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Hospitals Still Lagging On Mobile

Posted on January 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

One would think that these days, when the desktop computer is an extension of mobile devices rather than the other way around, hospitals would have well-defined, mature plans in place for managing mobile technology. But according to one survey, that’s definitely not the case.

In a study sponsored by Spok, which provides clinical communication services, many healthcare providers are still in the early years of developing a mobile strategy.

The study, which drew on contacts with more than 300 healthcare professionals in the US, found that 21% had had a mobile strategy in place for less than one year, 40% for one to three years,14% for 3 to 5 years and 25% for more than five years. In other words, while one-quarter of organizations had settled in and developed a mobile approach, an almost equal amount were just getting their feet wet.

Not only that, many of those who do have a mobile strategy in place may be shooting from the hip. While 65% of those surveyed had a documented mobility strategy in place, 35% didn’t.

That being said, it seems that organizations that have engaged with mobile are working hard to tweak their strategy regularly. According to Spok, their reasons for updating the strategy include:

* Shifting mobile needs of end-users (44%)
* The availability of new mobile devices (35%)
* New capabilities from the EHR vendor (26%)
* Changes in goals of mobile strategy (23%)
* Challenges in implementing the strategy (21%)
* Changes in hospital leadership (16%)

(Seven percent said their mobile strategy had not changed since inception, and 23% weren’t sure what changes had been made.)

Nonetheless, other data suggest there has been little progress in integrating mobile strategy with broader hospital goals.

For example, while 53% wanted to improve physician-to-physician communications, only 19% had integrated mobile strategy with this goal. Fifty-three percent saw nurse-to-physician communications as a key goal, but only 18% had integrated this goal with their mobile plans. The gaps between other top strategies and integration with mobile plans were similar across the strategic spectrum.

Ultimately, it’s likely that it will take a team approach to bring these objectives together, but that’s not happening in the near future. According to respondents, the IT department will implement mobile in 82% of institutions surveyed, 60% clinical leadership, 37% doctors, 34% telecom department, 27% nurses and 22% outside help from consultants and vendors. (Another 16% didn’t plan to have a dedicated team in place.)

The whole picture suggests that while the hospital industry is gradually moving towards integrating mobile into its long-term thinking, it has a ways to go. Given the potential benefits of smart mobile use, let’s hope providers catch up quickly.

How is Society’s Drive for Everything “On Demand” Changing Healthcare? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/19 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Darin Vander Well (@DarinVanderWell) from @docutap on the topic of “How is Society’s Drive for Everything “On Demand” Changing Healthcare?

Netflix, Amazon, Uber, DVR, smart watches, smart homes – Today’s devices, apps, and technologies are making nearly every facet of our lives available in an instant. One industry that has resisted full-scale turnover into an on-demand delivery model has been healthcare.

Whether unwilling or unable, there are many pieces of the healthcare ecosystem that – albeit, with technology – are delivered on the same timelines that have always been used.

However, we are beginning to see some change. Urgent care and retail clinics, telemedicine, and even a return to house calls are helping to usher in the move, but who’s next in healthcare’s push towards on demand? And who should push back?

Join the conversation during this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are some ways you’ve already seen healthcare moving toward an on-demand model? #HITsm

T2: Regardless of current adoption, which segments of healthcare make the most sense to deliver on-demand? Which make the least sense? #HITsm

T3: How will the delivery of more healthcare on demand affect patient experience and expectations? #HITsm

T4: How does delivery of healthcare on demand affect population health? #HITsm

T5: How can healthcare organizations begin to change their mindset to deliver (more) healthcare on demand? #HITsm

Bonus: As the on demand healthcare landscape expands, what types of services (HCIT and beyond) do you expect to evolve alongside it? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
1/26 – Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft

2/2 – TBD

2/9 – TBD

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management

Posted on January 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

Half of all U.S. adults, roughly 117 million people, have one or more chronic health conditions. 1 in 4 people have two or more chronic conditions. As a nation, we need some help addressing the chronic disease epidemic. Many patient portals today give patients access to pieces of their health information – lab results, for example – and some will flag upcoming appointments or refill a prescription, but where are the tools and the data in a portal to actually help patients manage chronic conditions, thereby improving their overall health and wellness? Sadly, many patient portals provide a very narrow view, with few opportunities to link data to actions to results in a way that closes the loop between patients and caregivers. Without a complete view of a patient’s health measures, wellness goals, and plans of action – and the tools to manage them – it is very difficult to connect health and wellness to address the whole patient.

Chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record to link both wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What does it take to improve and maintain wellness? First, you need patient engagement. You need motivated patients who want to do a good job of actively tracking their conditions and working toward wellness goals. How do you convince a chronically ill patient to do this? Start by offering a tool that’s easy for them to track their data – complete with a workflow and user interface that makes it a breeze to enter and distill information at a glance and when they are on the go. Use technology similar to what patients use in their daily lives on their smart phones and laptops. Give patients tools to understand their health and take action based on how they are doing and what their health goals are! Provide a portal that allows the integration of popular wearable devices and lets the patient decide who should have access (Spouses? Caregivers?) to help them enter and manage their information.

Effectively managing chronic disease requires changing poor habits and forming good habits. Sometimes people need a gentle nudge or a push outside of the exam room. A platform that can send out reminders, gamify the experience, and even call a patient can go a long way in helping steer chronic disease patients in a more positive wellness direction. It’s not all about reminders, either. Texts and calls informing patients when they are doing a good job managing their daily wellness habits can also help.

Beyond helping patients, there’s an added benefit to coupling wellness capabilities with a PHR for providers – it has the ability to not only affect chronic disease factors, but to collect the data providers need to participate in the Quality Payment Program; the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). To quickly review, the Quality Payment Program allows clinicians to be rewarded financially for providing high-quality and high value care through Advanced Alternate Payment Models (APMs) or MIPS that are based on various measures. These measures can be integrated into the PHR, allowing physicians to track their patient populations, run reports, submit information to the Quality Payment Program, and receive merit payments.

What are your thoughts? Would you use a PHR to manage a chronic condition you are experiencing? Would you encourage your loved ones to use one? As a provider, how do you feel about a PHR making it easier for you to track MIPS/MACRA measures?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Value of Service – Martin Luther King Day

Posted on January 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today in the US, we’re celebrating the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. To celebrate the holiday, I thought it would be great to share some of Martin Luther King Jr.’s quotes. Many of the messages are relevant to the healthcare and illustrate what makes those working in healthcare so special.

Change Healthcare Launch Raises Questions About Blockchain Scalability

Posted on January 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Healthcare technology vendor Change Healthcare has introduced a blockchain-based network focused on managing claims. Change says its Intelligent Healthcare Network is the first enterprise-scale blockchain network in healthcare.

According to the vendor, using technology will let organizations track the status of claims submission and remittance across the claims lifecycle accurately. It also contends that by using blocking technology in Intelligent Healthcare Network, companies will have a greater ability to audit trace and trust those involved in transactions.

To build out its blockchain infrastructure, Change Healthcare used Hyperledger Fabric 1.0, an open source blockchain framework hosted by The Linux Foundation.

Within the release, the company predicts that blockchain technology could ultimately offer providers a single viewpoint for accurately tracking the complete patient healthcare encounter, starting, say, when an individual arrives for a preoperative visit to the procedure care received, then later billing and payment.

All of that is well and good, but the following is more noteworthy.

In its statement, Change says its Intelligent Healthcare Network already processes more than 50 million claims and up to 550 transactions per second. It says that the capacity and speed of its network already exceeds the daily national transaction load, and that its network can scale as blockchain technology use grows.

Still, Change tells us that it will be building out its apparently massive network infrastructure “as the solution is further optimized and scaled to address demand.”  This suggests that Change may know something that we don’t about blockchain implementation. It’s not entirely clear, but I think the vendor thinks that its blockchain solution will generate significant network overhead, enough that even with its huge existing capacity, and eventually won’t be able to keep up with blockchain demands as is.

So that brings us to the real issue buried in this release. If Change needs to build out its super-high-capacity network as its blockchain customer base grows, it suggests to me that enterprise blockchain may not scale effectively overall at present.

