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Can Cloud Computing Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis?

Posted on November 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The title of this post comes from a whitepaper called “How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis” that was done by Intel together with CareCloud and terremark (A Verizon Company). My initial reaction when reading this whitepaper was “what looming healthcare IT crisis are they talking about?”

The whitepaper makes the general case about the challenges of so much regulation, security, and privacy issues related to healthcare IT. I guess that’s the crisis that they talk about. Certainly I agree that many a healthcare CIO is overwhelmed by the rate of change that’s happened in healthcare IT to date. Is it a crisis? Maybe in some organizations.

However, more core to what they discuss in the paper is whether cloud computing can provide some benefits to healthcare that many organizations aren’t experiencing today. The whitepaper cites a CDW study that just 30 percent of medical practices have transitioned to cloud computing services. No doubt I’ve seen the reluctance of many organizations to go with cloud computing. Although, as one hospital CIO told me, we have to do it.

The whitepaper makes the case that cloud computing can help with:
-Security, compliance and privacy
-Cost efficiency and improved focus
-Flexibility and scalability

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the whitepaper and its comments on the value of cloud computing. Should healthcare be shifting everything to cloud computing? Is there a case to be made for in house over cloud computing? Will some sort of hybrid approach win out?

Verizon Launches HIPAA-Compliant Cloud Services

Posted on October 4, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Last month, I shared some of Verizon’s big plans for the medical space with you, including their desire to become the industry’s default carrier of secure healthcare data.  This week, Verizon has launched its cloud service line, and I wanted to share some of the details on how it’s set up with you.

Verizon’s Enterprise Solutions division is offering five “healthcare-enabled” services, including colocation, managed hosting, enterprise cloud, an “enterprise cloud express edition” and enterprise cloud private edition. In addition to the services, Verizon provides a HIPAA Business Associate Agreement which, one would assume, is particularly stringent in how it safeguards data storage and tranmission between parties.

The new Verizon services will be offered through cloud-enabled data centers in Miami and Culpeper, Va. run by Terremark, which Verizon acquired some time ago. Security standards include PCI-DSS Level 1 compliance, ITIL v3-based best practices and facility clearances up to the Department of Defense, Verizon reports.

In addition to meeting physical standards for HIPAA compliance, Verizon has trained workers at the former Terremark facilities on the specifics of handling ePHI, Verizon exec Dr. Peter Tippett told Computerworld magazine.

You won’t be surprised to learn that Verizon is also pitching its (doubtless very expensive) health IT consulting services as well to help clients take advantage of all of this cloud wonderfulness.

Not surprisingly, Verizon notes in its press release that “each client remains responsible for ensuring that it complies with  HIPAA and all other applicable laws and applications.”  If I were Verizon, I’d be saying that too, and doubtless states the obvious. That being said, it does make me wonder just how much they manage to opt out of in their business associate agreement.  Call me crazy, but I think they’d want to leave as much wiggle room as humanly possible.

The bigger question, as I see it, is how big the market for these services really is at present. According to the Computerworld story, only 16.5 percent of healthcare providers use public or private clouds right now. Verizon may be able to turn things around on the strength of its brand alone, but there’s no g uarantees. I guess we’ll have to wait and see.