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Most Popular Healthcare IT Articles of 2015

Posted on December 31, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we come to the end of 2015, I thought I’d take a minute and look back at our top 16 most read Healthcare IT articles in 2015.

6 Healthcare Incubators Growing the Future of HealthTech – Great article. No doubt there are more great healthcare incubators starting all the time. Looks like maybe we should go back and do an update.

Healthcare IT and EHR Conferences and Events – If you’re looking for healthcare IT related conferences and events, this page is a great resource. Along with showing our schedule of conferences and events, we also highlight some of the most popular healthcare IT conferences.

Crazy and Funny ICD-10 Codes – People love a good laugh. Amazing that this post in 2011 was still making people laugh in 2015. It would be interesting to see how many times these funny codes have been used since ICD-10 started on Oct 1, 2015.

Benefits of EMR or EHR Over Paper Charts – I love when people just complain about their EHR software. It’s amazing how quick we forget the benefits of EHR and start to take them for granted.

The 2015 #HIT99 Results Are In – I love this list of people. If you’re looking for an amazing group of healthcare IT people to follow, start with this list.

2014 EHR Mandate – I’m really glad that so many years later this post is still getting traffic. I’m still annoyed by people that say that EHR was mandated. This post outlines why it’s not mandated, but why you should consider EHR anyway (Note: Government money isn’t one of the main reasons)

Mark Cuban’s Suggestion to Do Regular Blood Tests – I was amazed at the brouhaha that Mark’s comments created. This post was my take on it. I side with Mark, but most people I read did not. This topic is going to become more and more important as more tests and sensors enter the market.

Best Scanners for High Volume Scanning in a Doctor’s Office – I need to update this post with the latest version of the various scanners out there. I’ll have to reach out to Fujistu, Ambir, and Canon to get updates on the latest scanners.

HIPAA Security and Compliance Thoughts from the Healthcare Cyber Security Summit – This is a great guest post by Anna Drachenberg. I always love when smart people take time to share their insights on this blog.

Practice Fusion Violates Some Physicians’ Trust in Sending Millions of Emails to Their Patients – This is still the article that took me the longest to write. In fact, it probably took me 10 times as long as any other article I’ve written. I’m glad that people are still reading it. It’s a story that every EHR vendor should learn about so they can avoid the same thing happening to them.

Digital Signatures in EMR – Signatures are still the biggest source of blame for paper in health care. Well, that doesn’t count printing from EHR software. I’m glad that we now have a number of great digital signature options. Much has changed since this post back in 2007.

EMR Companies Holding Practice Data for “Ransom” – I wish I could say that this isn’t a problem anymore. Unfortunately, I’m sure we’re going to see even more of it as organizations choose to switch EHR.

HIPAA Compliance and Windows Server 2003 – I wonder how many healthcare organizations still have Windows Server 2003 in production. I’m guessing far too much.

Examples of HIPAA Privacy Violations – More HIPAA Lawsuits Coming? In 2006 we knew that more HIPAA violations were coming, but I don’t think then we even dreamed of the size of the breaches that would occur. I think more HIPAA Lawsuits are still coming.

Firewall & Windows XP HIPAA Penalties – Same story with Windows XP as Windows Server 2003. You’re a brave soul to still run Windows XP in a healthcare organization.

The Next Major Healthcare Product – Care Management System – I still reference this article a lot when talking with people about trends in healthcare IT. I got my first PR pitch about a Care Management System. We’ll see if the term catches on. Regardless of whether the term catches on or not, the concept of a patient centered care management system is the next stage of what we need to provide care to patients.

Not a bad list. Looks like a few of the posts need updating. Something to look forward to in 2016. Happy New Year!

Measuring Patient Discomfort Using Brainwave Activity

Posted on December 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Digital health opportunities are popping up everywhere and in every part of the nation. The IoT Journal (Internet of Things) recently profiled a hospital down the street from me who is exploring IoT’s potential to bring drug free relief to patients. Here’s a short excerpt from the article:

Until recently, when health-care providers wanted to gauge the level of discomfort a patient was enduring, they typically had to ask that individual to rate his or her pain—for example, on a scale of 1 to 10—and then use that information to plan treatment accordingly. If they wanted to ease the patient’s pain, they needed to administer medication.

