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Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture Win DoD EHR Project – $4.3 Billion

Posted on July 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

All the news at the end of the day yesterday was around Cerner (and their major partners Leidos, Accenture) winning the DoD EHR project. We’d been told the decision would come by the end of the month and you knew a decision was close once the major news organizations started writing about what a waste the DoD EHR project will be before they’d even named the winner. That’s called priming the pump. Of course, the critics make some good points about the DoD EHR project dealing with today instead of the future, and they also suggested that “We’re going to make Epic or Cerner the Standard Oil of health IT. It will become a monopoly at a time when we need to be moving to solutions that allow everyone to participate.”

I guess now that we know that Cerner has won the DoD contract, does that make them the Standard Oil of Health IT?

What we do know is that Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture were awarded the $4,336,822,777 (Our government’s so precise they got a 10 year project down to the dollar?) EHR contract with it projected to be around $9 billion over the life of the 10 year contract. That’s massive by any terms. It’s also much less than the projected $11 billion that was previously discussed. I guess competition for the DoD EHR contract brought the price down? Although, how often does the government project the costs for a project and then they balloon over the life of the project. According to Healthcare IT News, they’ll be working on bringing their first sites live in the Pacific Northwest by the end of 2016 and 1000 sites by 2022.

A lot of people have been commenting how this is a big win for Cerner and a big loss for Epic. Of course, I wrote a little over a year ago that the best thing for Epic might be to NOT win the DoD EHR contract. You can be sure that many hospital systems won’t be selecting Cerner now that they’re going to be tied up with the massive DoD EHR contract. Who does that leave? In most cases, that will leave Epic. I can’t help but wonder how many Soarian users will now decide to go to Epic instead of Cerner as well because of the Cerner win. Cerner should start working on this potential perception problem.

You can imagine the celebrations happening at the companies that won this contract. HIStalk posted a great image that shows all the partners that will be involved in the bid:
DoD EHR Partners

While they may be celebrating the contract now, it reminds me of startup companies who do big celebrations when they raise a round of funding. Those celebrations are premature since it’s really the start of all the hard work to come.

I personally lean more towards G Gordon Liddie’s comment on the HIStalk post on this subject:

Cerner will do as good a job as Epic would have done…which won’t be great. The federal government can’t pull off something like this.

I think this shares many people’s fears of a project this size. Others might suggest, if the government can’t roll out an insurance exchange website without major issues, how are they going to make an EHR roll out which is much more complex a success. I’m sure Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture will be thinking about this every day for the next 5-10 years.

Other DoD EHR Coverage:
Healthcare IT News
nextGov
HIStalk
MedCityNews

GAO Says Defense, VA Shouldn’t Have Separate EMRs

Posted on March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

The GAO isn’t satisfied with plans the departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs has submitted claiming that separate EMRs will be more affordable and quicker than their original joint plans.

The two agencies had claimed that implementing separate, interoperable EMR systems would be a better choice than developing a joint EMR usable by both agencies.  But the GAO says the two have not substantiated their claims that the separate EMRs would save money and time.

The GAO report comes after years of wrangling over how to create a joint, integrated EHR. The two agencies have been discussing creating the joint project, the iEHR, since 2009. The idea behind the iEHR was to allow every service member to maintain a single EHR throughout their career and lifetime.

However, the iEHR project came to a screeching halt in February 2013, when the two agencies announced plans to stop the project and focus instead on making their existing EHR systems more interoperable.

In follow-up, the House and Senate in December 2013 approved the funding bill that required to VA and DOD to create a plan for a single or interoperable electronic health record by January 31.

Since then the GAO has addressed the plans the two agencies made, and concluded that they have not:

  • Addressed management barriers to collaboration terms of enterprise architecture, IT investment management and other areas
  • Laid out what the interoperable EHR approach consists of, how much it will cost, or when and how it will be completed
  • Developed a joint healthcare architecture or investment management collaboration to guide the project
  • Updated their strategic plan to commit to an integrated approach

In the GAO’s view, the fact that the VA and DOD are taking separate approaches — the VA modernizing its system and the DOD acquiring a new commercially available system — is not going to work out well.