If there is a scalability issue with Change’s blockchain service, there could be a number of reasons why. For example, it could be related to some idiosyncrasy within the company’s network architecture. Another guess is that Change is already having throughput problems it doesn’t want to discuss, and that blockchain is just adding insult to injury.

Still, one has to wonder whether the problems are inherent to blockchain itself. As far as I know, we don’t yet have much information on how blockchain solutions like Hyperledger perform in an enterprise environment. Perhaps we’ll learn something about this by keeping an eye on Change’s launch.

Why Clinicians Need a 2015 Certified EHR

Posted on January 11, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

What does “2015 Certified EHR” mean to practicing clinicians? The once-flooded EHR market is now whittling down to those vendors equipped to respond to regulatory and industry changes. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology listed more than 4,000 EHRs with 2014 certification criteria, according to the most recent data from healthIT.gov. And to date, only about 200 EHRs have passed the rigorous 2015 certification criteria.

However, beyond the fact that 2015 is indeed the most recent certification criteria as issued by the HHS, why should medical practices care?  

When vendors certify their EHRs, physicians—and patients—are ultimately the beneficiaries, says Beth Onofri, EHR and industry advisor at Kareo, who led the 2015 Certification process for the Kareo Clinical EHR. Physicians benefit because the technology allows them to easily attest that they’ve met quality requirements specified in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). This includes Advancing Care Information (ACI)-related measures that help physicians boost their payments. ACI accounts for 25 percent of a physician’s performance score that dictates reimbursement under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Patients benefit because they’re able to access and exchange their own health information more easily than ever before. It’s a win-win all around, says Onofri.

“The 2015 criteria require functionality supporting unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.”
—Beth Onofri, EHR and Industry Advisor at Kareo

Although using a certified EHR is important, implementing one that’s certified using only the 2015 criteria (not the 2014 criteria or a combination of the two) is a critical piece of the puzzle under MACRA, says Onofri. EHRs certified with the 2015 criteria help pave the way for physicians to receive a bonus in 2018. In addition, the 2015 criteria require functionality that supports unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.

Still, many physicians aren’t aware of how the 2015 certification criteria can help their practices, says Onofri.

Of the 60 different 2015 certification criteria, Onofri says these five are particularly helpful for practices seeking to improve the quality of the care they provide, ultimately fostering accurate payments under value-based payment reform:

1. View, download, and transmit health information to a third party

The 2015 criteria require a secure method of access (usually through a patient portal) as well as the ability to send information to an unsecured email address of the patient’s choice, says Onofri. The idea is that offering various access options improves overall patient engagement and outcomes.

She suggests creating a brochure that explains to patients how they can access and use the portal, including how to view, download, and transmit their health information. Another idea is to recruit a volunteer who can show patients how to use the portal while they wait in the waiting area. “There needs to be a strong advocate in each practice to make sure that these functionalities are implemented and used,” she adds. “Those practices with an advocate are the ones that will succeed.”

2. Secure messaging

This functionality allows physicians to send messages to—and receive messages from—patients in a secure manner, helping to improve engagement and communication. Practices must define how they’ll use secure messaging, including who will respond and what types of questions they’ll permit (e.g., fulfill appointment requests vs. answering clinical inquiries). “There are a small percentage of doctors who will want to answer their own messages, but there is a larger percentage of doctors who will want their staff to answer the emails and, if necessary, escalate to the provider,” says Onofri.

3. Patient health information capture

This functionality allows physicians to accept patient-generated health data into the EHR. For example, Onofri notes that the Kareo Clinical 2015 Edition EHR allows patients to record their health information at home to easily upload the information to their portal and transmit it securely to the physician for shared decision-making. The idea is that access to more comprehensive health data can help physicians prevent and manage disease—and it could be a game-changer in terms of population health management.

Start small when rolling out this functionality, she says. For instance, encourage patients with high blood pressure to upload their blood readings daily before engaging a second population (e.g., those with diabetes who upload their glucose levels).

4. Transitions of care

This functionality calls for interoperable documents that include key health data (e.g., name, date of birth, and medications) as well as standardized format for exchange. A transition of care summary provides critical information as patients transfer between different physicians at different health organizations or even distinct levels of care within the same organization.

