Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

EMR and EHR Implementation

Posted on January 11, 2006 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I ran accross an interesting study which says that EHR won’t penetrate into the small office segment(which is the largest segment) until the year 2024 which is 10 years after when policy makers have asked it to be implemented. The study used actual data to make this prediction which is a step in the right direction. This is good and bad news for EMR vendors that now have nearly 20 years of business ahead of them but that means revenues will be strung out over 20 years. No dotcom boom at that rate.

EMR Companies Galore!!

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the NY Sun it was reported that there are around 1,200 companies doing EMR today. That is a lot of companies and a lot of choices. No wonder picking a company is so difficult. Unfortunately EMR programs aren’t like CD burning software which is similar enough to not matter that much. Not to mention you can switch if you don’t like it. They are way to complex and I’ll be quite honest that if someone asked my to convert my current EMR to a new one I would probably quit my job first. It’s just so complex.

Here’s is some good information to help those starting to evaluate all the different EMR companies.

There are many free software out there to choose from. You can find a good list here. Just remember that just because the software is free, supporting it isn’t free and often requires certain expertise and don’t forget about paying for any customizations you may require. It’s still definitely worth looking at.

Second, my friends at emrupdate.com and more specifically Naveen of DoctorsPartner have created a price matrix that includes a good number of EMR and their pricing. That should help you narrow down those companies that aren’t close to your budget.

Possible Government “Breakthrough” EMR Technologies

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There was a pretty good article recently in the NY Sun Times about plans to push EMR by government. While it still gave no specific plans here’s an excerpt of a few possible things:

“Dr. Brailer told the Sun that later this month the administration will start by unveiling “breakthrough” health information technology initiatives that may be completed by year’s end, increasing the issue’s visibility among the American public. The initiatives include nationwide computerized personal medication histories, so that a doctor anywhere in the country can know what medications a patient is taking before treating him; providing “secure messaging” to allow for private e-mail and other electronic correspondence directly between doctors and patients, and “bio surveillance,” which uses computerized records to monitor disease outbreaks and provide earlier detection and better treatment of pandemics or bioterrorism attacks.”

I thought the article was good because it gave some interesting statistics about EMR and tried to quantify cost savings and expenses. The above “breakthrough” technologies it said would only cost $100 million to $200 million dollars. I guess the reality is that the technologies cost much less, but it might take $100-200 million dollars to cut through the red tape.

More Pluses for EMR

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think one topic that has gotten a lot of coverage in regards to EMR is its ability to prevent medical errors. I read an article from the NY Sun that said, “between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans die each year from medical errors.” I think the argument of lives is a hard one to quantify because I think we’d all agree that even one life saved is worth it. The real question lies in our ability to quantify whether lives were saved because of EMR or not. That’s very difficult and I expect over the next couple years there will be studies done showing how many people lost lives because of EMR’s. Just a hunch.

I think the thought of saving lives is great, but I think there could be a related issue in regards to extending people’s lives and improving their quality of life. EHR has the serious potential to be able to do many of these things by giving patients better information on how to manage their health. What about adding excercise and other health education topics to an EHR in order to promote the well being of your patients. This could all be done electronically and encouraged by the doctor.

One other idea that was raised in the article linked above was, “The federal government estimates that nationwide electronic health records would save the health care industry $140 billion a year.” The real question is who is going to take that money home, the insurance companies, the doctors or the patient? In reality, in order to have those savings it is going to cost to implement the EMR and so in the short term no one is going to save. Eventually I can see EMR saving patients money or more importantly slow the ever rising cost of healthcare.