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EMR and EHR Ads

Posted on January 31, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems fitting on Super Bowl week to take a second and look at the advertisers that make what we do here at EMR and HIPAA possible. None of their ads cost $1-2 million like the Super Bowl ads, but if you’re looking for some great Healthcare IT and EHR products then you’ve come to the right place. If you like what we do here at EMR and HIPAA, then take a minute and see the advertisers who like what we do as well.

Also, I have a special ad promotion for new advertisers from now through the middle of February. If you’re interested in knowing the details, drop me a note on our Contact Us page.

New EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
Canon – I can’t imagine anyone reading this needs an introduction to Canon. In the Healthcare IT space they offer a suite of scanners, printers and copiers that are found in healthcare organizations across the country. I even have the Canon imageFORMULA DR-C125 in my house and use it regularly. The need for heavy duty scanners in healthcare isn’t going to go away for a long time. I’m glad to have Canon on board as an advertiser.

iPatientCare – EHR vendors always do well as advertisers on EMR and HIPAA and so it’s great to have iPatientCare as a new advertiser. They provide the full suite of EHR, PMS, PHR, HIE, and Mobile that you could need along with all the important EHR and meaningful use certifications. I see that they’re going to be exhibiting at HIMSS at Booth #5519 if you want to check them out at HIMSS. Plus, I love that their website has an image that says they won 9 TEPR Awards. Many of you probably won’t even know what TEPR is since it’s no longer around. However, TEPR was a conference focused exclusively on EHR (although it was probably called EMR back then since it was before EHR became in Vogue). The fact that they won awards at TEPR shows how long iPatientCare’s been doing EHR.

simplifyMD – I first started working with simplifyMD when they graciously sponsored the New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2012 (The 2013 event will be announced shortly, but save Tuesday, March 5th from 6-8 on your calendar). It was a great event and they were a great sponsor. simplifyMD is a certifed EHR vendor that strives to tailor their EHR workflow to the doctor’s current workflow. Something that dotors love to hear and experience from their EHR. They’re a web based EHR. Plus, they recently came out with these great simplifyMD and EHR cartoons. I’m sure I’ll be featuring more of their cartoons in the future.

Returning EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
Sfax – I call Sfax a returning advertiser because they first started advertising on EMR and HIPAA back in December of 2009. So, they supported EMR and HIPAA back when we were just starting to get some traction. After a short hiatus, they’re back as an advertiser. What many don’t realize is that Sfax handles the faxing for a large number of the EHR vendors out there. While I generally avoid faxing as much as possible, sometimes it can’t be avoided and so I’m always grateful I can just send a fax similar to how I send an email using Sfax. Word on the street is that they have the next version of their software coming out soon. I’m excited to check it out.

Mitochon – Similar to Sfax, Mitochon first started advertising on EMR and HIPAA back in Decmber of 2010. After a short break they’re back again as advertisers. I’ve really enjoyed watching Mitochon mature as a Free EHR vendor (They do offer the full suite of free services: PM, EMR, HIE, etc). When Mitochon first started advertising with me, they were a brand new company with a big vision and lots of ideas, but still a lot of work to do. They’ve come a long way since then with their product and their company. One example of that was in their mobile EHR solution that I wrote about previously.

Renewing EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
A big thanks to all these renewing advertisers. It’s beautiful seeing so many of them supporting us for so long.
Practice Fusion – Advertising since April 2010
EMR Consultant – Advertising since July 2009
Amazing Charts – Advertising since May 2010
Cerner – Advertising since September 2011

I’m very appreciative of those advertisers who support the work we do. As I look at the stats for the advertisers, I’m really happy that we’re providing real value to their companies.

EHR Benefit – Space Savings

Posted on January 30, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Space Savings
I’ve heard many clinics use the space savings as a great way to justify the cost of their EHR. This works better in the small physician office market than it does in the hospital market, but the principles are similar. However, the scale is different.

