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Is Healthcare Missing Out on 21st Century Technology?

Posted on July 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This tweet struck me as I consider some of the technologies at the core of healthcare. As a patient, many of the healthcare technologies in use are extremely disappointing. As an entrepreneur I’m excited by the possibilities that newer technologies can and will provide healthcare.

I understand the history of healthcare technology and so I understand much of why healthcare organizations are using some of the technologies they do. In many cases, there’s just too much embedded knowledge in the older technology. In other cases, many believe that the older technologies are “more reliable” and trusted than newer technologies. They argue that healthcare needs to have extremely reliable technologies. The reality of many of these old technologies is that they don’t stop someone from purchasing the software (yet?). So, why should these organizations change?

I’m excited to see how the next 5-10 years play out. I see an opportunity for a company to leverage newer technologies to disrupt some of the dominant companies we see today. I reminded of this post on my favorite VC blog. The reality is that software is a commodity and so it can be replaced by newer and better technology and displace the incumbent software.

I think we’ve seen this already. Think about MEDITECH’s dominance and how Epic is having its hey day now. It does feel like software displacement in healthcare is a little slower than other industries, but it still happens. I’m interested to see who replaces Epic on the top of the heap.

I do offer one word of caution. As Fred says in the blog post above, one way to create software lock in is to create a network of users that’s hard to replicate. Although, he also suggested that data could be another way to make your software defensible. I’d describe it as data lock-in and not just data. We see this happening all over the EHR industry. Many EHR vendors absolutely lock in the EHR data in a way that makes it really challenging to switch EHR software. If exchange of EHR data becomes wide spread, that’s a real business risk to these EHR software companies.

While it’s sometimes disappointing to look at the old technology that powers healthcare, it also presents a fantastic opportunity to improve our system. It is certainly not easy to sell a new piece of software to healthcare. In fact, you’ll likely see the next disruptive software come from someone with deep connections inside healthcare partnered with a progressive IT expert.

Focused EMR Discussion Boards

Posted on July 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I was speaking at the gMed user conference, I learned about many of the users who participated on a GI focused online forum for gMed users. Essentially it’s an independent user group for gMed EHR users. Although, with so many GI doctors in one place, you can be sure there are all sorts of focused discussions that would be of interest to gastroenterology doctors.

Of course, there are a lot of other online forums that are similar to the GI forum. For example, Amazing Charts has a really active user forum. The open source EHR, OpenEMR also has a forum. I’m sure there are a lot more. I’d love to hear about other EHR forums you know about in the comments.

Many people probably don’t know that I built up much of my EMR knowledge participating in the now defunct EMR Update. It was a fantastic way for me to learn and share my knowledge. I’m sure that those who participate in the various EMR forums above get the same benefit. Although, it’s probably even more valuable since the forums above are all on the same EHR software.

I can’t tell you how valuable it is for a clinic to be able to turn to other users when they run into trouble. One of the best ways to optimize your EHR is to interact and exchange ideas with other end users. That’s why I’ve started creating a list of EHR user conferences as well. However, for those who can’t take the time off to go to a user conference, an online discussion forum is a great alternative. I’m surprised that more EHR vendors don’t create these types of forums.

Seniors and WiFi

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had a number of long and deep discussions with people about seniors and their adoption of technology to deal with their health. So, I was really hit by this tweet I saw a few months ago about Seniors and their access to wifi:

I imagine that some would argue that many seniors don’t need wifi since they’re just going to use the internet on their phone. This is a fair point that’s worthy of deeper consideration and understanding. However, I find really interesting that so many seniors don’t have Wifi. I’ll be watching to see how this changes over time.

I guess the key healthcare question is: How important will wifi be to the future of healthcare?

While I love what’s happening in the mobile space, our data plans aren’t ready for what we can accomplish on wifi. I don’t see them getting there for a while either. Plus, our mobile phones become even more powerful when they’re connected to wifi. Kind of reminds me of the difference between when I paid for long distance by the minute versus our current unlimited long distance plan. That’s the difference between mobile data and wifi.

Of course, every good senior healthcare technology aficionado will tell you that in many cases the senior doesn’t need to have internet or be tech savvy. The seniors aren’t the ones that will use the technology. It’s the caregivers that are going to use the technology and you can be sure to a large majority of them have wifi.

