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Is Healthcare Overhead Holding Back New #DigitalHealth Solutions?

Posted on May 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Earlier this year I wrote an article that questioned whether the Fitbit was really a digital health solution. I essentially came to the conclusion that Fitbit’s health data wasn’t clinically relevant and so that’s why we didn’t see it really impacting healthcare as we know it.

While Fitbit’s data may not be clinically relevant, Fitbit has still gone on to be an extremely successful wearable technology solution for consumers. For some reason we enjoy tracking our steps whether it really improves our health or not. Of course, maybe they’re also riding our own misconception that tracking steps improves health. Regardless, they’ve been extremely successful and haven’t had to prove that they actually do anything to move the needle in healthcare.

I wonder if this is the model that we’ll see happen most with digital health solutions. Instead of trying to actually take part in the ruthless, brutal, and complex healthcare infrastructure, I expect we’ll see most digital health solutions work on the outside.

Think about the overhead that comes with becoming FDA cleared or the overhead that comes with proving to a hospital that your solution really does improve patients’ health. That’s a lot of work compared with just creating the illusion of health and selling it directly to consumers. Maybe the illusion will play out as reality or maybe it will not. From a company’s point of view, all you have to do is keep the illusion in play and you can be successful.

No doubt this later strategy appeals to the startup culture that’s been created in the US. There’s so little that’s “lean startup” of MVP (minimum viable product) in healthcare. Most people in healthcare are afraid of anything that’s not mature. Healthcare regulations certainly discriminate against experimentation and show bias to mature technologies.

The only case that really can be made to entrepreneurs who want to pursue the harder path of proving their technologies is that once they’ve proved it they have a great defense against competitors who haven’t gone to that effort. That’s a powerful incentive, but not one that most will appreciated when starting a digital health startup company.

My gut tells me that the complexities of healthcare are holding many innovations from happening in healthcare. That’s unfortunate.

Can Using Simple Metrics Help Drive Long-Term EHR Adoption? – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lauren Brown, Adoption Specialist at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Lauren Brown - Healthcare IT Expert
Gaining clinical, financial, and operational value from Electronic Health Record (EHR) applications has become a top priority for most health organizations across the country. Gone are the days of simply focusing on implementation that, in many cases, led to dissatisfaction and low adoption rates by staff. Previously, dissatisfied customers began looking to switch applications in hopes of gaining better results. However, studies show that switching EHRs does not solve the dissatisfaction problem. In fact, only a reported 43% of physicians are glad they made the switch to a new application, and 49% reported lower productivity as a result of the switch.

Recently, there has been a shift towards optimizing these new technologies and focusing on how to get the most out of their chosen application. It is essential for organizations to establish an optimization plan in order to achieve long-term, measurable results. Utilizing a metric-driven optimization approach gives healthcare organizations the opportunity to maximize their EHR investment and uncover opportunities for adjustments that substantially bolster technology integration.

Metric-driven optimization analyzes performance data and uses this information to drive continuous performance improvement throughout the organization. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests focusing metrics on how the system performs, how it will affect the organization, and how users experience the system. The ultimate goal is to execute well-designed strategies to help organizations identify and reduce workflow inconsistency, maximize application performance, and improve patient care.

So what are the keys to a metric-driven optimization approach?

Incorporate metrics early

Initial training serves well in focusing on application basics. But adoption occurs at a varying pace, so it’s important to continually monitor training and create a plan for late adopters. During training, staff will likely remember only a small portion of the information they are taught; if optimization occurs too late in the process, users do not learn best-practice workflow. This can result in workaround habits that become difficult to change. The use of metrics early in the process will help to monitor EHR adoption and focus on areas of opportunity. Metrics allow you to identify individuals who are struggling with their education and intervene.

Utilize system data found through metrics

Often, healthcare organizations try to mimic processes and workflows from past applications or paper records. This method can get you through the initial implementation, but it is not sustainable for long-term adoption. Before implementation begins, it’s important to analyze and document best practice procedures. In order to get the most out of the system once it’s in place, you’ll want to examine staff performance and analyze key workflows. The insights you gain will help ensure that productivity and stability continue to increase over time.

Capturing the right data allows you to identify inconsistencies and application issues that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. Developing and reporting metrics shows the value of optimization efforts and helps support staff moving forward. Existing workflow issues, if not addressed, will become more visible with technology. Utilize the technology to eliminate redundant, time-consuming processes. Look at your EHR as the leverage you need to create change to promote consistency and transformation across the organization.

Metric-driven optimization is an ongoing process

The need for optimization is an ongoing effort – not a one-time event. Incorporating metrics into the long-term roadmap as a continuous project will allow you to respond to changes in a timely fashion. Comprehensive metrics regarding how end users will be able to reach proficiency in the EHR application is an important element in ensuring adoption success. The more metrics are shared the more value an organization can gain from optimization efforts. Changes, including system upgrades and new employees, can continue to challenge optimization efforts that were previously made. They often require both functional and cultural changes in processes that impact many different groups across an organization. Data regarding these changes are key to ensuring those who will be impacted are aware and have the ability to adopt for the life of the application.

By taking a metric-driven optimization approach, healthcare organizations improve their use of technology and achieve long-term adoption. Instead of simply installing an EHR, the application is leveraged to enhance performance and push organizations to exceed expectations with patient care.

How has the use of metrics improved your organization’s technology adoption?

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training.