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Restoring Humanity to Health Care – My Experience Part 2

Posted on February 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seemed appropriate for me to follow up with part 2 of my experience with a new wellness focused medical practice called Turntable Health, an operating partner of Iora Health. In case you missed part 1 of the journey, you can find it here.

Walking into the clinic, there was a different feel. It felt more like walking into a local coffee shop than going for a doctors appointment. The lobby was so inviting that I wondered if some in the community used it as a place to go and work on occasion. I spend a fair amount of time in the Downtown Las Vegas tech community, so it wasn’t a surprise that I actually knew a few of the people in the lobby. So, I was able to connect with some friends while I waited for my appointment.

The check in process was simple and I was invited back by my health coach. In this case the health coach acted very much like an MA or nurse in a regular medical office, but the feel was more friendly an casual. We both knew we had an hour together so there wasn’t the usual frenetic pace the accompanied a doctors office.

I had a couple paper forms to sign (yes, the signature is still often easier on paper), but no major health history to fill out or anything like that. They had a one question survey that I think was about my current state of wellness. Over the hour the health coach did ask many of the questions that would be on a normal health history form and key them into the Iora EHR system. It was a unique approach since it gave me the opportunity to talk about the things as we went through them and many of the things we talked about (ie. my family health history) came up later in my conversation with the doctor.

The exam room looked quite a bit like any other exam room you might visit. The colors and lighting were nice and they had little touches like this local art work display in the exam room (see picture below). It’s kind of interesting to think about a doctor’s office as a kind of local art gallery.

At one point in the conversation with my health coach, we talked a bit about fitness tracking and she quickly emailed me some fitness apps that she liked. Little did she know that I write about such apps and that industry for a living on Smart Phone Healthcare. It also illustrated how much of a need there is for someone to be a trusted content curator of the 30k+ mobile health apps out there. Especially if we want healthcare providers to make a dent in actual usage of these to improve our wellness.

After completing her assessment, my health coach left the room and came back with the doctor. When he came in he told me that my health coach had talked with him about me and my health (in a normal practice this amounts to “Fever in room 3”) and he wanted to talk to me about a few of the issues I was dealing with. When he did this, the doctor and my health coach came into the room and we all sat around a small table. It was almost as if I’d just sat down for hot chocolate (I don’t drink coffee) with my doctor and my health coach.

There were a few differences though. When my doctor sat down he plugged in a chord to display his computer screen (my record) on a big plasma monitor that we could all see. I’m not sure why my health coach didn’t do that too. I almost moved over next to her to watch her enter the data, but I felt like that was just my inner EHR nerd coming out. Plus, I didn’t want her to necessarily know my background in that regard and that I’d be writing about the experience later. I wanted to see what they usually did for patients.

Because we were all sitting around the proverbial exam room “coffee table” I didn’t feel rushed at all. We talked about a couple sports issues I’ve been dealing with and ways that I could make sure they don’t continue to get worse (since I’m definitely not stopping my sports playing). We also spent some time talking about how to work on some long term wellness tracking around high cholesterol and diabetes.

After the visit, I realize that in many ways it wasn’t any different than a regular doctor visit. I could have gone into any doctor’s office and discussed all of these things and likely gotten similar answers. I think part of this is Turntable Health still working on the evolution of how to really treat a patient from a Wellness perspective. However, while many aspects of the treatment were the same, the experience felt different.

The long appointment time. The health coach. The doctor that wasn’t rushed all contributed to a much different visit than you’d get in most doctors’ offices. You can be certain that had I gone to a doctor for my sports issues, we wouldn’t have talked about things like cholesterol and diabetes. There wouldn’t have been time. Was the care any better or worse? It’s the same care that would have been provided by other professionals, but the care was given room to breathe.

As I left the visit, a part of me did feel a little disappointed. You might wonder why after this glowing review of the unique experience. I think the disappointment came from some improperly placed expectations. I’m not sure I really thought deeply about it, but I wish I’d realized that they’re not going to solve your wellness in one visit.

When I think about my psyche as it relates to doctors, I’ve always approached a doctor as someone you go into and they fix you and then you go home. When applying that same psyche to a wellness based approach to medicine, it leads to inappropriate expectations. Wellness is a process that takes time to understand and address. In fact, it’s a process that’s likely never done. So I think that led to my gut reflex expectation of what I’d experience.

