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How Secure Are Wearables?

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

JaneenB asks a really fantastic question in this tweet. Making sure that wearables are secure is going to be a really hot topic. Yesterday, I was talking with Mac McMillan from Cynergistek and he suggested that the FDA was ready to make medical device security a priority. I’ll be interested to see what the FDA does to try and regulate security in medical devices, but you can see why this is an important thing. Mac also commented that while it’s incredibly damaging for someone to hack a pacemaker like the one Vice President Cheney had (has?), the bigger threat is the 300 pumps that are installed in a hospital. If one of them can be hacked, they all can be hacked and the process for updating them is not simple.

Of course, Mac was talking about medical device security from more of an enterprise perspective. Now, let’s think about this across millions of wearable devices that are used by consumers. Plus, many of these consumer wearable devices don’t require FDA clearance and so the FDA won’t be able to impose more security restrictions on them.

I’m not really sure the answer to this problem of wearable security. Although, I think two steps in the right direction could be for health wearable companies to first build a culture of security into their company and their product. This will add a little bit of expense on the front end, but it will more than pay off on the back end when they avoid security issues which could literally leave the company in financial ruins. Second, we could use some organization to take on the effort of reporting on the security (or lack thereof) of these devices. I’m not sure if this is a consumer reports type organization or a media company. However, I think the idea of someone holding organizations accountable is important.

We’re definitely heading towards a world of many connected devices. I don’t think we have a clear picture of what this means from a security perspective.

Cerner Wellness Integrates with Apple’s HealthKit

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When Apple announced HealthKit, they announced a few healthcare partners including Epic. Many thought this was an interesting announcement, but I was (and still am) skeptical that anything really meaningful will come. As one person put it, we’re suppose to be excited that two of the most closed companies in the world are working together?

I recently saw the news come out that Epic’s main competitor, Cerner, announced that they’d integrated with Apple’s HealthKit. In fact, I believe their integration seems to have come out before Epic’s integration (unless I missed it, or maybe Epic just likes to keep quiet). Here’s a short excerpt from the Cerner announcement:

To me, HealthKit is about making it more convenient to manage your health and wellness, and share that information with the people that are helping you reach your goals. It’s less about trying to get real-time clinical insights or make new diagnoses. HealthyNow has the features that consumers and wellness experts are looking for in these apps, and by integrating with HealthKit, we’ve opened up the experience to a whole array of health apps for our members to choose from. This integration enables the feeding of key health metrics into our platform for sharing with health coaches, earning of incentive points, and identification of new opportunities to improve your health. By promoting healthier habits, consumers lower their premiums, health plans reduce their spend on treating avoidable diseases, and everyone lives a healthier life. (emphasis added)

The details on what Apple’s HealthKit would really do have been pretty foggy. Although, this paragraph illustrates where I figured HealthKit was going. Notice the part of the quote where I added emphasis. Cerner is just looking to suck data from HealthKit into Cerner. Maybe they have future plans to make Cerner data available to HealthKit, but the announcement seems to say they haven’t done so yet. This one way interface is exactly why I’m skeptical that HealthKit will really have a huge impact on healthcare.

What do you think? Have any of you integrated with HealthKit? I’d love to see if you have other views of where HealthKit might be headed.