communication, governance, and measurement. When leaders engage in these activities, adoption becomes a pervasive mindset across the organization for optimal results.

Conduent is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training. Download their Free Whitepaper “Leadership Insights: Gaining Value from Technology Investments.”

EHR Optimization – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/30 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell) and Julie Champagne (@JulieEChampagne) from @GalenHealthcare on the topic of “EHR Optimization.”


Healthcare information technology witnessed a wave of implementation, where the promise of efficiency gains and meaningful use incentives drove adoption of Electronic Health Records. As most Healthcare Delivery Organizations (HDOs) now have an EHR in place, it’s becoming clear that the traditional arguments for EHR implementation are insufficient to maximize return on technology investments.  As EHR adoption approaches maximum levels, HDOs are refining EHR strategy from a short-term clinical documentation data repository to a long-term asset with substantial functionality surrounding clinical decision support, health maintenance planning and quality reporting. In fact, according to a recent survey conducted by KPMG, in collaboration with CHIME, 38% of the 112 respondents ranked EMR/EHR optimization as their top choice for where they plan the majority of capital investment over the next three years.

Further, as the capabilities and sophistication of EHRs continue to grow, there is a widening divide between healthcare organizations that harness the capabilities for a competitive advantage and those that are crippled by poor usability, workflows and adoption. Capturing information is only the most basic feature of an EHR. HDOs should ensure the EHR is positioned to be flexible and extensible to adopt emerging technologies driving insight to the point of care. Thus, tremendous opportunity exists for EMR clinically and operationally oriented optimization to generate additional margin, ease the burden on providers, and improve care HDOs must refine their EHR strategy. In this tweetchat, we’ll weigh EHR optimization against replacement, discuss EHR optimization opportunities and barriers, and consider EHR optimization levers, effort, KPIs, and ROI.

Resources and Other EHR Optimization Reading:

  1. EHR Optimization Whitepaper
  2. EHR Optimization Infographic
  3. EHR Clinical Optimization Toolkit
  4. Achieving Clinical System ROI Through EHR Optimization, Replacement & Portfolio Rationalization
  5. Healthcare CIOs Focus On Optimizing EMRs
  6. Has Electronic Health Record Replacement Failed?
  7. EHR Implementation Accomplished – What’s Next?

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat focused on EHR Optimization. We’ll use the following 6 questions as the framework for the discussion:

This Week’s Topics
T1: How did the big-bang implementation approaches contribute to EMR inefficiencies and what can be done to mitigate? #HITsm

T2: What is it about current EMR technology that contributes directly to physician inefficiency? #HITsm

T3: How do you get providers engaged in an optimization initiative if they are disenchanted with the product and suffering from burnout? #HITsm

T4: How can clinical workflows be adjusted to improve physician-patient interactions by removing EHR technology and data entry as an obstacle to F2F interaction? #HITsm

T5: What are the most common barriers to EHR optimization and how are they overcome? #HITsm

Bonus: What amount (if any) of ROI should HDOs expect from EHR optimization and is it worth the effort? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
7/7 – International EHR Adoption: Challenges and Solutions
Hosted by Stefan Buttigieg, MD (@stefanbuttigieg)

7/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

7/21 – Meeting the Patient Where They Are
Hosted by Melody Smith Jones (@MelSmithJones) from HYP3R

7/28 – How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching?
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@leachatham) from @SolutionReach

8/4 – TBD
Hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela) from Airstrip

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Should We Even Need to Debate EHR Interoperability?

Posted on June 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I saw this tweet from Former AMA president and emergency Physician, Steven J. Stack, and the way he phrased it really struck me:

Do we really need to debate EHR interoperability? A debate would assume that some people think that interoperability is a bad idea. I have yet to meet someone that says that healthcare shouldn’t have EHR data interoperability. Unlike a lot of things happening in healthcare, everyone can see the value of sharing healthcare data.