The obvious space savings is the storage of all the paper charts. While many clinics are quite creative in how they’ve stored paper charts (see the walls around the front desk of many clinics), the most common storage is a chart room dedicated to the storage of all the paper charts. Each state has its own requirements for the retention of paper charts, but its usually somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 years. 6 years of paper charts amounts to a lot of storage space. Plus, many doctors I know keep their paper charts well beyond the required retention period (the liability of doing so is a different discussion).

There are many different approaches to dealing with your paper charts during an EHR implementation. Many continue referencing and pulling the paper chart, but just start any future documentation in the EHR. Others scan the patient charts for the following day’s appointments. Others choose to only scan parts of the paper chart similar to how they use to “thin” the paper charts. In each of these situations, the space savings will start to accrue over time, but you won’t experience a big space opening up right away.

One way that some clinics gain space is by moving the charts from a very accessible place to one less accessible. As you move to EMR, there isn’t as much of a need to access the old paper charts and so you can often optimize your space in a way to free up the previous paper chart storage space and move the paper charts to a different space in your office.

Another option many clinics are doing is outsourcing the scanning of all their old paper charts to an outside company. While not the topic of this post, the cost and quality of such outsourced scanning has made it a really attractive option for many clinics. Many chart scanning companies will even do clinical data abstraction as I’ve written about before. In this case, all of your paper charts get scanned into digital form and you no longer have any paper charts storage needed at your office. It’s always amazing to see an entire room full of paper charts sitting on a little hard drive.

I’ve heard of clinics use the previous chart storage space in a variety of ways. The most interesting is when the previous chart storage space is turned into an exam room(s). This extra exam room can allow a clinic to see more patients or even hire another provider who sees patients in their clinic. In this current fee for service environment, that translates directly to dollar signs for the clinic. If you can achieve this during your EHR implementation, it’s a great way to justify the cost of the EHR and is a tremendous financial benefit to consider.

In other cases, the chart room is turned into an office for the billing staff, practice manager, nurses, or doctor. Doing so can’t easily translate to a specific dollar amount, but can also lead to valuable benefits such as employee satisfaction, quality of care, quality of billing, etc.

Saving space isn’t always a result of implementing an EHR, but it can be in many EHR implementations. So, consider how the chart storage space can benefit your clinic.

Track Infants Growth With BeCuddle iPhone App

Posted on I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

When there’s a baby around, it’s sometimes hard to keep track of time. At least that’s how I feel. Especially in those first few months, with round the clock feedings, erratic nap schedules, and doctor’s appointments. BeCuddle, a new app created just for parents, aims to  make life a little bit easier.

BeCuddle not only makes it easy to keep track of diaper changes and feedings, but milestones, growth, and even medicine. There’s quite a few apps out there that help with each of these things, but this is the first one I’ve seen that combine them all into one.

There are several categories that can be tracked — sleep, feeding, growth, milestones and medical.

screenshot

Because of all the health problems my son has had, I really like the medical section. It has the option to add doctors visits, record vaccines, and, my favorite, keep track of medicines. My son has been on at least one medication since he was just one month old, and it has sometimes been hard to remember when we gave him what. Obviously, an infants medicine intake needs to be carefully monitored, and I would have loved to have something like this.

This app really makes it easy to keep track of growth of an infant. I think it could also be helpful to show a pediatrician, such as if they are inquiring about how much a baby is eating, their urine output, or milestones. Half the time when we are at the doctor and discussing things, I have no idea what to say, and it would be so nice to be able to pull out my phone and give some hard facts.

Overall, I really liked this. Although my son is quickly leaving the infant stage (he’ll be one on March 6th!,) I will definitely keep this in mind for our next baby. It is available for the iPhone only right now, though I hope it will be available for Android as well. One specifically made for the iPad would be nice too. It’s also free, which makes it even better in my eyes.

Download for free here.

Problems EMRs Don’t (Necessarily) Cause

Posted on January 29, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In publications like this one, we spend a lot of time and energy clubbing EMRs and EMR vendors for the problems they cause.  That’s all well and good, but it’s also worth remembering that some of the big problems surrounding medical operations may not be due to EMR use:

* HIPAA carelessness:  When someone shouts private medical information across a room, or loses a flash drive or tablet with records on it, or leaves patient records in a public place, you’ve probably got a nasty HIPAA violation. But the EMR almost certainly had nothing to do with it.