Several months ago AccendoWave released an alternative solution that does not require medication and is personalized to each patient. The system was released in June 2015, says Martha Lawrence, AccendoWave’s founder and CEO, and has since been tested at several facilities. The company has spent seven years researching its solution for assessing patient discomfort levels, and is now using a headband that measures electroencephalography (EEG) activity and prompts a tablet PC to provide content aimed at reducing that discomfort.

The AccendoWave headband, which has seven EEG sensor leads built into it, transmits its brain-wave measurements to the tablet via a Bluetooth connection. The tablet, a Samsung Tab 4, uses its built-in AccendoWave software to process patient brain-wave data and then display diversionary content, including games, music, video clips and full-length movies. If, as a patient views a specific piece of content, the brain waves change to indicate increasing comfort, that content remains on the screen. If the content does not appear to have a positive effect on the brain waves, the software continues to select other content until it displays something appealing to the patient.

Pretty interesting approach. The article does note that they don’t use the brainwave data to determine how much medication to administer. They just use it as a way to assess the system’s effectiveness. They also do patient surveys to assess the impact of the device on a patient’s comfort. The article says that since the hospital implemented the system in the hospital, “1,600 patients have used the device to date, and more than 450 have completed surveys…More than 90 percent of responders reported viewing the system in a positive light.”

I’ve seen these EEG sensors for a while and they’re pretty neat. However, I always wondered how they’d actually be implemented and how they could be used to benefit patient care. No doubt it’s still early in their efforts to use and assess brainwaves, but it’s a pretty interesting solution to tie brain wave activity to soothing images. I’ll be watching to see how this evolves.

Digital Therapies for Healthcare

Posted on December 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently talking to Paulo Machado about what digital health was happening at the CES conference in Las Vegas (see my full schedule of Health Care IT Conferences and Events). Over the 10 years I’ve been going to the event, digital health has really grown at CES. Plus, it has its own subsection called the Digital Health Summit. I’ll actually be speaking at CES as part of a panel on genomics called “Look Who’s Talking: Newborn Genomic Data Enables Precision Medicine” which is happening January 7th, 2:15 PM – 2:40 PM if you’d like to attend.

As I was talking about digital health at CES, I learned that Paulo is now CEO of an evidence based digital therapy company. I’ve long loved the concept of evidence based digital therapies and I was glad to see someone like Paulo working on them. For those not familiar with digital therapies, here’s a look at the top 3 companies in the space:

Claritas Mindsciences
Claritas MindsSciences designs evidence based digital therapies that empower people to manage their cravings and addictions. Dr. Judson Brewer founded the company when he was leading Yale’s Therapeutic Neuroscience Clinic. Our digital solutions deliver evidence-based mindfulness training in a personalized, cost effective & scalable fashion. Our first product, Craving to Quit is a 21 session smoking cessation program based on an NIH funded randomized controlled clinical trials which showed that our approach was twice as effective as gold standard treatment at the end of therapy and was >5x as effective at week 17 with a quit rate of 31%. Healthy Eating and Opioid/Drug addiction solutions will be launched in 2016.

Omada Health
Omada works with employer and health plan customers to provide scalable, effective, and evidence-based behavioral interventions for those at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. Combining proven behavioral science and the clinically-meaningful results for a tipping point population – those most at-risk for developing obesity-related chronic diseases. Omada operates on a pay-for-outcomes pricing model that eliminates risk for enterprise customers, and is helping drive the company’s growth in the marketplace.

WellDoc
WellDoc is a digital health technology company that develops mobile solutions to drive behavioral and clinical change in chronic disease. WellDoc’s goal is to improve patient self-management and help physicians overcome gaps in the delivery system to improve clinical outcomes and decrease cost. WellDoc has commercialized the first mobile prescription therapy, BlueStar®, for adults with type 2 diabetes. Mobile prescription therapy fills the support gap between patients and providers during the 8700 hours that individuals are living their lives outside the healthcare system. WellDoc has a proven track record of contributing published, peer-reviewed clinical evidence since 2008 and in June 2015 presented real-world patient engagement and clinical outcomes at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) 75th Scientific Session. BlueStar is recognized by the ADA on its website as the first and only in the new class of diabetes treatment known as Mobile Prescription Therapy.