The only arguments I’ve ever seen against EHR data sharing come from privacy and security advocates that suggest that sharing EHR data can go to far. Reminds me of the cartoon I saw that said something like “How come every hacker can get my health information, but my doctor can’t?” No doubt there are privacy and security concerns related with EHR data sharing, but they can all be solved. Healthcare interoperability is not being impeded by the need for privacy and security.

I’d suggest that the debate on healthcare interoperability is over. We know it’s the right thing to do. The only question is which organization is going to embrace it first and make it a reality. Format, standard, protocols, etc will matter little once we have organizations that have the will to share data.

Let’s stop debating healthcare interoperability and let’s start sharing.

Healthcare IT Cartoons – Fun Friday

Posted on June 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve had a lot of people say that they love when we do Fun Friday. The work we do in healthcare is serious, but we can’t take ourselves too seriously. This cartoon really made me laugh and highlighted how impacted our lives and likely our health are by this notification world we live in. I think we’re all familiar with that addiction. Ironically, that’s why I turn off all notifications on my phone unless I’m waiting for a specific call.

This one seems timely given all the health reform news. Some might consider it controversial, but I’ve never shied away from controversy. This topic is complicated, but those of us in healthcare can appreciate this “medical condition.”

Cost of a Breach, Proper Medical Record Disposal, and Delayed Breach Notifications

Posted on June 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for a quick roundup of HIPAA related tweets from around the Twittersphere. Check out these tweets and we’ll add in a bit of our commentary.


Matt’s correct that it’s not all avoidable, but at $380 per record that’s expensive. Breaches are expensive everywhere, but especially in healthcare. When you look at how insecure various industries are, my guess is that healthcare would be near the top of the list as well. That’s a problem.


I’m with Danika Brinda as well. I have no idea why this is still happening. Are people really that uneducated and naive when it comes to disposal of paper medical records? Hire a company with a great reputation if you’re not sure how to do it properly yourself.


Happens all the time. The fine for the delay is more than the damage of the breach itself. There should be no reason organization’s delay in their efforts to notify patients of a breach. Doing so can be a very expensive prospect. Plus, it’s the right thing to do for the patients.

Compromise Assessments & Penetration Testing in Healthcare

Posted on June 21, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Steven Marco, CISA, ITIL, HP SA and President of HIPAA One®.
Steven Marco - HIPAA expert
As healthcare providers continue to embrace technology, are patients being left vulnerable? If a recent incident involving patient portals is any indication, then the answer is a resounding “yes.”

True Health Diagnostics, a Frisco, TX-based healthcare services company recently became aware of a security flaw in their patient portal after an IT consultant logged in to view their test results and accessed other patient’s records by accident.  Upon investigating the issue it was determined that because True Health uses sequential numbers on their patient record PDF files, users of the patient portal could easily alter a digit in the URL and therefore view the medical information of other patients (also known as Forceful Browsing).

This recent event should serve as both a reminder and a warning to healthcare organizations using patient portals that in order to prevent a similar disclosure, implementing (and testing!) safeguards is necessary. There are two different actions an organization can take to either understand the scope of a breach and/or assess their level of security to prevent a disclosure.

Compromise Assessment: Due-Diligence Task

A compromise assessment is a due-diligence task used to verify that an organization hasn’t experienced a security breach. Essentially, it answers the question: “Have we been breached?”

Completed by a group of whitehat hackers or IS professionals, the goal is to access an organization’s various systems and verify if/when they were comprised and estimate the damage/exposure that has/could be done on their customer’s data. By gaining an understanding of the extent of the breach, the organization can in turn create a plan to remedy the issue and notify the appropriate parties of the disclosure.

Penetration Testing: Proactive Approach

In simple terms, conducting a penetration test is a proactive approach to finding any security deficiencies before a breach occurs or hackers find a way in. A penetration test answers to the question “How secure are we?”

By performing an authorized simulated attack, organizations can gain a much greater understanding of their security infrastructure. Although penetration testing alone will not ensure a network is compliant or secure, it will identify gaps between the existence threats and controls that an organization has in place.