* Clumsy office workflow:  Sure, introducing an EMR into a clinical setting can screw up existing workflow. But was it working well in the first place?  For those whose business falls apart post-EMR, I’d argue “no.”  Businesses that don’t do well after an install had jury-rigged processes in place already, I’d argue.

* Patient care slowing down:  As with staff workflow, clinical workflow can be discombobulated — badly — by an EMR installation. Learning to fit practice patterns to the system is a big job for most clinicians, and they may slow down significantly for a while. But if the patient care flow stays “broken” it’s likely that there were aspects of the pre-EMR system that didn’t work.

I realize that I might get flamed for saying this, but I’m pretty confident that a goodly number of problems that are laid at the feet of dysfunctional EMRs don’t belong there.  And that’s not a good thing.

After all, there are enough poorly designed, trouble-ridden EMRs out there to keep us busy critiquing them for a century or two.  Why distract ourselves by adding more to the pile when the real issues may be elsewhere?

Redesigning The Patient Medical Record, the Healthcare Challenge’s Results

Posted on January 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest post by Carl Bergman from EHR Selector.

The Obama administration’s, Challenge.gov site encourages the public to submit suggestions that solve specific, public policy questions. To do this, it’s set up dozens of contests or challenges. For example, the FTC has a $50,00 challenge for a solution to illegal robo calls that often come from off shore.

In healthcare, the VA and the ONC recently ran a Health Design Challenge for a better patient health record announcing the winners a few days ago.

The challenge asked for a record that:

  • Improves the visual layout and style of the information from the medical record
  • Makes it easier for a patient to manage his/her health
  • Enables a medical professional to digest information more efficiently
  • Aids a caregiver such as a family member or friend in his/her duties and responsibilities with respect to the patient

The entries were judged by a twelve person panel ranging from Wired Magazine’s Executive Editor, Thomas Goetz to Facebook’s Product Designer, Nicholas Felton to Dr. Sophia Chang, the director of the Chronic Disease Care program of the California Health Care Foundation. They looked at several features of a revamped record from overall appeal to how readily it shows important information and how accessible it is for physicians, patients, etc.

The Winners

The judges picked three big winners and three winners in the Problem History, Medication and Lab Summaries areas. Here’s a brief look at the top entries, but the submissions should be looked at more as a resource than a race result, as I’ll discuss.
Nightingale
First place went to Nightingale an anonymous group that won $16,000. Others won smaller amounts. In the next few months, elements of the winning designs will be put together and put up on Github.

Nightingale’s design stressed that health was a continuing concern and that a user should be able to see an improving or declining trend without having to dig for the data. They did this by integrating the often disparate information in visits, exams and lab results. You can see this emphasis in their lipid panel screen. Sliders place each test result for each test’s in a range. Good results slide to green while poorer result move to red.
StudioTACK
Second place StudioTACK took a somewhat similar approach to creating a problem history, which they call a medical strategy rather than a record. They did this by bringing their findings into a body map with references to location and organ.

Matthew Sanders’ CCD scored the best Problem History section award. Sanders rearranged and redesigned the traditional note not by condition nor by past chronology, but into a timeline of past, present and future actions. While he admits that his approach is somewhat redundant for meds, he emphasizes that this arrangement helps all the users maintain a focus on the most important areas for action. Sanders presentation notably describes how he implemented his approach. To do this, he stripped out standard label text, clarified terms and gave the remaining items visual emphasis. This type of analysis makes going through the submissions worth it.
Sanders CCD
This isn’t to say that the way the contest was run and the approach of many submissions  — including some prize winners — were without shortcomings. There were some notable problems.

The Contest’s Problems

The contest’s operators needed to be far more specific about what they wanted and how they judged the results.

The challenge’s purpose was far from clear:

The purpose of this effort is to improve the design of the medical record so it is more usable by and meaningful to patients, their families, and others who take care of them. This is an opportunity to take the plain-text Blue Button file and enrich it with visuals and a better layout. Innovators will be invited to submit their best designs for a medical record that can be printed and viewed digitally.

