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High Costs of Health IT, ePrescribing, and HIE — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on June 29, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

The following is our regularly scheduled roundup of tweets from yesterday’s #HITsm chat. You can also check out John’s blog post on yesterdays #HITsm topics.

Topic One: Costs vs benefits. Will high costs always be the #1 barrier cited to #healthIT adoption?

 

Topic Two: Why does ePrescribing have such widespread acceptance while #telehealth adoption is so low?

 

Topic Three: #HIE as a noun or a verb? Does negative press for HIE organization$ hinder health data exchange as a whole?

#HITsm T4: Is #CommonWell just a bully in a fairy godmother costume?

 

Topic Five: Open forum: What #HealthIT topic had your attention this week?

Marketing Your Medical Practice in the Digital (Social) Age

Posted on June 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Saturday, June 30, Tweeters, Instagramers, Pinners and the like will gather to celebrate the fourth annual Social Media Day, presented by Mashable, a leading online source for news and information focused on the Connected Generation. And each year, social media plays a greater role in #healthcare and #HealthIT. Here are a few stats from recent months:

  • 51% of those surveyed say that digital health communications would make them feel more valued as a patient
  • 90% of adults 18-24 years of age say they would trust medical information shared by others in their social media networks
  • 41% of people say social media would affect their choice of health care provider

To raise awareness about the social media benefits for health care professionals, I asked Dr. Lawrence Rosen, an athenahealth client, social-savvy clinician, practice owner and influencer, about best practices and tips for marketing a medical practice on social networks.

When did you realize it was time to put your practice on Facebook? When was that ‘a-ha’ moment?

It happened the day I started my practice, The Whole Child Center, in 2008. I recognized that savvy parents were using Facebook to gather and share information about their kids. They not only wanted to post photos of their one-year-old’s birthday party but also wanted to interact with their health care providers. I thought it would be great if we could develop this online community to build on the brick-and-mortar community we developed within the four walls of our practice.

To create an effective Facebook strategy, it’s key to know your audience and what you’d like them to do. Who are your Facebook target audiences? Are you surprised by any groups that you’re reaching?

As a pediatrician, my primary target audience is easy—moms. And for Facebook, that’s a key demographic. Recent insights showed that 80% of our Facebook audience is women with more than 60% ages 25-44.

The most surprising demographic? Other health care practitioners interested in the unique integrative and eco-sustainable approach we take to medicine.

Discuss the types of content you have generated and how you personally grown your Facebook presence and, in essence, your practice.

Initially, our content was mostly health information, current articles and trends in the news. I then realized that photos and videos garnered much more interest, so we developed a space for parents to post photos of their kids having fun in our office. With HIPAA concerns, we are really careful to never post patient information directly, but parents can certainly share information about their own experiences, and they love sharing these pictures. Also, I’ve found videos of my media appearances or webinars, when posted on seasonal or topical issues, always get a lot of likes and shares.

What are examples of online content that have increased visibility or engagement for your practice? 

The most gratifying and widespread content has been related to our response to the 2012 Hurricane Sandy tragedy in New Jersey and New York. We posted a call for new or gently used baby equipment—strollers, car seats, high chairs—for one of our practice’s  moms to deliver to a devastated section of Queens, NY.  In one week, we gathered enough donations to fill a box truck. This mom, who had family in the damaged area, was so thrilled to partner with us, and it really helped raise awareness in our area of the plight of young families.

Are there any rules of the road, things people should remember when marketing their practice on a social network?

Don’t post private information. Don’t pester your audience by posting 40 things a day. Be strategic, know your audience, pay attention to what people like and share, and keep your content relevant to hot topics, and local or regional health issues. In general, stay away from divisive political or religious issues.

What you post is going to be seen as a reflection of your organization’s values and will positively or negatively affect your reputation. Recognize the power of your social network to engage and build your community.

Dr. Rosen is an integrative pediatrician based in Oradell, N.J. and a contributor to the athenahealth blog

3 Keys to Healthcare Gaming

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jonah Comstock has a great article over on mobi health news about Ayogo building an adherence game for big pharma. The article is short on details since Michael Fergusson, CEO of Ayogo, wasn’t given permission to demonstrate the game. However, the article highlights three elements that I have yet to see really done well in the “gaming healthcare” space. Each one of them is incredibly powerful and could change healthcare, but I have yet to see them implemented well. They are:

  • Social
  • Fun
  • Competition

I can’t think of three more powerful motivators that exist. People love to be social (see Facebook). We love to have fun. Most of us also love a good competition.

It sounds like Ayogo is trying incorporate all 3 of these elements into an ARG (Alternate Reality Game) that helps to improve prescription compliance. You don’t need all 3 elements to create a successful application, but how powerful it is if you can nail all three of them.

I think the concept of healthcare gaming is an important one and someone is going to finally crack the code. The problem I’ve seen is that the healthcare games I’ve seen too date are too much healthcare and not enough game. As I’ve written about before, health improvement needs to be a side effect of enjoying the game. Basically, you should want to play the game whether there was a health benefit or not. That’s a high barrier to overcome, but has a nice pot of gold waiting on the other side for whoever cracks the code.