I think one way Turntable Health could help to solve these expectations is to do a better job on the first visit to describe the full model and plan for what they want to accomplish with a patient. Otherwise, you really just feel like you’re going in for another doctor’s appointment. I’m not sure if that’s a cool chart of all their services and how they help me improve my wellness or if it’s a list of ways that they’re working to help improve my wellness.

Basically, I wish they’d over communicated with me how Turntable Health was different and how they were going to deploy a suite of professionals and services to better help my overall wellness. It’s easy for those working at Turntable Health to forget that new patients haven’t seen their evolution and don’t know everything they’ve done to improve the primary care experience.

A few other things I’d have loved to seen. First, I filled out their 20 minute (I think it took me 10-15) survey before the appointment. I didn’t get any feeling that the health coach or the doctor had actually seen the results. In fact, the health coach asked me some of the same questions. Redundancy can be appropriate on occasion, but it could have made the visit more efficient if they already knew the answer to those questions and instead of getting the info they could have spent the time talking about the answers as opposed to getting the answers. Plus, I’m sure my answers would have triggered some other discussions. It all made me partially wonder why I filled out the survey in the first place. Were those just part of some research experiment or were they to help me improve my health?

I was quite interested in their portal and what it offered (obviously, since I’m a techguy). It seemed like the framework as opposed to a fully fleshed out solution. I could see where it could grow to something more powerful, but was disappointing on first login. In one area called measurements it had graphs of my Blood Pressure, Fasting Glucose, and Weight. Unfortunately, after one visit they only had one data point and now way for me to easily upload all my weight measurements from my iHealth scale. Hopefully integrations like that are coming since that data could definitely inform my wellness visits. I guess they need to work on the first time user experience for the portal. At least I can schedule appointments through it.

I imagine some of you are probably looking at this as a pretty major investment in my health. Some might even think an hour long appointment would be more time than they want to spend with the doctor. I get that and I don’t always want my appointment to be that long. In fact, now that I have my baseline, I hope that many visits become an email exchange or other electronic method that saves me going into the doctor at all. However, as I’m getting older, I see this as an important investment in my long term health. Hopefully this investment has a good ROI.

With that in mind, I’ll do what I can to keep you updated on my experience. Since I’m on a journey of wellness, I imagine this is Part 2 of Many. I hope you enjoyed the look into my experience.

Restoring Humanity to Health Care – My Experience Part 1

Posted on February 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In light of yesterday’s short story post, and also my post on EMR and EHR about concierge medicine, I thought it timely for me to document might entrance into what many are calling the next generation of healthcare. They talk about it as primary care that puts people first.

In my case, it’s my recent membership in Turntable Health, an operating partner of Iora Health. When I had to switch insurance plans this year, I decided to try out this new approach to primary care. The insurance plan I chose included a membership to Turntable Health. For those not familiar with Turntable Health, it was started by the infamous ZDoggMD and is backed by Tony Hsieh’s (CEO of Zappos) Downtown Project in Las Vegas.

To be honest, I’m not sure exactly what I’ve gotten myself into, but that was kind of the point. I can’t remember the last time I went to a primary care doctor. In fact, if someone asked me who my primary care doctor was I wouldn’t have an answer or I might mention one that my wife visited. I’m a relatively healthy person (luckily I have some good orthopedic friends for my sports injuries) and so I’ve never felt the desire to go in and see my doctor. I feel healthy, so why should I go and pay a doctor to tell me I’m healthy? I think this view is shared by many.

Will Turntable Health be able to change my view on this? Will they be able to take a true Wellness approach to things that will change how I view primary care? I’ve written for years about Treating a “Healthy” Patient, and so I’m interested to see if Turntable Health is making that a reality.

One thing is for sure. They’re taking a different approach than most doctors. I scheduled my first appointment for later today (Side Note: Not sure what it says that it took me 1-2 months to schedule my first appointment.). They slotted me in for an hour long appointment (a requirement for the first appointment) so that they can really get to know me and my wellness needs. Plus, they said I’d get a chance to get to meet my care team. A care team? What’s that? I’ll let you know after my appointment, but looking at their team I’d say it includes physicians together with health and wellness coaches.

The idea of a team of people thinking about my and my family’s wellness is intriguing. Although, I’ll admit that this wasn’t the biggest reason I chose to sign up with Turntable Health. It was part of the reason, but I was also excited by the idea of unlimited primary care. With unlimited primary care, it opens the door to things like text messages or eVisits with your doctor since they’re truly interested in your wellness and not churning another office visit to get paid.