A medical record is an on going repository of a person’s health context, status, prognosis, plans, etc. It has many contributors and users. The VA’s Blue Button is a snapshot of the person’s status for their use. However, the contest uses these terms interchangeably. Due to this muddle, many of the submissions sent in designs for a medical record, while others, a minority, only redid the Blue Button’s outline. Thus, not all submissions were developed on the same basis. Indeed, the judges seem to acknowledge this since they gave first place to Nightingale, which claims, “to be a new take on health records.” The contest would have done much better if it asked for particular types of screens putting everyone on the same page, as it were.

The contest judging panel while distinguished, had no practicing physicians, nurses or practice managers, a significant failing. While three of the twelve judges are MDs, not one is a practicing physician.

Finally, if you’re going to hand out $50,000 in public funds, you might just want to say why you thought the winners stood out.

The Submissions

The contestants almost universally got one thing right. They designed their entries for desktops/laptops, pads and phones. They showed a great understanding that we don’t work on just one platform, but move from one to the other almost continuously. In this, they deserve much praise. However, all this cross platform awareness is done in by an appalling over, under and misuse of font color, and size. As one post noted about Nightingale:

The text is too small and medium gray on light gray is very hard to see, especially for older people and people on cheap computers with low contrast displays. How can this possibly be the first place winner?

The comment is generous. Nightingale’s gray on gray font is almost unreadable. Granted their submission is a PDF of a prototype, nonetheless the possibility of staring at their screens all day would give me a headache.

They are not alone in color misuse. Second place winner, Studio TACK, goes to excess the other way with a white text on red iPhone screen. It’s more suited to public safety than health.
StudioTack Mobile
Going through the submissions, however, can be most rewarding. I found a gem of a summary page in Uncorkit’s submission. Their infographic approach puts not only labs and weight history on timelines, but also includes BP, conditions and meds. It gives you a great overview and a logical place to drive down for detail information without overwhelming your senses.

The Health Challenge submissions have much to recommend them. Just remember how they came about and what they may or may not include.
Uncorkit

Is The Microsoft Surface Perfect For Hospitals?

Posted on I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

It’s no secret that there are a few tablets that rule the tablet world. There’s the iPad, obviously, and then the Samsung Galaxy 2, and even the Google Nexus 7. And most of these tablets run with either the iOS or Android. Since many apps that physicians are probably using run with one of these two systems,

However, Microsoft’s attempt to jump into the tablet marketplace might just be a game-changer, and app developers may want to consider it. With the announcement that the Surface, the tablet created by Microsoft, will be shipping out with the new Windows 8 OS. And according to HIStalk Mobile, this might be the perfect tablet for hospitals. Here are a few of the reasons listed:

  • Microsoft is the first company to offer a tablet and laptop that have identical operating systems.  This will “reduce the learning curve, and thus the productivity loss, of a first-time tablet user.”
  • The Surface will be able to run Windows 8 Pro, which means it has the capability of running PC-based software without Citrix or VMware connection. This is the first tablet that can do this, so EMR software, barcode scanner drivers, and more can be used directly from the tablet.

I’ll admit, when my husband and I were looking at tablets a few weeks ago, we were very tempted by the Surface, but decided against it, mainly because of the lack of apps available. The article points out that this may not be the tablet “end-users would pick for themselves,” which I agree with. However, because of all the features, and its capability run EMR software, I think it’s definitely going to be a big competitor for physicians and hospitals to use. I’d love to see more apps for patients to be developed for it as well. I think that when that starts happening, Microsoft will really have secured a permanent spot in the tablet marketplace, especially for people wanting to use it for health-related purposes.

It will be interesting to see if it is as successful as anticipated with hospitals. I think for those that may not have gotten tablets because they are nervous about trying out the iOS or Android systems, it will be a tempting offering, especially if they already know and understand Microsoft.