EHR Replacement Roadmap to Success

Posted on July 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re just now starting down the road of the EHR replacement cycle. Meaningful use has driven many to adopt an EHR too quickly and now the buyer’s remorse is setting in and we’re going to see a wave of EHR replacements. Some organizations are going to wait until meaningful use runs it course, but many won’t even be able to wait.

With this prediction in mind, I was interested by this Allscripts whitepaper: Key Hidden Reasons Your EHR Is Not Sustainable and What To Do About It. I always learn a lot about a company when I read whitepapers like this one. It says a lot about the way the company thinks and where they’re taking their company.

For example, in the whitepaper, Allscripts provides a list of questions to consider when looking to replace your EHR:

  • How do you DEPLOY the right core IT systems to succeed with value-based care?
  • How do you CONNECT to coordinate care with key stakeholders and manage your population?
  • How do you better ENGAGE patients in their own health?
  • How do you analyze mountains of raw data to ADVANCE patient and financial outcomes?
  • How do you get everyone within your own organization to FOLLOW THE ROADMAP to EHR success?

You can see that these questions share a certain view of where healthcare IT and EHR is headed. Imagine how this criteria would compare with the criteria for EHR selection even five years ago. Although, I wonder how many doctors really share this type of approach to EHR selection. Do doctors really want their EHR to handle the above list? Should they be worrying about the above items?

I don’t doubt that doctors are going to be more involved in population health and they’re going to need to engage patients more. However, this list does seem to lack some of the practical realities that doctors still need from their EHR. In fact, as I write this, I wonder if it’s still too early to know what a next generation EHR will need to include. Of course, that won’t stop frustrated EHR users from replacing their EHR just the same.

10 Ways Many Dental Offices Are Breaching HIPAA

Posted on July 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Trevor James.

If you work in the health/dental/medical space, you already know that HIPAA violations are a serious matter. Fines today for not complying with HIPAA laws and regulations are a minimum of $100-$50,000 per violation or record and a maximum of $1.5 million per year for violations of the same provision. Some violations also carry criminal charges with them, resulting in jail time for the violators.

Many dental offices are breaching HIPAA laws without realizing it or have employees doing so without their knowledge.

If you’re a dentist, office manager, or someone who’s been tasked with ensuring HIPAA security within your group, here are the 10 most common ways dental offices are breaching HIPAA regulations so your practice doesn’t make the same mistakes as others.

1. Devices with patient information being stolen

This is a common HIPAA violation for dental offices. It’s important to ensure the devices your dental office uses, like USB flash drives, mobile devices and laptops, are carefully handled and securely stored to prevent them and the patient information on them from being stolen.

2. Losing a device with patient information

Along the same lines as above, it’s also easy (and common) for an employee to lose those kinds of devices. USB flash drives and mobile devices are smaller items, so it’s easy to misplace them. When that happens, it’s easy for sensitive patient information to end up in the wrong hands.

Train your employees on the importance of properly handling these devices and set up some sort of tracking device, like downloading the Find My iPhone app or Where’s My Droid, to help you locate a device if it ends up lost.

3. Improperly disposing of papers and devices with patient information

When it comes time to get rid of papers or devices containing dental records or billing information, be sure you properly dispose of them. Crumpling paper in a ball and throwing it in the trash isn’t the correct way to do things nor is shutting down a device and then tossing it in the garbage. Use a paper shredder and wipe your devices clean of all information before disposing of them.

4. Not restricting access to patient information

Unauthorized access to a patient’s dental information will get you in serious trouble with HIPAA. Patients trust your office with this personal information, so be smart when handling such information so other patients, employees and relatives who aren’t allowed access don’t come across it.

A dental practice breached HIPAA in a case relating to this when they put a red sticker reading “AIDS” on the outside cover of patient folders and those not needing to know said information were able to read it while employees handled the folders. Don’t make simple, costly mistakes like they did.

5. Hacking/IT incidences

Most patient dental information now is stored on computers, laptops, mobile devices, and in the cloud. Today’s technology allows dental practices to more easily communicate, and look up and share patient information or their status on these devices.

The downfall of this technology is the people who are just as smart or smarter than your technology and hack into your devices or systems to get their hands on patient information. Make sure every device has some type of passcode or authentication to get on, install encryptions and enable personal firewalls and security software.

6. Sending sensitive patient information over email

While it’s not a violation to send these kinds of emails, it is a violation if the email is intercepted and/or read by someone without authorized access. Use encryptions and double check that whomever you’re sending the email to is supposed to be receiving the email.