“It’s not uncommon for our providers to send the referral right as they are completing the note with the patient in the room,” says Onofri. “This obviously speeds the care coordination for patients in terms of seeing another doctor.” The only caveat is that practices must compile a list of direct email addresses for physicians to whom patients are frequently referred, she adds.

5. Application programming interfaces (APIs)

“This is one of those requirements that is the foundation of things to come,” says Onofri. “It’s the first step toward interoperability.” API functionality will eventually allow patients to aggregate data from multiple sources in a web or mobile application of their choice.

Physicians who take the time to explore each of these 2015 certification functionalities may be more likely to improve outcomes and reap financial rewards under MACRA, says Onofri. “The improved functionality is there—is your practice taking advantage of it?”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Doctors, Data, Diagnoses, and Discussions: Achieving Successful and Sustainable Personalized/Precision Medicine

Posted on January 10, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Drew Furst, M.D., Vice President Clinical Consultants at Elsevier Clinical Solutions.

Personalized/precision medicine is a growing field and that trend shows no sign of slowing down.

In fact, a 2016 Grand View Research report estimated the global personalized medicine market was worth $1,007.88 billion in 2014, with projected growth to reach $2,452.50 billion by 2022.

As these areas of medicine become more commonplace, understanding the interactions between biological factors with a range of personal, environmental and social impacts on health is a vital step towards achieving sustainable success.

A better understanding begins with answering important questions such as whether the focus should be precision population medicine (based on disease) or precision patient-specific medicine (based on the individual).

Specificity in terminology is needed. The traditional term of “personalized medicine” has evolved into the term “precision medicine,” but this new usage requires a more detailed look into the precise science of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors that influence any approach to treatment.

Comprehending the interactions between biological factors with a range of personal, environmental, and social impacts on health can provide insights into success and we’ve learned that some areas of precision medicine are more effective than others.

Through pharmacogenomics – the study of understanding how a patient’s genetic make-up affects the response to a particular drug – we have identified key enzymes in cancer formation and cancer treatment, which aids in the customization of drugs.

Research shows us that drug-metabolizing enzyme activity is one of many factors that impact a patient’s response to medication. We also know that human cytochrome P450 (CYP) plays an important role in the metabolism of drugs and environmental chemicals.

Therapies that incorporate drug-specific pharmacogenomics are a boon to oncology treatments and a vast improvement over the “shotgun therapy” approach of the past. Today, treatments can be targeted to enzymes and receptors that vary from person to person.

In traditional chemotherapy, a drug developed to kill rapidly growing cancer cells will indiscriminately target other rapidly growing cells such as hair cells, hence the often-observed hair loss. However, a targeted drug and delivery method aimed at only the receptive cells can be a much more effective approach and treatment, while minimizing collateral damage.

Recently, the journal Nature published a study showing the promise this method holds.  In the pilot study, scientists led by Dr. Catherine Wu of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston gave six melanoma patients an experimental, custom-made vaccine and, two years later, all were tumor-free following treatment.

Looking Beyond Genetics

Precision medicine needs to include more than just genetics.

Factors such as environment and socio-economic status also must be included when approaching disease states and we must undertake a comprehensive overview of a patient’s situation, including, but not limited to, family history.

Cultural dietary traditions can play into disease susceptibility. As an example, the frequent consumption of smoked fish in some Asian cultures increases their risk of gastric (stomach) cancers. Lower socioeconomic status can force acceptance of substandard and overcrowded housing with increased risk of illness ranging from lead toxicity, asbestosis, and Hantavirus to name a just a few.

A patient with a genetic propensity for lung cancer who also smokes cigarettes and has high radon levels in their home is increasing the odds of developing disease due to these combined genetic, behavioral, and environmental factors.

Patient-derived Data and the Diagnosis

In addition to the information now available through state-of-the-art medical testing, patient-derived information from wearables, biometrics, and direct-to-consumer health testing kits, presents patients and physicians alike with new opportunities and challenges.