Telemedicine, Accenture, and Influenza App – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on January 27, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and EHR

When The EMR *Is* The Problem

Anne Zieger talks about a recent experience at the doctor’s office that took more time than it needed to because of an EMR. While EMRs are meant to increase efficiency and workflow, it isn’t always the case. How can these problems be addressed?

New Telemedicine Starts Bode Well For EMRs

Jennifer Dennard interviewed Sande Olson, a senior health consultant at Olson & Associates about the future of telemedicine technology. She discusses how it has changed recently, a possible trick down effect from the ACA, and integration of telemedicine into EMRs.

Hospital EMR and EHR

What Hospitals Can Learn From Hospitals

Airports are crowded, filled with germs, and just frustrating sometimes. However, there are a few things, technology-wise, that airports do well with, and hospitals should pay attention to. This post talks about three different things hospitals can learn from airports, including having kiosks and big screen displays.

Accenture: Five Questions Hospital Boards Should Ask Before EMR Buys

A study done by Accenture found that about four percent of hospitals will be making an EMR purchase in the next year. Partly because of this, Accenture has compiled a list of questions that should be asked before purchasing an EMR.  They suggest having these questions answered by an independent analysis of EMR vendors.

Smart Phone Healthcare 

CDC Release Influenza App

The CDC has released another app. This time, it focuses on the flu. Because this year’s flu season has run rampant throughout the United States, this app can be very helpful, particularly for physicians. It contains information concerning where outbreaks are happening, the vaccine, and tips on how to stay healthy.

The Next Generation of Doctors – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

The theme for today’s chat was “The Next Generation of Doctors.” When I read this, I wasn’t sure what to expect. It definitely sounded like an interesting topic, and it proved to be one. Here are the questions that were asked, and some of my favorite responses:

Topic One: Who are the emerging leaders you admire for their ideas in shaping the future of medicine? Why? Share resources!

 

 

 

Topic Two: Do you think new ways of learning will attract different types of personalities to the field of medicine?

 

 

Topic Three: How can the next generation of doctors learn from patients who are active through social media?

 

 

 

Topic Four: What does the next generation of doctors think of Quantified Self? How will the role of hte docotr change because of #OS?

 

Topic Five: What is your big idea or dream for the future of medicine.

 

Eric Topol and AliveCor on NBC’s Rock Center

Posted on January 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last night, digital health finally went mainstream. The ever popular Eric Topol was featured on NBC’s Rock Center. It’s great that more people will learn about what’s happening in Digital Healthcare. I particularly like near the end of the video Dr. Topol talks about the need for patients to be more involved in their health. Plus, it was fun to see the AliveCor device in action on network television. I’ve embedded the full video of Eric Topol on Rock Center below.

Using Influencers to Differentiate Your Health IT Products

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Shahid Shah and I have been working together for the past little while on a new company called Influential Networks. It’s been a really amazing experience for me to work alongside Shahid and to learn from his amazing expertise.

As HIMSS fast approaches, Shahid and I decided that it would be helpful for us to share some tips and tricks to improve a company’s marketing and messaging strategy and how they can use influencers in that strategy. We’ll be hosting a webinar on Tuesday, January 29th at 2:00pm EST to share these tips. The tips we will be sharing apply at HIMSS or to any company looking to differentiate their product or service in the healthcare market.

For those who don’t want to wait or can’t attend on Tuesday, last Thursday we teamed up with HIMSS Social Media gurus, Cari McLean and Michael Gaspar, to do a similar webinar focused on differentiating your product and services at HIMSS. You can download a recording of that webinar here.

Much of the content in the webinar on Tuesday will be similar to the one we did with HIMSS, but with a few different twists. Plus, we’ll save time for Q&A at the end of the event where you can get your company specific questions answered. Here’s a short outline of the major subjects we’ll cover:

  • Describe the expectations of attendees and why they attend
  • Provide suggestions for how to clearly differentiate your products and services
  • Explain some of the common mistakes exhibitors make
  • Plan what to do before, during, and after the conference

You can register for the Tuesday webinar online. Everyone is welcome to attend.

If you have any specific questions you’d like to make sure we answer at the webinar, feel free to leave a comment below and we’ll be sure to answer them for you.