With a family of 4 kids, there are dozens of times where my wife and I debate whether an office visit is needed. Every parent knows the debate. Am I just being paranoid or are they really sick? Is that rash something that needs to be treated right away or should I give it some time? Final answer: Let’s just take them in, because I don’t want it to be something bad and then I feel like I’m an awful parent because I chose not to take them in. I’m hopeful that with Turntable Health we can alleviate those fears since we don’t have to pay for the visit and we can start with an online visit which saves us time. That’s extremely compelling to me.

I can already say that my experience has been different. After scheduling my first appointment, I got the usual email confirming my appointment, offering directions to the office, and inviting me to fill out an “Online Health Assessment.” I thought it was cool that they were asking me to fill out those lengthy health history forms electronically before the visit. Turns out I was wrong. It was a survey style assessment of my health and wellness. They asked questions about my mental and physical health. They asked about my diet and exercise. They even asked about my quality of life. There weren’t any questions about my neck issue or the pain in my hand, let alone my allergies or past medical history. I wonder if they’ll do that when I get to the office. Plus, I’ll be interested to see what questions they ask me about that true wellness assessment.

Like I said, this appointment should be interesting. To be honest, I feel like I’m learning a new healthcare system. I know what’s appropriate and how the regular doctors office works. Here I’m not sure what’s right or wrong. Take for example the list of health and wellness classes Turntable Health offers with their membership. What other primary care office offers Tai Chi, Hot Hula and Meditation courses? I might even have to start doing yoga. Why not? It’s free. Although, what a different approach to Wellness.

There you go. There’s part 1 of my introduction into a new model for primary care. How will it go? We will see. How will they handle the fact that I’m a picky eater and that doesn’t jive well with many of their perspectives on Wellness? Will they really care about my wellness enough to reach out to me beyond appointments? How will my family and I react to this outreach? Will we stonewall them or will we embrace the increased interaction? It will be a fun journey and I hope you’ll enjoy me sharing it with you.

All in all, it does feel like they’re trying to restore humanity to healthcare. We’ll see how much we like humanity.

Update: Check out part 2.

“Please Choose One” – A Short Story

Posted on February 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Every once in a while I come across a piece of healthcare prose that I have to share, but there’s no good way to share it in pieces. I found that once in The Old Man and the Doctor Fable. It’s a must read if you haven’t read it.

I recently had another such example shared with me called “Please Choose One“. This one took me a second to really get into it, but about a quarter of the way through, I couldn’t stop reading and had to figure out how it ended. I’m sure that many physicians will feel the heartache shared in this short story. Thank you Philip Allen Green, MD for sharing. If you haven’t gone and read it, go read it…we’ll be back here once you’re done.

Obviously, the story is told in an exaggerated worst case scenario fashion. Although, to me that’s what illustrates the point so well. The lesson I took from the story is that we can’t take the human out of healthcare. Technology should help us offer more humanity to patients as opposed to less. Furthermore, we’re at risk for doing the opposite.

What’s your takeaway? I’d love to hear your thoughts on the story.

Hand of a Superhero – 3D Printing and Wearables

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This story has been going around all over social media, but it’s too good not to share. If you read the New York Times story and don’t get close to tears, I’ll be surprised. Prosthesis for children are such a great application of 3D printing. Plus, it’s great to see so many of the 3D printing designs out in the public domain and available to anyone for free.

Here’s a video look at how the prosthesis works:

Also, here’s a video where they literally build the 3D printed prosthesis.

The most amazing part of this prosthesis to me is the cable “tendons” that are attached to the wrist muscle to flex the hand. Seeing solutions like this help remind me that sometimes we’re trying to hard to find the perfect solution. Instead of trying to be the end all be all solution that restores everything to perfection, sometimes we need to approach the problem with a simple but effective solution.

The mix of new technologies applied in unique ways never cease to amaze me.

Thinking About Future EHR Switching When Purchasing EHR Software

Posted on February 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When we start purchasing our EHR, many times we don’t spend enough time thinking about what happens when we reach the end of life for the software we’re purchasing. I was particularly reminded of this when writing my post about the legacy EHR ticking time bombs. During our EHR or other healthcare IT software purchase, we don’t think about 5, 10, 15 years down the road when we might want to switch systems. What happens at the end of a system’s life is not our concern during an EHR purchase, but it should be.

