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You Might Have a Culture of Healthcare IT Security if…

Posted on April 6, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve often written that the key to really ensuring the security and privacy of data in healthcare, we need healthcare organizations to build a culture of security and privacy. It’s not just going to happen with a short term sprint.

So, I thought I’d have some fun and turn it into a list of ways for you to know if your organization has an organization of healthcare IT security or not.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…your chief security officer has power to influence change.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent time doing risk mitigation after your HIPAA risk assessment.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve found breaches in your system (Note that you found them as opposed to them finding you).

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve turned down a company because of their inability to show you security best practices.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent as much time on people as technology.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…someone other than your chief security officer or HIPAA committee has brought a security issue to your attention.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent a sleepless night worrying about security at your organization.

I’m sure I’m missing some obvious things. Please add to the list in the comments.

Are We More Honest with Our Phones Than with Our Doctors?

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This is such a great question, but like most great questions requires more than a Yes or No answer and usually leads to a depends response. If you’re asking for my short answer though, I’d say that usually yes.

Certainly there are some exceptions. There are certain people that won’t share anything on the internet and that includes their phone. So, of course they’re not going to be more honest with their phone than they are their doctor. However, social media proves that the majority of people don’t mind sharing. In fact, when you look at what people are willing to share publicly, you have to wonder what they’re sharing online privately.

From a health perspective, this can be a huge benefit as you try to track someone’s health. In the article linked above they talk about how a smart phone app was a much better way to get data from teenagers participating in their research. They described the paper surveys as homework and the mobile app as fun. No doubt that resonates with anyone that has spent time with teens.

However, that really only addresses the accessibility and ease of providing the data. There’s a disconnect from reality that happens on the phone which allows us to be more comfortable sharing some things that we wouldn’t likely share face to face with the doctor. In healthcare, we’re usually battling against this issue as we talk about Telemedicine and how it’s not the same as an in person office visit. They’re right. Telemedicine isn’t the same as an in office visit. In some ways it feels less threatening and people are more willing to share. While this “disconnect” can be a down side, it can also be used as an upside.

Like most things in life, there are pros and cons. The key as we approach digital health solutions is to understand the benefits and challenges and make the most of what’s possible.