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Healthcare Super Bowl – Winning with EHR Adoption – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on January 15, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
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The most important – and most vulnerable – connection between strategy and execution is the actual performance of people.

~ Charles Fred, Breakaway

It’s the end of football season and the Super Bowl, the game that determines the best team in the country, wait – in the world – will be played February 2 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The more I learn about the game, the more impressive the depth of leadership, preparation, strength, training, and split-second adaption the sport involves.

Clinicians need to be just as prepared for their own Super Bowl where they score touchdowns by improving patient care, meeting government regulations, and increasing efficiency related to their use of the best technologies. Electronic health record usage is a large part of the government’s Meaningful Use initiative. As of July 2013, 82% of hospitals successfully achieved Stage 1 Meaningful Use and continue to work to adopt EHR technology. How can providers and hospitals support their teams toward EHR success?

Engaged Leadership

First, let’s take a cue from Vince Lombardi, legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers who said that “individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.”

A group is brought together by the leaders whether it’s the coach, a foreman, or an executive team. In the healthcare setting, the right tone for any change is set at the top of the organization. When adopting a major change like an EHR, leadership has the responsibility of making a game plan, getting the best people involved, and finding the right EHR education solution to help them succeed.

Education

Which brings us to training and education. Rod Marinelli, currently of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers says, “I love coaching young players and it starts with the staff that understands how to teach.” When taking on the challenge of introducing a new EHR, a hospital needs a good plan with the right trainers. A good program doesn’t try to teach every intricacy of a play in detail in order to prepare for every scenario on the field.

The same concept applies to a hospital adopting a new EHR. Dr. Heather Haugen, Managing Director at The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, has done significant research on EHR adoption. In Beyond Implementation: A Prescription for Lasting EMR Adoption,Dr. Haugen states that “we know from nearly nine decades of research about adult learning that humans do not learn without a natural progression from discovery through experience. The average human brain is a very poor storage device for information and data, unless that information is recalled and reinforced immediately by experiential activities.” Rather than memorization of facts and workflows, a more efficient way to learn an EHR is through simulations of those workflows. Teach the process and decision-making and the learner creates their own pathways to making the right moves.

Metrics

How do we know that the leadership coaching and the simulation training are working? By measuring the results. In football, the final score is what matters. As 20-season wide receiver Jerry Rice says, each person must take the necessary steps to reach the goal. In his words, “today I will do what others won’t, so tomorrow I can accomplish what others can’t.” Making big changes to process is difficult in execution and in motivation. But by employing the right leadership team as the “coach” along with the proper training and education, when EHR adoption is measured, the right results are possible.

Keeping Pace with Change – Sustainment

After implementing a new EHR application, it would be a mistake to assume that everything would stay the same day-to-day. Adopting an EHR rather than simply implementing an EHR indicates that an organization uses and depends on the system to make them better and more efficient. (Implementation implies only usage of the system, which leaves room for inefficiency and work-arounds.)

Once adoption is reached, it’s a continual process to stay at that level. With staff turnover, changes to software applications, and process updates, coaching, training, and keeping score fall into a plan of sustainment or the ability to keep pace with change. In the football world, Heisman Trophy winner Roger Staubach calls it dedication: “confidence doesn’t come out of nowhere. It’s a result of something…hours and days and weeks and years of constant work and dedication.” It takes continual effort to continually strive for improvement.

The Final Score

To reach the goals of excellent patient care, timeliness, efficiency, and to meet government regulations, each of these four elements must a priority, which is the definition of The Breakaway Method: Engaged Leadership, Education, Metrics, and Keeping Pace with Change. All of the pieces must be in play in order to make the most of any organization. Just as in football, the coaching staff, training program, measurements of results, and changes that meet each week’s challenges are critical.

Football does teach us that the road to success is long, to maintain success is hard, but winning is the name of the game.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Super Bowl Power, Video EMR, EMR Data Standards, and EMR Spend

Posted on February 3, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


In case you missed the Super Bowl, the power went out for a good 30-45 minutes. It’s the EMR’s fault. We could create a whole comedy routine blaming a hospital’s problems on the EMR I think.


I’ve talked about video in EMR for about 7 years. The problem is we don’t have a great way to pull the data out of the video. Plus, I’m sure there will be many that resist the idea of a video recording of their patient visits. I still see it happening one day soon. I wonder if HealthSpot will be doing this in their kiosks.


Who should be creating the structured data standards? I’d like doctors themselves doing it, but they’re too busy (or so most of them say).


I wonder when this spending will stop. At the end of meaningful use?

Edible Microchip Tracking Device, AAYUWIZ EHR, and EMR + Analytics

Posted on January 22, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most regular readers know, on the weekend I’ve been doing a weekly Twitter round up of interesting tweets about EMR and EHR. Well, this week I came across all sorts of odd tweets. Also, it seems that someone with EMR in their Twitter name has been talking about the Giants making it to the Super Bowl. On that note, I’m not sure I really care whether the Giants or the Patriots win the Super Bowl. Although, I think it will be a fun game to watch. Push came to shove, I’ll take the Giants defense for the win. Enough football, back to the health IT and EMR talk.

This tweet is going to blow your socks off a little bit. We all know this type of technology is coming, but it’s crazy to think that it’s actually starting to be done. I might have to do a full post on this type of technology later:


For those who didn’t go read the article, it talks about an edible microchip that reports patient compliance with medication. Seems a bit extreme no? It’s still quite a ways off, but is interesting to consider.

This next tweet is fascinating and the landing page it goes to is even more fascinating. Mostly because the tweet and landing page feel more like spam than they feel like a legitimate company. So, tread lightly if you click:


As best I can tell this is a legitimate company. Although, I can’t understand why someone would think naming EMR software AAYUWIZ. Really? You’ve got to be able to do better than that. This looks like one of the MANY (and I mean many) EHR software that have been developed by Indian companies.

I don’t know the entire process these companies go through, but so many of these Indian (and probably other countries as well, but all the ones I’ve seen have been from India) development houses see an opportunity to create EHR software. After developing the EHR software, they reach out to people like myself asking for help on bringing their EHR software to America. Seems like a really risky business model to me. At least a couple of them do have Indian healthcare strategies as well, but many seem to be solely focused on the US market with no way of actually entering the market.


I like this idea. In fact, I’m a little surprised that I haven’t seen anyone do this before. What kills me is that there are probably 100-200 projects like it in healthcare that could benefit from better use of technology, but for one reason or another we haven’t gotten to it…yet(?). Seems like Lawrence Lin is working on it. Too bad he’s working in China, but from Nashville, TN. Now, I’ve got to meet Lawrence to hear his stories.