A lot of people like to talk about EHR data portability. This is a very important subject when you’re looking to sunset an old system. However, if you haven’t put the right items in your EHR contract, it becomes a major issue for you to get that data out of the EHR. If you haven’t read the section on EHR contracts in my now somewhat dated EMR selection e-Book, take some time to read it over and check out your EHR contract.

When you can’t get the data out of your EHR, then you’re stuck in a situation that I described in my legacy EHR ticking time bomb post. You limp your legacy EHR system along and have issues with updates, fear the lost of the system completely, and much more. It’s just an ugly situation.

It’s nice to think that an EHR system will just work forever, but technology changes. It’s just the reality of life. I’m interested to see if the concept of an EHR vendor neutral archive will really take off. That would be one major way to combat this. However, I think many are afraid of this option because it’s tough to preserve the granular data elements in the EHR. Plus, it takes a forward thinking CIO to be able to make the investment in it. Although I’ve met some that are doing just this.

What has your organization done to prepare for the day that you’ll sunset your EHR or other healthcare IT systems? Is this a concern for you? Or are you like some CIOs who figure that it will be someone else’s problem?

What’s Your Value Based Care Strategy? What Role Does IT Play?

Posted on February 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I pretty regularly take a look at various healthcare IT whitepapers to glean insights into what’s happening in the industry and what advice vendors are offering healthcare organizations. I’ve been keeping a special eye on the changing reimbursement model and move to value based care and so I was interested in this whitepaper titled “How to Win with Value-based Care: Developing Your Practice’s EHR Strategy.”

The whitepaper starts with a dive into some of the changing care and reimbursement models that are emerging in healthcare. Then they offer this 4 step “Winning Strategy” for being ready for these changes:
Step 1: Assess your current situation
Step 2: Develop a customized VBC Plan that’s right for your practice
Step 3: Determine IT solution needs
Step 4: Implementation

In many ways, this 4 step plan could be applied to any project. Of course, the whitepaper dives into a lot more detail for each step. Although, I was struck by step 3. It takes for granted that value based reimbursement will require an IT solution. This whitepaper comes from a healthcare IT company with some value based IT product offerings so you have to question whether IT will be at the core of a practice’s value based care strategy or not.

As I think about the future of coordinated care and value based reimbursement, I think it’s more than fair to say that technology will be at the center of these initiatives. Value based care requires data to prove the quality of the care you’re providing. Certainly you could try and collect some of this data on paper, but does anyone think this is reasonable?

Try identifying all overweight patients in your patient population using paper chats. I can see in my mind’s eye an army of medical records professionals sifting through stacks of paper charts. It’s not a pretty solution and it’s fraught with error. That’s one query on an EHR system.

One of the biggest elements of value based reimbursement will be communication with patients. Can we build that real time communication on the back of snail mail? It sounds almost silly talking about it. Of course we’re going to use mobile devices, secure messages, and even secure video communication. We still have A LOT of work to do in this regard, but it’s the future.

Of course technology is going to be at the core of value based reimbursement. It’s the only way to accomplish what we’re striving to accomplish. The next question is: will the EHR make this possible or are we going to need something new and more advanced?

Are Legacy EHR Sytems the HIPAA Ticking Time Bomb?

Posted on February 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare IT and EHR security is a really important topic right now. Many organizations have started to spend time and resources on this problem after a series of healthcare and non-healthcare breaches. The Anthem breach being the most recent. Overall, this is a great thing for the industry since I think there’s more that could be done in every organization to shore up the privacy and security of patient health data.

In a recent conversation I had with Mike Semel, we talked about some of the challenges associated with legacy EHR and Healthcare IT systems in offices. Our conversation prompted to me to ask the question of whether these legacy EHR systems are the ticking time bombs of many healthcare organizations.

Think about what happens to many of these legacy EHR systems. They get put in some back office or under someone’s desk or in some nondescript closet where they’re largely forgotten. In many cases there are only 1-2 people who regularly use them and in many cases the word “regularly” equates to accessing it a few times a month. These few people are usually not technically savvy and know very little about IT security and privacy.

Do I need to ask the question about how good the security is on a system for which most people have forgotten?

These forgotten systems often don’t get any software updates to the application or the operating system. The former is an issue, but the later is a major problem. Remember that when updates to an operating system are issued, it’s essentially blasted out to the public that there are issues that a hacker can exploit. If you’re not updating the O/S, then these systems make for easy pickings for hackers.