Armed with newly discovered health data, patients may present it to their doctors with a request that it be included in their health record. Many patients expect an interpretation of that data when they visit their doctor and an explanation of what it means for their present (and future) healthcare.

Doctors can be overwhelmed when unfiltered information is thrown at them. Doctors are not prepared and research has yet to offer definitive support for interpretation of patient-derived data.

Studying hereditary traits can offer some insights from generation to generation. By delving into genomics of individual patients, we get a clearer picture into a person’s risk factor for a certain disease, but often this information provides no immediate solutions. Discovering a genetic indicator for Alzheimer’s, may reflect a higher propensity for the disease, but symptoms may be decades away, if they appear at all.

Pitfalls and Possibilities

There are many concerns about genomic data collection, one of which is whether policies can keep pace with patient privacy and the related ethical questions that inevitably ensue. These questions are consistently surfacing and there is no clear direction on the best course of action.

Clearer policies are needed to delineate who has access to a patient’s genetic records and whether third parties, such as health or life insurance companies, can deny coverage or care based on genomics.

In addition, one cannot ignore the psychological burden associated with knowing your “potential” for a disease, based solely on your genetic testing, when it may never come to fruition. Not to mention, its effect on planning for one’s future decisions relative to career, residence, and relationship commitments.

Even some physicians are reticent to undergo genetic testing for fear of who might gain access to the information and the consequences thereof.

Physicians face an additional conundrum in dealing with patient-supplied information: How to counsel patients when, in some cases, the task should be the responsibility of a community resources representative? In addition, patients who request that certain information not be included in their personal health record, present a problem for a physician justifying a test or a procedure to a payer.

The consumerization of healthcare and patient engagement strategies employed to deliver better outcomes are driving the healthcare industry to open conversations that elevate the level of care delivered to patients. In addition, physicians need to demand more direction and initiate more discussions on how to deal with the opportunities and challenges presented in the era of patient-derived and pharmacogenomics data.

While improving patient-physician communication should always be a priority, discussing how and when to use genetic and patient-derived information is still a work in progress.

Dr. Furst is Vice President Clinical Consultants at Elsevier Clinical Solutions.

Driving Innovation in Healthcare Forward Requires New Ways of Thinking – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/12 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Constance Sjoquist (@CASjoquist), Chief Content Officer at HLTH.co on the topic of “Driving Innovation in Healthcare Forward Requires New Ways of Thinking.”

Traditional channels for ideating, learning, and sharing ideas, products and services that can improve healthcare outcomes, lower costs and make it easier on everyone involved are changing. Health plan members, budding consumers, both new and long-time patients, sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies and start-ups and investors all have a vested interest. Not to mention the various federal and state-level government agencies that regulate all of these constituents.

So how can all of us – ALL OF US – work together to improve healthcare outcomes and lower costs – all while making it easier on all of us?

This chat raises and explores some ideas to help drive innovation in healthcare forward. We need new ways of thinking. Gigantic conferences and one-sided media movements are not cutting it.

Come join this exchange on how we can ALL participate and contribute in the drive to make healthcare more innovative.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are the primary reasons why the transformation of healthcare in the United States in 2018 and beyond is so difficult and challenging? #HITsm

T2: How can plan members, budding healthcare consumers, new & long-time patients, their sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies & start-ups – help to reduce healthcare costs while improving quality of care? #HITsm

T3: In what ways can healthcare conferences, forums and media – traditional and digital – help to drive innovation in the health industry? And help to reduce healthcare costs while improving quality of care? #HITsm

T4: In what specific ways can disruptive technologies like #AI, #BigData, #MachineLearning, AR/VR, #3DPrinting, #PrecisionMedicine, Mobile & #IoT drive & support transformation of #healthcare? #HITsm (How’s that for too many hashtags!)

T5: Where can plan members, #healthcare consumers, new & long-time patients, their sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies & start-ups look for examples of successful industry transformation? #HITsm

Bonus: What‘s one thing #healthcare conference organizers, the media that promote #healthcare & those that attend & support conferences help to move healthcare forward? What are they currently not doing? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
1/19 – How is society’s drive for everything “on demand” changing healthcare?
Hosted by Darin Vander Well (@DarinVanderWell) from @docutap

1/26 – Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft

2/2 – TBD

2/9 – TBD

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Is A Cerner Installation A “Downgrade” From Epic? Ask This Guy

Posted on January 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I don’t know if I’ve ever quoted a letter to the editor in a column for this publication, but I have to this time. I thought it had an interesting story to tell.