7. Leaving too much patient information over a phone message

A patient may give you the A-Okay to call them, but be sure you don’t leave a message disclosing too much of their information. A friend or family member could check your patient’s message and hear things they shouldn’t, making said patient upset, or equally as bad, you could call the wrong number and say more than you should, which would probably make your patient even more upset with you. Your safest bet when calling a patient and they don’t answer is to leave a message for them to call you back.

8. Not having a “Right to Revoke” clause

When your dental office creates its HIPAA forms, you have to give your patients the right to revoke the permissions they’ve given to disclose their private dental information to certain parties. Not providing this information means your HIPAA forms are invalid and releasing subsequent information to another party puts you in breach of HIPAA.

9. Employees sharing stories about patient cases

People talk. It’s a simple fact. Employees talk with one another and they also talk to patients every workday. Remind them, though, that discussing a patient’s information to an employee lacking authorized access or to other patients is unprofessional and puts your whole practice at risk of being fined by HIPAA.

10. Employees snooping through files

It might seem shocking — or maybe not to some — but employees have been caught snooping through patient and co-worker files before. They do this to find out information for themselves but also because relatives or friends ask them to find things out about a certain person. Snooping is wrong and unprofessional on all levels.

Make sure your employees are clear on this and that they understand how bad the consequences can be for them and your office for doing so.

HIPAA violations in dental offices are all too common. Now that you know the top 10 ways dental offices are breaching HIPAA, you can take every precaution necessary to prevent your practice from violating any HIPAA laws and regulations.

About The Author

Trevor James is the marketing manager for Dentrix Ascend, a cloud based dental practice management software and Viive, a dental practice software for Mac’s.

Value of Data, EMR Jobs, and EMR vs EHR

Posted on July 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I agree with Wen that the EMR and claims data needs to be cleaned up. I think it gives the wrong message to say it’s not meaningful though. Once it’s cleaned up, it has a lot of value.


How many of you have applied for a job because you saw it posted on Twitter? I’m really interested in this since I do a lot of health IT job posts on Twitter. We see quite a bit of traffic from Twitter to our healthcare IT job board, but I haven’t added a good way to track who signs up and applies for jobs. That’s next.


I love how academic Practice Fusion tries to make the discussion. I thought I made the discussion of EMR vs EHR much simpler.

HIPAA Risk Assessment Infographic

Posted on July 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ll admit that I’m a sucker for infographics. I usually post the various EHR infographics I find on EMR Thoughts, but this one seemed more appropriate to post on EMR and HIPAA. You can find all of the various EHR and Health IT infographics I’ve posted on this Healthcare IT Infographic pinterest board as well.

Thanks to Coalfire for putting together this HIPAA Security Risk Analysis Myths infographic.

Update: David Harlow offered this interesting note that might be helpful to some “The infographic suggests that only covered entities need to undergo a security risk assessment. In the EHR context that makes sense, since them with EHRs are CEs, but of course Business Associates need to do this too.”

HIPAA Risk Assessment Infographic

Practical Application of Watson with EHR

Posted on July 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since Watson made its debut on Jeopardy, I haven’t been able to not check out what Watson was doing next. No doubt what Watson did on Jeopardy was impressive. However, it’s one thing to do what it did on Watson. It’s another thing to commercialize the Watson into something useful.

I’d long been hearing that Watson was going to be great for healthcare IT and that healthcare would really benefit from the technology. However, everything I saw felt very conceptual as opposed to practical and implemented. So, I was really interested in talking with Modernizing Medicine about their EHR integration with Watson.

You can find my interview with Daniel Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Founders of Modernizing Medicine, talking about Watson and some of the other cool ways they’re trying to help doctors make use of the data in an EHR in the video below. Plus, we even talk ICD-10 and MU 2 delay as well.

Note: Modernizing Medicine is a Healthcare Scene advertiser.

Taking Down Dr. Oz

Posted on July 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I briefly mentioned Dr. Oz in my recent post about NY Med (and the healthcare social media firing). It’s clear to anyone watching the show that Dr. Oz is there for the celebrity factor and not for the actual medical work. He’s always “partnered” with another cardiologist who provides the actual patient care. Of course, I don’t really care too much that he’s on it or not. If it gives them a boost in ratings, good. I like the show.

