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Why Small Medical Practices Are at Great Risk for a Cyber Attack

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The good people at ClinicSpectrum recently shared a look at why small practices are at risk for a cyber attack. They label it as why your EHR is at risk for a cyber attack, but I think their list is more specific to small practices as opposed to EHR. Take a look at their list:

Each of these issues should be considered by a small medical when it comes to why they are at risk for a cyber attack. However, the first one is one that I see often. Many small practices wonder, “Why would anyone want to hack my office?”

When it comes to that issue, medical practices need to understand how most hackers work. Most hackers aren’t trying to hack someone in particular. Instead, they’re just scouring the internet for easy opportunities. Sure, there are examples where a hacker goes after a specific target. However, the majority are just exploiting whatever vulnerabilities they can find.

This is why it’s a real problem when medical practices think they’re too small or not worth hacking. When you have this attitude, then you leave yourself vulnerable to opportunistic hackers that are just taking advantage of your laziness.

The best thing a medical practice can do to secure their systems is to care enough about having secure systems. You’ll never be 100% secure, but those organizations who act as if they don’t really care about security are almost guaranteed to be hacked. You can imagine how HHS will look at you if you take this approach and then get hacked.

EHR Vendor as ACO

Posted on December 18, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I was doing my interview with Dr. Jonathan Bertman and John Mooney about the Pri-Med acquisition of Amazing Charts, Jonathan Bertman made a really interesting comment that stuck with me. I asked him how he thought that Amazing Charts would do in this world of hospitals acquiring medical practices. He said that they were evaluated the environment, but then he suggested something that I’d never heard suggested before.

He said that he was considering the idea of whether Amazing Charts could act as an ACO for its members. You could tell that this was an idea that hadn’t been fleshed out completely. Although, I found it a concept that was really interesting to consider. Could an EHR vendor act as an ACO for the doctors that use their EHR?

The key question to me is really whether an EHR vendor has enough adoption of their EHR in a given area to be able to create an ACO. I imagine an EHR vendor like MEDENT that has only focused on selling their EHR in about 5 states could have enough geographically focused EHR adoption to be able to support the ACO model.

I’ve heard a number of small practice doctors call their colleagues to action when it comes to ACOs. Their call usually includes a reminder to the days of HMO’s when they claimed that doctors weren’t part of the conversation and that they can’t let the same thing happen with ACOs. Could an EHR vendor help to bring all these small practices to the ACO bargaining table? Seems like an interesting idea worth exploring to me.