Forget about great audit log tracking and other more advanced security on these legacy systems. In most cases, organizations are just trying to limp them along until they can decommission them and put them out to pasture. It makes for one massive security hole for most organizations.

Of course, this doesn’t even take into the account the fear that many organizations have that these systems will just give up the ghost and stop working all together. There’s nothing quite like security on a Windows 2000 Server box sitting under someone’s desk just waiting for it to die. Hopefully those hard drives and other mechanical elements don’t stop before the data’s end of life requirements.

These legacy systems aren’t pretty and likely present a massive HIPAA privacy and security hole in many organizations. If you don’t have a good handle on your legacy systems, now might be a good time to take a look. Better to do it now than to deal with it after a HIPAA breach or HIPAA audit.

Were Anthem, CHS Cyber Security Breaches Due to Negligence?

Posted on February 19, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Not long ago, health insurance giant Anthem suffered a security breach of historic proportions, one which exposed personal data on as many as 80 million current and former customers. While Anthem is taking steps to repair the public relations damage, it’s beginning to look like even its $100 million cyber security insurance policy is ludicrously inadequate to address what could be an $8B to $16B problem. (That’s assuming, as many cyber security pros do, that it costs $100 to $200 per customer exposed to restore normalcy.)

But the full extent of the healthcare industry hack may be even greater than that. As information begins to filter out about what happens, a Forbes report suggests that the cyber security intrusion at Anthem may be linked to another security breach — exposing 4.5 million records — that took place less than six months months ago at Community Health Systems:

Analysis of open source information on the cybercriminal infrastructure likely used to siphon 80 million Social Security numbers and other sensitive data from health insurance giant Anthem suggests the attackers may have first gained a foothold in April 2014, nine months before the company says it discovered the intrusion. Brian KrebsAnthem Breach May Have Started in April, 2014

Class action suits against CHS were filed last August, alleging negligence by the hospital giant. Anthem also faces class action suits alleging security negligence in Indiana, California, Alabama and Georgia. But the damage to both companies’ image has already been done, damage that can’t be repaired by even the most favorable legal outcome. (In fact, the longer these cases linger in court, the more time the public has to permanently brand the defendants as having been irresponsible.)

What makes these exploits particularly unfortunate is that they may have been quite preventable. Security experts say Anthem, along with CHS, may well have been hit by a well-known and frequently leveraged vulnerability in the OpenSSL cryptographic software library known as the Heartbleed Bug. A fix for Heartbleed, which was introduced in 2011, has been available since April of last year. Though outside experts haven’t drawn final conclusions, many have surmised that neither Anthem nor CHS made the necessary fix which would  have protected them against Heartbleed.

Both companies have released defensive statements contending that these security breaches were due to tremendously sophisticated attacks — something they’d have to do even if a third-grade script kiddie hacked their infrastructure. But the truth is, note security analysts, the attacks almost certainly succeeded because of a serious lack of internal controls.

By gaining admin credentials to the database there was nothing ‒ including encryption ‒ to stop the attack. The only thing that did stop it was a lucky administrator who happened to be paying attention at the right time. Ken Westin – Senior Security Analyst at Tripwire

As much these companies would like to convince us that the cyber security breaches weren’t really their fault — that they were victims of exotic hacker gods with otherworldly skills — the bottom line is that this doesn’t seem to be true.

If Anthem and CHS going to point fingers rather than stiffen up their cyber security protocols, I’d advise that they a) buy a lot more security breach insurance and b) hire a new PR firm.  What they’re doing obviously isn’t working.

5 Keys to Successful Digital Health Startups

Posted on February 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Venture Beat posted an interesting list of 5 keys to creating a successful digital health startup company:

1. Simplify providers’ workflow
2. Usher in the pay-for-performance era
3. Help doctors by empowering the entire care team
4. Don’t create lists; create actions
5. Build relationships between providers and patients

This list reminds me of something a venture capitalist once told me about the physician market. He said that there are only a couple things that doctors have ever paid for. Doctors pay for something that will drive more patients or make them more efficient. That’s reflected in some of the points above and is a good lithmus test for people looking to start a digital health company focused on doctors.

The EHR (Electronic Health Record) marketplace was a bit of an aberration in this regard. It originally started out with doctors purchasing an EHR in order to make them more efficient, but then the $36 billion of stimulus money through gas on a fire and it’s blown up in some people’s faces since they were focused too much on the government handout and not enough on the efficiency that the EHR would provide.