However, I don’t know a single doctor that likes Dr. Oz and I know many of them who hate Dr. Oz. With this in mind, I found this interview with a medical student whose trying to “take down” Dr. Oz quite interesting. Here’s a short take on what this med student is doing:

Last year, Mazer brought a policy before the Medical Society of the State of New York—where Dr. Oz is licensed—requesting that they consider regulating the advice of famous physicians in the media. His idea: Treat health advice on TV in the same vein as expert testimony, which already has established guidelines for truthfulness.

Although, this quote is really powerful as well, “DR. OZ HAS SOMETHING LIKE 4-MILLION VIEWERS A DAY. THE AVERAGE PHYSICIAN DOESN’T SEE A MILLION PATIENTS IN THEIR LIFETIME.”

This is absolutely one of the problems with social media and other medium like television. The person with the biggest voice doesn’t always have the best information. In fact, sometimes the wrong information is the best way to grow an audience. What’s popular is not always what’s right.

Mazer in his interview highlights the biggest problem with some of the things that Dr. Oz says. The movement in healthcare has largely been towards evidence based medicine. I think that movement will only grow stronger as we can prove the effectiveness of care even better. However, many of the things on Dr. Oz’s show go contrary to evidence based medicine. This leaves the patient-doctor relationship at a cross roads when a patient chooses to follow something they’ve seen on TV versus the advice of the doctor (even if the doctor is on the side of evidence).

Dr. Oz aside, the same principle applies to other information patients might find on the internet. Many doctors would like to just brush this aside and say that patients should “trust” them since there’s bad information on the internet or there’s a bigger picture. That might work in the short term, but won’t last long term.

Long term doctors are going to have to take a collaborative approach with patients. As patients we just have to be careful that we don’t take it too far. Collaboration means that the patient needs to be collaborative as well.

The other way for doctors to battle the misinformation out there is to provide quality sources of trusted information. One way this will happen is on the physician website. Instead of being a glorified yellow page ad, the physician website is going to have to do more to engage and educate patients. That’s part of the opportunity and vision for Physia. It’s an exciting time to be in healthcare…if you like change.

What’s in the DNA of Your Mobile Health Startup?

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over the years I’ve learned a lot about startup companies. I love startup companies and I love working with people who can start with nothing and create something interesting. We need more of that in healthcare.

I recently realized how important it is that a health startup company realizes who they are and what’s in their DNA. As a startup company you don’t have the money or resources to be able to attack multiple markets, multiple product lines and see what works. So, it’s extremely important that you know who you are and don’t try and be something you’re not.

A great example of this is reflected in this questions: Are you an enterprise company or a slow and steady bootstrapper?

This question explains a totally different mentality when it comes to a startup company. Both of them can work, but these two types of startup companies will act very different. You shouldn’t mix the two or you’ll waste your limited resources in the process.

Let me explain a little better. A health startup company that is an “enterprise company” has to create an enterprise product. This means including enterprise features. This also means that you’ll need to prepare for the enterprise sales process. It’s much more involved and much more difficult. However, when you make a sale, they are for half a million dollars minimum. It’s a high risk, high reward way to approach building a product, but can work really well if you can solve an enterprise problem or are working in a space where the enterprise has allocated money. The enterprise approach takes quite a bit of up front capital to build the enterprise features and enterprise sales force required to be a success. While this has a high bar to participate it also means you won’t have nearly as many competitors.

On the other hand is the slow and steady bootstrapped approach. Instead of going after the big enterprise customers, this startup focuses on creating the simplest product possible that provides value to a company or even an individual. Instead of building an entire salesforce, they can rely on direct customer sales using social media, advertising, and other direct to consumer marketing techniques. They have to focus on user acquisition, user churn, and user referrals to grow the business. Instead of trying to build an enterprise product they focus on a very specific piece of value and deliver just that one thing. Over time this may eventually lead to an enterprise product and they may use the initial small customers to get them into the larger customers, but that’s not the focus of the growth of the business. That’s a long range plan.

What I’ve found is that many startups don’t know what type of company they are and so they waste a lot of resources trying both sides. This is a mistake that can be easily avoided. Figure out which type of company you want to be and build a culture around that approach. That doesn’t mean that you might not adjust course and try something different later. However, in the beginning it’s a mistake for most companies to try and be a direct to consumer product and an enterprise product at the same time.