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Dragon Naturally Speaking Preferred Versus Medical

Posted on February 13, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve always been a little bit skeptical about paying the $1000+ for the medical version of Dragon Naturally Speaking. $1000 just seems like a lot of money to be paying for what seems to amount to some medical dictionaries. However, someone who is very familiar with nuance and Dragon Naturally Speaking told me that doctors should really purchase the DNS Medical or they’ll end up dissatisfied.

Well, today I was reading the forum on Amazon for Dragon Naturally Speaking which asks if the medical version is worth it for doctors. The responses generally weren’t worth while, but someone who calls themselves “Pain Doc” suggested the following:

I have used DNS for about 7 years. I started with version 6 as I recall. I had my transcriptionist email me the text files from all my dictations for several years and then I “fed” those to DNS to learn the vocabulary. I then had a very serviceable medical DNS for my practice and an unemployed transcriptionist.

What a genius idea for anyone that’s currently doing transcription. A great way to save about $1000 on software.

Check out the following prices for the various versions of DNS on Amazon:
UPDATE: Dragon NaturallySpeaking Premium 12 is out now.
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 10 Preferred – Currently $151.49 with $50 rebate ($101.49 after rebate)
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9 Preferred – Currently $92.97
I’m still looking around for the best location to buy Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical.

Interestingly, this same person quote above also said, “I also upgraded to DNS 10.0 which is a total POS. I am back to 9.0 and wouldn’t recommend 10.0 to anyone.” I’d love to hear more people’s comments on this subject.

When a SAAS EHR Software Goes Belly Up

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently posted my belief that the EMR and EHR industry is about to shrink. This can happen in a number of ways, but will most often happen through either a merger or a company just closing its doors.

There are definite challenges associated when your EMR or EHR company gets merged into another company. I’ll save those discussions for a future post (or would welcome a guest blogger to write about their experience with it), but in this post I just wanted to raise awareness about what could happen if the company hosting your SAAS EHR goes belly up.

When selecting an SAAS EHR, it is important to learn how the EHR company is funded. Depending on how your company is funded will give you a good idea of how long they’ll be around. A company that is running off of venture capital funding or new sales could run into real troubles in this current economic crisis. Once an EHR company runs out of money they’ll generally have the choices listed above: sale/merge the company and assets or shut down the company. Of course, an EHR company that is structured to survive on reoccurring revenue is in a much stronger position financially and will weather the economic crisis better.  In a future post I’ll discuss some warning flags that might indicate that your EHR company is in trouble.

Imagine what effect it would have on your clinic if your hosted SAAS EHR were to close their doors.  An EHR becomes as integral to a practice as breathing.  You can only hold your breathe so long before you start experiencing some major consequences.  Have you thought about a plan in case this happens to your EHR company?  Do you even have the rights to the data in your SAAS EHR company?  What would you do with that data if God forbid, the company was going to shut down?

The good news is that I believe most SAAS EHR companies will try to give you at least some notice before shutting down the company.  However, you shouldn’t expect more than a month’s notice.  If a company is shutting its doors, then every month their in business their losing more and more money.  So, you better be prepared with a plan of what you’ll do in the event this happens.

Unfortunately, mergers or sales aren’t that much better than a company shutting down.  Depends on the merger or sale, but often the software from the company being purchased goes from being highly developed to mostly maintained.  Help requests will often go unanswered or at least a delayed response while the companies figure out the best way to merge the two companies.

Planning for this even is even more serious when using a SAAS EHR software.  In a hosted EHR situation, even if the company goes under you can still use the EHR for as long as you want.  You just won’t get support if something goes wrong with the software.  This gives you a longer runway to be able to plan the move to another EHR system.  An SAAS EHR software has a much shorter runway to make a change.

I wish these things weren’t a reality.  It would be nice to think that every EHR company is going to do great and be around forever.  However, it’s just not the case.  EHR companies of any sort are still a software company.  In fact, many are startup software companies and the statistics don’t lie that the majority of software startup companies fail.  Are you prepared in case your EHR company fails?