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Google Gets Into Activity Tracking

Posted on January 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fierce Mobile Healthcare has a great article up talking about Google entering the activity tracking market with an Android app called Google Now. Turns out that Google Now is a lot more than just a fitness activity tracker. I think that Google looks at Google Now as the smart part of your phone that keeps track of what you’re doing and tries to provide real time information based upon all the data about you. It’s the next level Siri if you want to think about it that way. So, it makes sense that Google Now would also try and understand your health in the process.

While it’s interesting to see Google get back into the Health game after the failure of Google Health to get any traction, I think this is a really smart move. Plus, why isn’t the smartphone your activity tracking device? I know very few people who leave their house without their smartphone, but I know very few people who want to wear any other device all day every day.

Sure, your smartphone won’t track your activity level perfectly, but it can get pretty close. The battery won’t last as long as the other activity trackers along with other issues. However, when you look a the core technology in the fitness trackers and your smartphone, they are pretty close. I’ll reach out to some of my mHealth device friends to get their thoughts on the difference. Maybe there are a number of other issues I’m not thinking about.

We’ll see how this evolves, but the more we can make mHealth activity tracking a normal part of people’s routine, the more likely we’ll see results from it.

EHR Benefit – Transcription Costs Savings

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Transcription Costs Savings
When I first writing about EMR (yes, it was only called EMR at the time), this was probably the biggest reason that doctors gave for implementing an EMR in their office. Doctors looked at their transcription costs and saw EMR as a great way to replace those transcription costs. Or at least the doctors could use the transcription cost savings to pay for the EMR.

This has proven true for many doctors and no doubt was the financial mechanism that many practices used to go electronic. In fact, I always wondered if the transcription world was on a final death march thanks to EMR. My view of transcription has greatly evolved over the years. In fact, I think we’re seeing a resurgence of transcription in healthcare.

The reason for the renewed interest in transcription is because a large number of providers that start using EHR are tired and overwhelmed by the “number of clicks” that are required by an EHR. When a doctor reaches this point, there immediate reaction is “EMR is so much slower than transcription” or the related “I miss my transcription.”

I always found EMRs that facilitated transcription a little odd, but considering the above trend they might be well positioned to capitalize on those doctors who want to use transcription with their EHR. Plus, the transcription industry is shifting as well. They’re moving quickly away from just being simple transcriptionists to embracing coding and other ways to assist in the clinical documentation process. Considering the complexity of ICD-10, this might be an interesting opportunity.

What does seem clear is that doctors will be more and more interested in ways to streamline the EMR documentation process. I won’t be surprised if many doctors choose transcription as a way to accomplish this goal. Although, I’m not sure this will be the case with new doctors. Transcription has its own learning curve and I don’t see many new doctors who don’t have transcription experience going that direction.

In the end, it’s hard to really say whether transcription cost savings is an EHR benefit. In many cases it could be. Certainly the shrinking transcription industry would agree that many doctors are saving money on their transcription costs. Although, it depends on the clinic and whether they cut out their transcription when they implement their EHR. While we might see some return to transcription, I expect that long term the transcription industry will need to evolve or die as most next generation doctors won’t even consider the idea of transcription.