The EHR golden age is gone and we’re now returning back to a more rational market that wants to see some potential efficiency improvement or revenue increase before they buy. The above list highlights some of the places you may look to provide a doctor that efficiency.

Mobile Health to Transform Care: The Case for Adoption Now – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Todd Stansfield from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Todd Stansfield
Mobile health (mHealth) is here to stay, and you don’t have to look far for proof. Patients now use mHealth to comparison shop basic healthcare services and access test results. Providers use it to increase efficiencies and lower costs. And CIOs use it to get more out of an electronic health record (EHR) while juggling new security challenges from the bring your own device (BYOD) movement.

Perhaps one of mHealth’s greatest areas of impact is providers’ bottom line. A new study finds that baby boomers and millennials prefer providers who incorporate mobile technology into their practices. Seven percent of patients responded that they are willing to leave their current provider for one who offers remote care, a move that could have a significant financial impact on independent physician practices. This is especially clear when considering that an overall 20 percent of patients reported seeing the same doctor for less than 2 years and 14 percent reported not having a doctor. Additionally, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is now offering providers roughly $42 a month to manage care for Medicare patients with two or more chronic conditions in its Chronic Care Management program. These patients comprise two-thirds of Medicare beneficiaries. For practices with 20 eligible patients, that figure translates to over $10,000 per provider per year. Providers must use mHealth to meet some requirements of Chronic Care Management, such as offering 24-7 access to consultation, and companies are now creating technologies to help. Just last month, Qualcomm and Walgreens announced a joint venture to pair medical devices with mobile and web apps to provide remote patient monitoring and transitional care support.

And then there’s efficiency. Another study finds that “the average hospital loses $1.7 million per year due to inefficient care coordination,” according to a HealthIT Analytics article. Providers are finding mobile technology valuable for improving health information exchange and communication, areas underserved by current EHR systems. More providers are text messaging care information rather than communicating face-to-face with colleagues, resulting in more informed care teams and fewer avoidable healthcare errors. Providers are also using mobile devices to enhance real-time patient engagement rather than relying on cumbersome computers to document in the EHR. Often the result is improved patient care, shorter appointments, and more time to see more patients. And besides getting in and out of their provider’s office sooner, patients are also welcoming new efficiencies with real-time access to their medical records via smartphone, a selling point among younger generations pursuing an active role in their care. In a recent survey of Americans, millennials indicated a preference for patient portals that they can access via a smartphone or tablet.

Yet providers should plan carefully when implementing mHealth, as there are major costs for failing to set up robust infrastructures that support safe mobile use. Providers should perform security risk analysis to ensure the safety of protected health information (PHI). This includes evaluating the security of all mobile devices—tablets and smartphones—ensuring that each device stores, sends, and receives PHI securely using encryption and other methods. Providers must perform this analysis routinely to receive payments under Meaningful Use (MU) and to prevent the ever-growing number of data breaches. Data security has remained a chief concern for healthcare providers and leaders and has largely stifled the widespread adoption of mHealth. This may change as the Department of Health & Human Services plans to offer more guidance to mHealth developers and users for adhering to HIPAA rules, as it recently announced.

Providers must adopt mHealth to survive in today’s competitive marketplace. Not only will they reap the short-term benefits of higher revenues through Chronic Care Management and attracting new patients, but they will also build the secure infrastructure and tools needed for long-term success. mHealth will be critical to population health and health information exchange, two eventual destinations for the healthcare industry. Providers who adopt mHealth now will be ready for when our industry makes the complete shift toward a population-focused, value-based care model.

In my experience at The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, effective adoption begins when leaders engage their workforce in the vision and mission of the project; when education is focused, accessible, and targeted; when performance is measured, collected, and analyzed; and when adoption is sustained amid changing technologies and process improvements. For providers to make the transition successfully healthcare leaders must find and implement technologies that patients and providers want to use. They must provide education that is convenient, focused, and practical for providers, education that spans not only how to optimize the technology but also how to use it safely and in accordance with government regulations. Healthcare leaders must also track performance in quality and efficiency, and highlight areas for improvement. And lastly, they must ensure all efforts are sustained, reinforced, and tailored to changing needs.

mHealth is poised to transform healthcare. It’s no wonder that mHealth raised $1.2 billion in venture capital last year, or more than triple what it raised in 2013. I’d venture to say that a significant share of new patients, new revenues, and new efficiencies will be earned by providers who are going “mobile.”

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.