Penetration testing has many other benefits, including:

  • Revealing where procedures may be failing – Especially if insecure services are being used for administration or if critical security patches are missing due to inadequate configuration and change management processes/procedures.
  • Exposing poor password policy – Including the use of default or weak passwords, password reuse and use of incremental passwords.
  • Justification to management – For approval of additional security technologies. For example: Showing upper management that penetration testers were able to hack into the system and email the entire customer database.
  • Acts as a “second set of eyes” – Critical if using an independent provider when hosting ePHI/PII.

Interested in more details on penetration testing? Check out HIPAA One’s penetration testing blog post.

About Steven Marco
Steven Marco is the President of HIPAA One®, leading provider of HIPAA Risk Assessment software for practices of all sizes.  HIPAA One is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA and the effort to make HIPAA compliance more accessible for all practices.  Are you HIPAA Compliant?  Take HIPAA One’s 5 minute HIPAA security and compliance quiz to see if your organization is risk or learn more at HIPAAOne.com.

Clinical Intelligence – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/23 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth) on the topic of “Clinical Intelligence.”

The word “Intelligence” is on the move in organizations. Creeping out from a corner of business that was once reserved for planning, strategy and competitive analysis- the intelligence of today is found in departments and teams and increasingly in the software suites that assist people with work. In hospitals and healthcare, clinical intelligence has deeper meaning than just “what AI programs are on the horizon and which one might we use.” Clinical Intelligence is dynamic, requiring multiple decisions and multiple steps to drive the sweeping change needed to usher in a new era of work and patient care. Healthcare will face challenges with next generation tech. However, with the right teams, forward thinking, and change agents, professionals can acquire meaningful Clinical Intelligence to transform their organizations and the patients they serve.

Let’s look at what defines Clinical Intelligence in order to break it down. An article from HIMSS describes Clinical Intelligence as:

“Clinical & Business Intelligence (C&BI) is the use and analysis of data captured in the healthcare setting to directly inform decision-making. It has the power to positively impact patient care delivery, health outcomes and business operations.” –Source

Clearly, Clinical Intelligence is in every level of a healthcare organization. That’s important, because for Clinical Intelligence to impact all areas, it has to be intentionally networked into each department. Clinical Intelligence thrives with interoperability, data, and analytics converging to help organizations make informed decisions from patient care to financial assessments. Teams need to evaluate their current capabilities, plan, and employ leaders with strong communication skills to convey the vision and objectives. This begins with a snapshot of where an organization falls on the data analytics spectrum. Descriptive, Predictive and Prescriptive Analytics make up the spectrum. Descriptive analytics tell a team about what has already happened from data collected around clinical documentation, claims, surveys, and lab tests. Predictive analytics takes the Descriptive data to make conclusions about future events. Lastly, Prescriptive analytics goes beyond prediction to reveal what steps to take should a prediction materialize. Moving through the data spectrum is an objective healthcare organizations will need to tackle to achieve CI.

In order to apply analysis to data sets, teams need to make sure the data that they have is relevant and large in scope to help guide their decision making. Additionally, professionals need to ask questions about data sets including, the type of data needed, the sample size, the available data, the bias that could be baked in, and if there are other sources of comparable data. The availability of public data is widely growing with resources including the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Furthermore, the world of machine learning is assisting like never before, offering help by allowing teams to skip over data prep to pre-packaged data sets collected from a variety of sources. IBM Watson and IPsoft Amelia are just two examples of artificial intelligence machine learning making huge advances in several industries.

The data hospitals and others amass through their collective workings, build upon strategies organizations can deploy to reduce costs, improve care, assist with safety and patient outcomes. Suddenly, using data becomes an advantage, a competitive resource edging a health entity over their peers. The pursuit of Clinical Intelligence results in cross departmental learning and knowledge not previously available. Examples of Clinical Intelligence are found in a variety of healthcare settings. Wake Forest Baptist Health in North Carolina used analytics to assist in their oncology infusion center to assist with patient flow. The results were felt across the center with nurses less rushed and the pharmacy processing requests faster. Patients had fewer delays and overall the work environment improved. Montefiore Health System uses a predictive analytics tool to help identify patients at high risk of death or intubation within 48 hours of admittance. Mayo Clinic has additional tools to catch sepsis and treat it faster. These examples are just some of the ways in which analytics become valuable transformational assets.

