The Healthcare “Business” and Interoperability

Posted on December 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last month I started what I think is a really important conversation about interoperability. I asked the question, “Do Hospitals Want Interoperability?” Go ahead and read the article. We’ll be here when you get back.

In response to that article and that question, Thomas Lukasik offered the following commentary on a LinkedIn thread:

Imagine one car dealer asking another car dealer to send them all of the information that they have on a customer of theirs so that they can do a better job of selling them a car. Healthcare is a business just like a car dealership, and patients are their customers, so expecting healthcare providers to support a level of health information exchange (a/k/a Interoperability) that would enable another healthcare provider to take business away from them is naive to say the least. Competition is a reality for modern hospitals.. you’ve seen the billboards. They’re more comfortable with the old school business model. Interoperabilty is a double edged sword for them.

I think that most hospitals would agree with this view, but they’ll likely only share it behind closed doors. The hospitals understand the benefits to healthcare of sharing their data with each other, but as a business it doesn’t make sense. As I mention in the article, I’m hopeful that things like value based reimbursement and ACOs can help shift that model where it does make business sense for a hospital to share their data. In fact, I think we’re heading to a day where if you don’t share data you’ll be at a disadvantage.

While we’re heading in that direction, it’s hard to face the stark reality of what Thomas says. Healthcare is still a business and healthcare leaders salaries and bonuses are based on successfully running the business. If we want to have interoperability, we have to change the incentives so that they match that goal.