I’m sure there are other companies that are working on digital therapies. Please share them in the comments. It’s time we spend a lot more time learning about these companies since companies like these are going to transform health care as we know it.

Are These Types of Breaches Really Necessary?

Posted on December 28, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the past couple of days, I took the time to look over Verizon’s 2015 Protected Health Information Data Breach Report.  (You can get it here, though you’ll have to register.)

While it contained many interesting data points and observation — including that 90% percent of the industries researchers studied had seen a personal health information breach this year — the stat that stood out for me was the following. Apparently, almost half (45.5%) of PHI breaches were due to the lost or theft of assets. Meanwhile, issue of privileges and miscellaneous errors came in at distant second and third, at just over 20% of breaches each.

In case you’re the type who likes all the boxes checked, the rest of the PHI breach-causing list, dubbed the “Nefarious Nine,” include “everything else” at 6.7%, point of sale (3.8%), web applications (1.9%), crimeware, (1.4%), cyber-espionage (0.3%), payment card skimmers (0.1%) and denial of service at a big fat zero percent.

According to the report’s authors, lost and stolen assets have been among the most common vectors for PHI exposure for several years. This is particularly troubling given that one of the common categories of breach — theft of a laptop — involves data which was not encrypted.

If stolen or lost assets continue to be a problem year after year, why haven’t companies done more to address this problem?

In the case of firms outside of the healthcare business, it’s less of a surprise, as there are fewer regulations mandating that they protect PHI. While they may have, say, employee worker’s compensation data on a laptop, that isn’t the core of what they do, so their security strategy probably doesn’t focus on safeguarding such data.

But when it comes to healthcare organizations — especially providers — the lack of data encryption is far more puzzling.

As the report’s authors point out, it’s true that encrypting data can be risky in some situations; after all, no one wants to be fumbling with passwords, codes or biometrics if a patient’s health is at risk.

That being said, my best guess is that if a patient is in serious trouble, clinicians will be attending to patients within a hospital. And in that setting, they’re likely to use a connected hospital computer, not a pesky, easily-stealable laptop, tablet or phone. And even if life-saving data is stored on a portable device, why not encrypt at least some of it?

If HIPAA fears and good old common sense aren’t good enough reasons to encrypt that portable PHI, what about the cost of breaches?  According to one estimate, data breaches cost the healthcare industry $6 billion per year, and breaches cost the average healthcare organization $3.5 million per year.

Then there’s the hard-to-measure cost to a healthcare organization’s brand. Patients are becoming increasingly aware that their data might be vulnerable, and a publicly-announced breach might give them a good reason to seek care elsewhere.

Bottom line, it would be nice to see out industry take a disciplined approach to securing easily-stolen portable PHI. After years of being reminded that this is a serious issue, it’s about time to institute a crackdown.

Holiday Message

Posted on December 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

“The more you give away, the more you receive. You make a living by what you get, but you make a life by what you give.”-Thomas Monson

I thought this was the perfect message for me on Christmas day. I hope that you enjoy it as well. I asked some kids I know what they were planning to give for Christmas. They missed the nuance in the question and started telling me what they wanted. I was surprised how much effort it took them to answer my original question. Of course, as I’ve taken my kids to shop for Christmas, they kept giving me ideas and at least a dozen times I asked them, “Is that something for your mom or something for you?” Hopefully all of this will help my children learn the concept of giving so they make a wonderful life.

Merry Christmas

Healthcare Podcasts – Do You Listen?

Posted on December 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I’ve started regularly doing a series of Healthcare Scene interviews. I have to tell you that it’s a lot of fun to sit down with really smart people and have them share their knowledge with the Healthcare Scene community. At the start of 2016, I’m planning to turn those interviews into the Healthcare Scene podcast. Thanks to the ubiquity of smart phones which provide easy access to podcasts and easier options for playing your cell phone through your car speakers, I see many more people subscribing to podcasts than did in the past.