The time to begin moving towards organizational Clinical Intelligence is presently with the preparation of data collection. Machine learning, and analytics offer health systems a new frontier of discovery; benefitting the decision making of every person involved in patient care.

Resources and Other Clinical Intelligence Reading:

  1. Clinical and Business Intelligence
  2. Turning Healthcare Big Data into Actionable Clinical Intelligence
  3. Four Keys to Successful Digital Transformations in Healthcare
  4. Better Questions to Ask Your Data Scientists
  5. The Most Valuable Resource is No Longer Oil, but Data
  6. Does Your Company Know What to Do with All its Data?

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat focused on Clinical Intelligence. We’ll use the following 6 questions as the framework for the discussion:

This Week’s Topics
T1: What are some benefits and obstacles to Clinical Intelligence? #HITsm

T2: How can health organizations best prepare for machine learning & AI? #HITsm

T3: Data has been described as “digital oil”. What’s its value and worth to a healthcare org? #HITsm

T4: How can leaders convince skeptics that Clinical Intelligence is valuable to an organization & patients? #HITsm

T5: How long do you estimate it will take for Clinical Intelligence to be within a healthcare system? Why? #HITsm

Bonus: Do you have an example of healthcare using analytics to learn? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/30 – EHR Optimization
Hosted by Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell) and Julie Champagne (@JulieEChampagne)

7/7 – International EHR Adoption: Challenges and Solutions
Hosted by Stefan Buttigieg, MD (@stefanbuttigieg)

7/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

7/21 – Meeting the Patient Where They Are
Hosted by Melody Smith Jones (@MelSmithJones)

7/28 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

8/4 – TBD
Hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Jabba the Hutt EHRs Are Alive And Well

Posted on June 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you follow @ehrandhit on Twitter, then you might have noticed that we’ve set it up to tweet out links to articles from Healthcare Scene’s database of 11,000+ blog posts. Sometimes I see these tweets and I remember amazing posts like the one I saw today about Jabba the Hutt EMR.

Here’s the concept of the Jabba the Hutt EMR as I described it back in 2011:

Many long time readers of EMR and HIPAA will know I like to call big, bulky, old EMR software systems, Jabba the Hutt EMR. I think comparing these old legacy EMR software to Jabba the Hutt is a great comparison. For those that don’t know Star Wars that well (and I’m no expert), Jabba the Hutt was a very powerful figure. Although, over time he’d grown so big that he wasn’t very nimble (to say the least). So, despite his power and prestige, there was little to admire about him.

Does that sound a bit like some legacy EMR software? They’re big and powerful figures in the industry. However, their software has grown to the point that it’s clunky and not very nimble. Getting something changed on it is difficult and it’s built on a platform that makes it hard to add new features. Thus, they are Jabba the Hutt EMR.

I love that I had “long time readers” in 2011, but I digress. Does this still sound like a lot of the EHR vendors out there? The cynic might suggest it’s every EHR vendor. Good thing I’m not cynical.

In that post I went on to list things that might be characteristics you could look for to identify the Jabba the Hutt EMR software. It has some good ones, but I think it’s time to update the list. Here’s an updated list that you might find beneficial (and a little entertaining).

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
you’re part of every interoperability organization, but not actually interoperable.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
it costs as much for consultants to implement your software as your software.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
you hard coded 16 RXNorm codes to pass certification.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
you EHR certification is your EHR innovation plan.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
your programmers have never spent time in a clinic or hospital observing users.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
you’re afraid to talk to the media.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
your patient portal is your patient engagement strategy.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
HL7 and FHIR are your API strategy.

You might be a Jabba the Hutt EHR if…
you put AI and machine learning in a press release after implementing basic slicing and dicing analytics.

As I said in 2011, the more of these your EHR has, the more likely they’re a Jabba the Hutt EHR. I’m sure many of you could add to the list. Please do so in the comments.