The letter, written by a patient at the Banner University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson, offers a scathing critique what he sees “degradation of services” taking place after the institution switched from an Epic to a Cerner EHR, a change he refers to as a downgrade throughout the letter.

Since the “downgrade,” said the patient, John Kimbell, appointments take much longer. “Three weeks after the downgrade, my 30-minute appointment took three hours and 40 minutes,” he complains.

His other concerns include:

  • Data exchange problems: “My local doctor has TWICE sent results of a scan to my oncologist, and they never arrived.”
  • Privacy issues: With the automated paging system gone, “nurses call out names in the waiting areas in each clinic,” Kimbell notes.
  • Useless information: After Kimbell’s most recent appointment, he says, he was “handed out a 13-page printout that gave 12 pages information I didn’t need.” Before the Epic to Cerner switch, he reports, he was able to access this information online.
  • Communication issues: Kimbell says he never gets telephone call reminders of appointments anymore.

As Kimbell sees it, the quality of care has slipped significantly since Epic was switched out for a Cerner system. “All the cancer patients I have known while a patient there are in need of better care than Banner now provides,” he writes.

It’s important to note here that the Epic-to-Cerner switch-off took place in October last year, which means that the tech and administrative staff haven’t had much time to work out problems with the new installation. It may be the case that the concerns Kimbell had in late December won’t be an issue in a couple of months.

On the other hand, I do think it’s possible that as the letter implies, UMC owner Banner Health may have had reasons to push the Cerner install into the facility, most particularly if all of its other properties already operate using Cerner.

Regardless, if everything is as Kimbell describes, let’s hope it all gets back in order soon.  From the looks of things, UMC seems to offer a renowned cancer treatment program. Let’s hope that a quality program isn’t undermined by IT concerns.

Cerner $10 Billion VA Contract Comes To Screeching Halt

Posted on January 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

After Cerner captured the massive multi billion dollar contract to roll out its EMR for the Department of Defense, everyone was a bit stunned, as many thought Epic was a lock for the job.

Cerner seems to have been conducting the rollout as promised, so there’s that. But when it comes to its performance in meeting the requirements of its $10 billion contract with the VA, things aren’t looking as good. Apparently, Cerner’s DoD implementation isn’t sharing data well with Cerner’s VA systems. Oops.

According to Politico, the Cerner contract with the VA is running into serious questions about its capacity for fluid data sharing. The VA’s Cerner rollout has been held up by questions about its ability to interoperate with the DoD system.

VA Secretary David Shulkin, who’s perhaps the biggest critic of Cerner’s efforts, had his agency issue a request for information looking for examples of data-sharing solutions. Shulkin is proposing that the VA conduct tests of the system’s capacity for interoperability, in which the department would send patients through the VA system and see whether it can share useful data with the VA along the way. If the test has a bad outcome, it’s likely to ramp up the tension considerably.

What makes all of this particularly embarrassing is that the VA awarded the contract to Cerner without conducting the usual bidding process, largely because the agency believed having its own Cerner implementation would make it easier to share data with the DoD. Good luck with that, folks.

I’m sure that key managers on the VA project are freaking out at this point.  The combined multi billion dollars the DoD and VA have entrusted Cerner with represents a massive commitment, and when a customer that size starts questioning whether they’ve made a good investment, the ground must have begun trembling under Cerner’s feet. Not to mention the consultants from Leidos, etc who are charged with delivering a massive chunk of the project.

It’s hard to imagine that Epic isn’t seeing if it can take advantage of the situation. While it may not have the ability to horn in on the contracts themselves, I’m sure that it’s making sure customers know about what’s happening, and using the news to suggest that Cerner doesn’t have its act together.

I don’t know what will happen if the VA continues to find fault with Cerner, but it can’t be pretty.