Hacking HIPAA – Patient Focused Common Notice of Privacy Practices

Posted on June 27, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

How can you not be interested in an article that talks about hacking? Of course, in this case I’m talking about hacking in a much more general since. Most people think of hacking as some nefarious person compromising a system they shouldn’t be accessing. The broader use of the term hack is to create something that fixes a problem. You “hack” something together to make it work.

This is what David Harlow, Ian Eslick, and Fred Trotter had in mind when they got together to hack HIPAA. They wanted to create a HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices (NPP) that would provide meaningful privacy choices for patients while still enabling the use of the latest technology. Far too often HIPAA as seen as an excuse for why doctors don’t use technology. However, if the NPP is set up correctly, it can enhance patient privacy while allowing use of the latest technologies in your practice.

The Hacking HIPAA team decided to leverage the power of crowdfunding to see if they could collaboratively develop a patient focused Notice of Privacy Practices. I really love the idea of a Common Notice of Privacy Practices. If you like this idea, you can help fund the Hacking HIPAA project on MedStartr.

For those not familiar with crowdfunding, imagine your healthcare organization getting $10,000 worth of legal work from one of the top healthcare lawyers for only $1000. Looked at another way, you get an updated Notice of Privacy Practices with all the latest HIPAA omnibus rules incorporated for only $1000. Call your lawyer and see if they’d be willing to provide an NPP for that price. Plus, your lawyer probably will just provide you some cookie cutter NPP they find as opposed to a well thought out NPP.

This is such a great idea. I hope that a large number of healthcare organizations get behind the project. I’d also love to see some of the HIPAA disclosure companies and EHR companies support the project as well. The NPP will have a creative commons license so those companies could help fund the project, provide feedback in the creation of the NPP and then distribute the NPP to all of their customers. What better way to build the relationship with your customers than to provide them a well thought out NPP?

If you want a little more information on how the Hacking HIPAA project came together, here’s a video of Fred Trotter talking about it. Also, be sure to read the details on the Hacking HIPAA MedStartr page.

CPOE and MU with Marc Probst and M*Modal

Posted on June 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As part of my ongoing series of EHR videos, I had the chance to sit down with Marc Probst, CIO of Intermountain and a member of a number of important healthcare IT committees, Mike Raymer, Senior Vice President of Solutions Management at M*Modal and Dr. Jonathan Handler, CMIO of M*Modal to talk about CPOE and Meaningful Use. It’s another great addition to the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel.

In the interview we have a chance to talk about Intermountain’s move from zero CPOE to mobile, voice recognized CPOE. We talk about the future possibilities of voice in healthcare. I also ask Marc Probst about his views on EHR certification, meaningful use, and CommonWell.


*Note: Marc Probst’s sound was less than ideal. Next time we’ll be sure he has a better microphone.

Pain Squad App Helps Adolescent Cancer Patients

Posted on I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

I can’t even imagine what a scary experience it would be to have cancer, let along as a child. One of the ways to treat the symptoms of cancer is to understand the pain level, and what the patient is feeling. However, that can be difficult to get a full grasp on, especially in children. If they aren’t tracking it daily, then information collected can be flawed.

Last year, an app was released in beta testing at a Canadian hospital in Toronto to help doctors understand more fully what their younger patients were feeling as they underwent cancer treatment. The app, called Pain Squad, was developed using the feedback from children and teenagers who had cancer. It involves pain surveys that have to be filled out twice daily, but involves the child and engages them.

The app features videos of celebrities from popular law enforcement shows, Rookie Blue and Flashpoint, giving motivation to kids as they do a certain amount of journals in a row, and they can be promoted to different ranks. This video does a great job of explaining the app, and shows some of the videos. They are so motivating!

I really liked this quote, from the parents of a little girl named Olivia, who was a study participant:

Filling out a paper pain journal was like homework. The Pain Squad app is interactive and the more Olivia used it, the more rewards she got. It only takes a few minutes to complete but it gave Olivia a better understanding of and more control over her pain.”

Last year, this was in some of the final stages of testing, and because of it’s success, it was set to be released in other areas in Canada, as well as outside of Canada. I’m not sure if it’s officially been released since then, but I love the idea of this. There’s only so much you can determine from asking someone to point at a smiley face on a poster board to describe their pain level (I personally never really know what to say when I’m confronted with that sign!)

This app is designed for the iPhone.

Bill Would Offer More Ways To Avoid Medicare EMR Cut

Posted on June 25, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Federal lawmakers have introduced a bill which would grow the list of exemptions physicians could seek to the Medicare penalties faced by those not meaningfully using an EMR.

The bill, which was filed in the House by Rep. Diane Black (R, Tenn) would add new hardship exemptions to an existing list which would help solo practice physicians and doctors who are approaching retirement, according to American Medical News.