Leading the Healthcare podcasting world is a group of 4 podcasters that now actually do a combined show as well which they call the Healthcare Podcasters. I couldn’t find a specific landing page for the Healthcare Podcasters because I think all 4 of the podcasters rotate who hosts the combined show and because it’s so new. I’ve attended a few of them and it’s always interesting to see how they’re trying to use the platform. You can see their latest episode here.

Here are the 4 podcasters that take part:

It’s interesting to see the mix. You can pretty much find a podcast on any topic that interests you these days. Some other great healthcare podcasts I’ve seen vary from The Change of Shift nursing podcast by Sean Dent to The Awesome DPC Doctor Show! podcast which talks about direct primary care. Jared Johnson created a list of a number of other healthcare podcasts too.

What do you think of all of these podcasts? Do you listen? Do you have others that you listen to and enjoy (healthcare related or not)?

I’d always been kind of down on podcasts, but as it’s become easy to get them on our wirelessly connected mobile devices I’ve become more of a fan. Between time in the car and exercise (which many are doing), you can really listen to a whole lot of audio content.

Patient Driven Innovation vs Healthcare Driven Innovation

Posted on December 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I came across this interesting tweet and image from @joyclee:
Healthcare Innovation

I look forward to participating in a discussion around this graphic in the comments. Please be sure to chime in.

My main complaint with the graphic is that the level of healthcare driven innovation should be higher. I’m torn on if it’s higher or lower than patient driven innovation. Either way, I think it deserves to be higher.

I think that some people confuse making noise with true healthcare innovation. It’s one thing to make a bunch of noise. It’s another to really impact health care. I love grass roots efforts to “hack healthcare.” However, I’ve seen a lot of efforts that haven’t really made an impact.

Of course, I guess it’s worth discussing if an innovation needs to have impact to be considered an innovation. I look forward to reading your thoughts in the comments.

Figure 1 – The Quiet Medical Education and Collaboration Platform

Posted on December 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As a healthcare IT blogger, I try to keep up to date with the latest happenings in healthcare IT. Of course, it’s impossible to keep up with everything, but I’ve generally heard of tech companies that are getting traction in healthcare. Either someone tells me about it, I see it on social media, or the company reaches out to me directly to have me write about them. However, sometimes companies quietly do their work and don’t ever hit my radar while they’re gaining significant traction. That was the case with Figure 1 who I first saw on a venture capital blog I read regularly.

The venture capitalist described Figure 1 as instagram for doctors. I’d describe it as a medical education and collaboration platform. Both are pretty accurate depending on your goals. The former is better for raising money and the later is better for understanding what Figure 1 actually does.

No doubt what Figure 1 has built is impressive. They have over half a million healthcare professionals (I think they’re close to a million, but they seemed to be waiting to announce when they actually hit that amazing milestone) on their platform that are viewing images on their platform. Maybe more impressive is that over 50,000 healthcare professionals use Figure 1 on a daily basis and Figure 1’s “medical cases” have been viewed over 1 billion times. They have a very international audience with healthcare professionals from over 100 countries (They verify professionals in over 75 countries). That’s a really significant international medical community.

This is no surprise to me. The first EMR forum I was part of 10 years ago when I started this blog created a section of the forum where doctors posted various medical images. It was a really popular part of the site and doctors seemed to love it. So, it made total sense to me that a mobile optimized version of what was happening on that forum would be even more popular.

Just to put what Figure 1 is doing in perspective, here are some user stories that Figure 1 shared with me:

“I saw a patient who was immunocompromised and had ecthyma gangrenosum on Figure 1 recently, and then later I saw it in person on a child. I’ve never seen that kind of rash before in person, and I knew exactly what it was because I’d
seen it on Figure 1. I treated the patient for exactly what it was instead of something else.”

And now for an international take on what Figure 1 is doing:

Dr. Hugo Zuniga is a family physician working in the Peruvian rainforest in a rural farming community of about 2000 people. As the only physician in the area, Dr. Ziniga is forced to treat many injuries, illnesses, and infectious diseases. Specialists are only available to the community via larger hospitals outside the rainforest. These hospitals are far and require a planned ride to reach them. The cost of visiting these hospitals is typically more than members of the community can afford, so Dr. Ziniga often lends money to his patients for treatment.

