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Submit and Vote on BlueButton Ideas

Posted on June 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At Health Datapalooza, Health Tech Hatch announced the Blue Button CoDesign Challenge. Certainly we’ve seen hundreds of challenges come out over the past couple years, but this challenge is a bit different.

Most challenges provide a prize for some goal and then teams of people get together to create a product or service that helps achieve that goal. In the BlueButton CoDesign Challenge they’re starting by asking patients the question, “Build me a Blue Button-enabled tool that….” So far 74 ideas have been submitted as answers to that question. Hundreds of comments have been added on each idea and thousands have voted on which idea has the most potential.

I do have some concern with how they’re doing the voting. I think it’s a mistake to display how many votes each idea has, because then it skews people’s future vote. The same goes for listing the top ideas on the home page. That encourages the casual visitor to just vote on the top ideas which gives the top ideas an unfair advantage. Plus, if someone like me tweets out my idea and gets my followers to vote for me, then I automatically skew to the top page. In fact, this voting reminds me a bit of the upper right quadrant syndrome that Jonathan Bush talked about at TEDMED.

Of course, there are always issues when you deal with voting. However, I love the idea of getting the patient crowd involved in sharing their ideas of how to make healthcare better. For example, e-Patient Dave offered this great idea on managing the pills you take. He’s right that all of the data is there, so why hasn’t someone built it? The answer is likely that it’s not the focus of the people that have the data. This is why EHR APIs are so important.

Just reading through the list of ideas is quite inspiring. I’ll be interested to see which ideas win and if any developers jump on board to build those ideas. The problem with most people is that they’d rather build their own ideas than someone else’s.

4500 Patient Records Found During Drug Bust

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the healthcare world, it seems that HIPAA privacy violations & HIPAA Lawsuits are the car accidents that people can’t resist checking out. In most cases, people in healthcare are mostly interested to see what happened with the HIPAA violation and what the consequences were for that violation. In fact, these violations wake people up to the HIPAA policies better than any other means, but I digress.

Since this blog is called EMR and HIPAA, I try and cover various HIPAA related issues I hear about in the news. Today’s HIPAA breach is pretty crazy. It was discovered during a drug bust by the Alameda County Sheriff’s department. During the drug related investigation they found information for 4,500 patients from three hospitals: Alta Bates Summit, Sutter Delta, and Eden Medical Center.

Sutter Health posted a notice about the breach. The notice says that the information could have included: a patient’s name, Social Security number, date of birth, gender, address, zip code, home phone number, marital status, name of employer and work phone number. Sutter has offered free credit monitoring services for those patients who are involved. Plus, they have a hotline set up for those who have questions.

This situation is a bit unique since it seems they haven’t been able to identify exactly which hospital the patients are from. If that’s the case, then releasing all of the patient data to all 3 hospitals could be a breach as well, no? I’m good with making sure you notify everyone on the list that could be affected. They should be notified, but I’d be interested to know which parts of the 4,500 patients was shared with which hospital.

I wonder if large organizations like Sutter Health are creating a permanent department for breaches.