As readers probably know, most doctors who don’t have a meaningfully-used EMR in place by July 2014 — roughly a year from now — face cuts to to Medicare reimbursement starting in 2015.  The penalty cuts would lower Medicare reimbursement by 1 percent in 2015, and would climb to 3 percent by 2017.

Some physicians already enjoy exemptions from the cuts, AMN notes. Doctors who:

  • Have insufficient Internet access or who face insurmountable barriers to obtaining infrastructure, such as high-speed or broadband Internet.
  • Begin practicing in 2015.
  • Encounter unforeseen circumstances, such as a natural disaster or other unforeseeable barrier.
  • Lack face-to-face interaction with patients or follow-up opportunities with patients.
  • Practice in multiple locations and do not control access to EHRs during more than 50% of patient encounters.

Are already eligible for exemptions from the pending Medicare cuts, AMN reports.

The new bill would extend the above list of hardship exemptions to doctors in a solo practice. It would also offer an exemption for physicians who are 62 or older by the last day of 2015, or who will reach age 62 by 2020, according to the magazine.

It seems like the help with the cuts is needed for solo physicians in particular. According to the National Center for Health Statistics at t he CDC, only 29 percent of solo practitioners had adopted EMRs by 2011.  While that number may have climbed since 2011, solo docs are doubtless still way behind in adoption, and slapping them with reimbursement cuts simply may not make sense.

“The Kaiser Way” – Kaiser Permanente’s Approach to Mobile Healthcare

Posted on June 24, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Kaiser Permanente is the healthcare provider I went to since the time I was born, until I went to college. Imagine my surprise when I headed off to school and discover that it didn’t even exist in the state I moved to. In my limited scope of knowledge, I think I thought Kaiser was the only healthcare provider out there!

Even though I’ve come to realize there is definitely more than one healthcare provider out there, I think I’ll always like Kaiser. My husband and I are back in Colorado, and are currently working to get a plan covered by Kaiser. As I’ve heard my parents talk about them, and seen some of the services offered, I’ve been impressed with what they have to offer, and how it seems like they’ve been very involved in mobile healthcare. So I wasn’t too surprised when I saw this article that talks about how Kaiser has made it possible for their patient’s to connect with their doctors via email.

In the article, Bernard J. Tyson, Kaiser Permanente’s Incoming Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, said of this mobile app that “It’s something our members wanted, they have it and they love it.” I think that this goes to show that Kaiser is really trying to be intune with the changing healthcare world, and what their patients wnat. Since being launched, there have been 14 million e-visits, Tyson said, and members can access these visits through a free mobile app.

Patients are able to connect with their doctor through the app by emailing them questions, making appointments, and accessing lab results. It allows patients to decide whether or not they actually need to make an appointment, as well as build a stronger relationship with their physician. Kaiser has worked hard to ensure the safety of the patients using this app, as that is definitely a big concern across the board when it comes to mHealth.

Personally, I love the idea about being able to email your physician. Back in Utah, I was overall impressed with the patient portals that were available to me, but I was disappointed that it wasn’t easier to connect with my doctors. In fact, there was one instance where I tried to get in contact with a physician for over a month, just getting the run around from her assistants, and I eventually just gave up. The doctor seemed very on top of things, but her staff was not, and I always wished I had been able to just contact her quickly and easily through a method like the one that Kaiser has in place.

I won’t go over everything that is talked about in this article, but I highly recommend reading it. It sounds like Kaiser has a lot in store for the future. Tyson mentioned that the obvious next “natural progression” is for telehealth. I really found this article to be really excited, and I can’t wait to see what Kaiser has in store. Hopefully other healthcare systems will take note and follow in their suite.

The Path to Healthcare Interoperability Standards

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the issues associated with healthcare interoperability. One of the biggest excuses/problems out there is the idea of interoperability standards. Healthcare certainly has plenty of interoperability standards, but adoption and implementation of the actual standards has been the major issue.

I do think that meaningful use and EHR certification is making some difference in regards to standards. I think that Direct Project is likely going to become a pretty solid standard for exchanging some healthcare documents. However, it’s limited in it’s scope.

Instead, I think we’re going to see a different path to healthcare interoperability. It’s going to be led by a few prominent organizations that start sharing info. Once those organizations start sharing data, whatever standard they use will start to spread and will become the standard for interoperability in healthcare.

Which organization or group of organizations will be the ones that break out and establish the standard? I still think the jury is out on that one, but a couple prime candidates are: CommonWell and Healtheway.

I’d love to hear if you see another path to healthcare interoperability or other initiatives that could break through and be successful.

Obsolete Office Visits, Tracking Customer Behavior, and More — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on June 22, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

John did a full writeup on these topics before the #HITsm chat. Be sure to read his thoughts on Healthcare Unbound.

Topic One: So how long will it be before office visits are no longer the norm? (via Mark Blatt, MD, CMIO Intel)

Topic Two: What technologies will lead the way?

Topic Three: How will these at-home and mobile technologies integrate with existing systems?

 

Topic Four: Aetna’s CarePass will track customer behavior. Will this become the norm, is it a good thing?