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Going Beyond EHR Data Collection to EHR Data Use with Dr. Dan Riskin

Posted on December 5, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We had a chance to sit down and do a Google Plus hangout with Dan Riskin, MD, CEO and co-founder of Health Fidelity to discuss the challenges of EHR today and how we can reach the real benefits of EHR adoption. We had a great discussion about how the industry is so caught up just getting the data in the EHR software that we’re missing out on the opportunity to get the benefits of actually using the EHR data.

For some reason the Google hangout audio and video didn’t sink right (welcome to the cutting edge of technology), but the audio is good. Just start up the video below and enjoy listening to it like a podcast or radio show. I expect that’s what most of you do anyway with our videos.

I hope you’ll enjoy my interview with Dr. Riskin.

EHR Helps Researchers Find Genetic Connections To Disease

Posted on I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A group of researchers have completed a study which found new links between patients’ genetic profile and specific diseases by mining EMR data, reports a story in iHealthBeat.

The research, which was conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a consortium of medical research institutions including the Mayo Clinic and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, analyzed data from about 13,000 of EMRs.

The participants then grouped about 15,000 billing codes contained in the EMRs into 1,600 disease categories. Next, they looked for links to diseases in EMRs which contained DNA data.

The researchers, whose study was published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, found  63 new genetic links to diseases, ranging from skin cancer to anemia, iHealthBeat said.

The EMR study method, which is known as a phenome-wide association study, is a departure from the 13-year old genome-wide association model, which has been used to search for common mutations in the DNA of patients of people with the same diseases.

Co-author Joshua Denny, a biomedical informatics researcher at Vanderbilt, says that the newer method can help link seemingly unrelated symptoms, detect potentially harmful side effects of a drug, and help find new uses for drugs.

This is just the tip of the iceberg where translation medicine and EMRs are concerned. Using EMRs to conduct genomic research is becoming an increasingly popular exercise, cutting across a wide range of clinical disciplines.

And it’s not just institutional academic research houses getting into the act. For example, this summer a large northern Virginia hospital announced that it had struck a deal with a Massachusetts analytics firm to see if data mined from EMRs can better predict the risk of preterm live birth.

Now, genomics research is not for just any hospital — it’s obviously a major undertaking — but I think it’s likely more hospitals will get into the game. By this time next year I think there will be a crop of interesting new genomics projects mining EMRs. Although, it will be interesting to see how the 23andMe FDA battle impacts this as well.

Fitness Wearables Not Used By Those Who Can Benefit

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was reading a popular tech blog called PandoDaily and they had an interesting article that talks about those who can really benefit from Fitness Wearables aren’t using them.

When I think about the top Fitness wearables the conclusion from the study makes sense. If I’m an inactive, overweight person, then do I want to pay for a wearable device that will tell me how inactive and overweight I am? It’s definitely a challenging adoption problem. We have a whole weight loss industry that proves that solving it is not a simple task.

I think a similar thing is found with almost all mobile health apps as well. Those who could really benefit from those mobile health apps aren’t using them. I don’t have any data on this, but I bet if we dug into it we’d find it to be the case. Plus, if you look at mHealth adoption over all, we know that a lot of the apps aren’t getting used much at all.

From now on whenever I look at a mobile health app and they tell me about adoption, I’m going to ask myself if the people who can benefit most from that technology are using it.