Dr. Ziniga says that Figure 1 helps him treat his patients. As an example, he speaks of one particular case where he was able to aid a five-year-old patient with a recurring infection. The patient was sent to a large hospital outside the rainforest for surgery, but the doctors there sent him back untreated, saying he didn’t need surgery.

When the patient returned to the community, Dr. Ziniga felt the other doctors had made the wrong decision. Suspecting that the patient’s adenoids were causing the recurring infection, he posted a photo to Figure 1 asking others if they agreed. After receiving support from the international Figure 1 community, Dr. Ziniga sent the patient back to the hospital, where he was given the surgery he needed.

Dr. Ziniga has no ambulance and few medical supplies. But now, with Figure 1, he says he doesn’t feel as isolated anymore.

I’m really impressed by Figure 1’s approach. It’s largely being done outside of the medical establishment, but it’s generally complimentary to the medical establishment. It’s not easy getting 100 doctors on any platform. Half a million healthcare professionals is really impressive. I’d love to know what you think of what Figure 1 is doing.

Medical Device and Healthcare IT Security

Posted on December 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you haven’t noticed, we’ve been starting to do a whole series of Healthcare Scene interviews on a new video platform called Blab. We also archive those videos to the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel. It’s been exciting to talk with so many smart people. I’m hoping in 2016 to average 1 interview a week with the top leaders in healthcare IT. Yes, 52 interviews in a year. It’s ambitious, but exciting.

My most recent interview was with Tony Giandomenico, a security expert at Fortinet, where we talked about healthcare IT security and medical device security. In this interview we cover a lot of ground with Tony around healthcare IT security and medical device security. We had a really broad ranging conversation talking about the various breaches in healthcare, why people want healthcare data, the value of healthcare data, and also some practical recommendations for organizations that want to do better at privacy and security in their organization. Check out the full interview below:

After every interview we do, we hold a Q&A after party where we open up the floor to questions from the live audience. We even allow those watching live to hop on camera and ask questions and talk with our experts. This can be unpredictable, but can also be a lot of fun. In this after party we were lucky enough to have Tony’s colleague Aamir join us and extend the conversation. We also talked about the impact of a national patient identifier from a security and privacy perspective. Finally, we had a patient advocate join us and remind us all of the patient perspective when it comes to the loss of trust that happens when a healthcare organization doesn’t take privacy and security seriously. Enjoy the video below:

Designing Healthcare Around Technology, Not Buildings

Posted on December 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If I were designing our system from scratch I would design it around technology, not buildings.

Nothing like a quote from Bernard J. Tyson, Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente to get a new post started. Before I get the lynch mob of doctors coming after him for this quote, he also said something else right before suggesting healthcare should be designed around technology, not buildings:

That doesn’t mean more technology always means better care, it means we need to understand how technology can improve the care our wonderful nurses and physicians already provide.

At the end of 2015 as new regulations have largely calmed and most organization settle into the new EHR reality, let’s all take some time to think about how we can leverage that tech investment in a meaningful way (pun intended).

Unfortunately, the past half a dozen years technology has been a means to government incentive as opposed to a means of healthcare innovation. It’s time to stop the insanity and return to positivity when it comes to our discussion of the impact of technology on health care.

I was recently asked if I was passionate about health care and EMR or if I was more passionate about building a great blog network. My answer was simple. My core belief is that technology can have an impact for good on any industry. That’s what I’m most passionate about. I love to see technology transform something.

I’m sure that many would argue that technology has transformed health care. It just hasn’t transformed health care in good ways. I’d argue that regulations are what’s caused health care to transform in bad ways and technology is just the tool that can be used for good or bad.

It’s time we take back our IT in healthcare and make sure the transformation it provides is something great for patients and providers. When was the last time you thought about the transformative opportunity that technology provides? No doubt you have to deal with the operational challenges of today, but don’t forget to spend time thinking about where you want your technology to be tomorrow.

There are some examples. Take what Dr. Jimmie Vanagon is doing with his #ProjectedEHR. You’ve never met someone so excited about the way technology has enabled his practice and engaged his patients. We need more Jimmie Vanagon’s in healthcare showing us the right way to use technology for the benefit of patients and doctors and fewer regulations which strangle us.