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Secure Text Messaging is Univerally Needed in Healthcare

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I’ve written regularly about the need for secure text messaging in healthcare. I can’t believe that it was two years ago that I wrote that Texting is Not HIPAA Secure. Traditional SMS texting on your cell phone is not HIPAA secure, but there are a whole lot of alternatives. In fact, in January I made the case for why even without HIPAA Secure Text Messaging was a much better alternative to SMS.

Those that know me (or read my byline at the end of each article) know that I’m totally bias on this front since I’m an adviser to secure text message company, docBeat. With that disclaimer, I encourage all of you to take a frank and objective look at the potential for HIPAA violations and the potential benefits of secure text over SMS and decide for yourself if there is value in these secure messaging services. This amazing potential is why I chose to support docBeat in the first place.

While I’ve found the secure messaging space really interesting, what I didn’t realize when I started helping docBeat was how many parts of the healthcare system could benefit from something as simple as a secure text message. When we first started talking about the secure text, we were completely focused on providers texting in ambulatory practices and hospitals. We quickly realized the value of secure texting with other members of the clinic or hospital organization like nurses, front desk staff, HIM, etc.

What’s been interesting in the evolution of docBeat was how many other parts of the healthcare system could benefit from a simple secure text message solution. Some of these areas include things like: long term care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, Quick Care, EDs, Radiology, Labs, rehabilitation centers, surgery centers, and more. This shouldn’t have been a surprise since the need to communicate healthcare information that includes PHI is universal and a simple text message is often the best way to do it.

The natural next extension for secure messaging is to connect it to patients. The beautiful part of secure text messaging apps like docBeat is that patients aren’t intimidated by a the messages they receive from docBeat. The same can’t be said for most patient portals which require all sorts of registration, logins, forms, etc. Every patient I know is happy to read a secure text message. I don’t know many that want to login to a portal.

Over the past couple years the secure text messaging tide has absolutely shifted and there’s now a land grab for organizations looking to implement some form of secure text messaging. In some ways it reminds me of the way organizations were adopting EHR software a few years back. However, we won’t need $36 billion to incentivize the adoption of secure text message. Instead, market pressures will make it happen naturally. Plus, with ICD-10 delayed another year, hopefully organizations will have time to focus on small but valuable projects like secure text messaging.

April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

In 2014, Health IT Priorities are Changing

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The following is a guest blog post by Cliff McClintick, chief operating officer of Doc Halo. Cincinnati-based Doc Halo sets the professional standard for health care communication offering secure messaging for physicians, medical practices, hospitals and healthcare organizations. The Doc Halo secure texting solution is designed to streamline HIPAA-compliant physician and medical clinician sharing of critical patient information within a secure environment.

2014 is a major year for health care, and for more reasons than one.

Of course, some of the most significant reforms of the Affordable Care Act take effect this year, affecting the lives of both patients and providers.

But it’s also a year in which health care institutions will come to grips with IT issues they might have been putting off. Now that many organizations have completed the electronic health record implementations that were consuming their attention and resources, they’re ready to tackle other priorities.

Expect to see issues related to communications, security and the flow of patient information play big in coming months. At Doc Halo, we’re already seeing high interest in these areas.

Here are my predictions for the top health IT trends of 2014:

  • Patient portal adoption. Web-based portals let patients access their health data, such as discharge summaries and lab results, and often allow for communication with the care team. Federal requirements around Meaningful Use Stage 2 are behind this trend, but the opportunity to empower patients is the exciting part. The market for portals will likely approach $900 million by 2017, up from $280 million in 2012, research firm Frost & Sullivan has predicted.
  • Secure text messaging. Doctors often tell us that they send patient information to their colleagues by text message. Unfortunately, this type of data transmission is not HIPAA-compliant, and it can bring large fines. Demand for secure texting solutions will be high in 2014 as health care providers seek communication methods that are quick, convenient and HIPAA-compliant. Doc Halo provides encrypted, HIPAA-compliant secure text messaging that works on iPhone, Android and your desktop computer.
  • Telehealth growth. The use of technology to support long-distance care will increasingly help to compensate for physician shortages in rural and remote areas. The world telehealth market, estimated at just more than $14 billion in 2012, is likely to see 18.5 percent annual growth through 2018, according to research and consultancy firm RNCOS. Technological advances, growing prevalence of chronic diseases and the need to control health care costs are the main drivers.
  • A move to the cloud. The need to share large amounts of data quickly across numerous locations will push more organizations to the cloud. Frost & Sullivan listed growth of cloud computing, used as an enabler of enterprise-wide health care informatics, as one of its top predictions for health care in 2014. The trend could result in more efficient operations and lower costs.
  • Data breaches. Health care is the industry most apt to suffer costly and embarrassing data breaches in 2014. The sector is at risk because of its size — and it’s growing even larger with the influx of patients under the Affordable Care Act — and the introduction of new federal data breach and privacy requirements, according to Experian. This is one prediction that we can all hope doesn’t come true.

To succeed in 2014, health care providers and administrators will need to skillfully evaluate changing conditions, spot opportunities and manage risks. Effective health IT frameworks will include secure communication solutions that suit the way physicians and other clinicians interact today.

Doc Halo, a leading secure physician communication application, is a proud sponsor of the Healthcare Scene Blog Network.

January 30, 2014 I Written By

A CIO Guide to Electronic Mobile Device Policy and Secure Texting

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The following is a guest blog post by Cliff McClintick, chief operating officer of Doc Halo. Doc Halo provides secure, HIPAA-compliant secure-texting and messaging solutions to the healthcare industry. He is a former chief information officer of an inpatient hospital and has expertise in HIPAA compliance and security, clinical informatics and Meaningful Use. He has more than 20 years of information technology design, management and implementation experience. He has successfully implemented large systems and applications for companies such as Procter and Gamble, Fidelity, General Motors, Duke Energy, Heinz and IAMS.
Reach Cliff at cmcclintick@dochalo.com.

One of the many responsibilities of a health care chief information officer is making sure that protected health information stays secure.

The task includes setting policies in areas such as access to the EMR, laptop hard drive encryption,  virtual private networks, secure texting and emailing and, of course, mobile electronic devices.

Five years ago, mobile devices hadn’t caught many health care CIOs’ attention. Today, if smartphones and tablets aren’t top of mind, they should be. The Joint Commission, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and state agencies are scrutinizing how mobile fits into organizations’ security and compliance policies.

Be assured that nearly every clinician in your organization uses a smartphone, and in nearly every case the device contains PHI in the form of email or text messages. That’s not entirely a bad thing: The fact is, smartphones make clinicians more productive and lead to better patient care. Healthcare providers depend on texts to discuss admissions, emergencies, transfers, diagnoses and other patient information with colleagues and staff. But unless proper security steps are being taken, the technology poses serious risks to patient privacy.

For creating a policy on mobile electronic devices, CIOs can choose from three broad approaches:

  • Forbid the use of smartphones in the organization for work purposes. This route includes forbidding email use on the devices. Many companies have tried this approach, but in the end, it’s not a realistic way to do business. You may forbid the use of the technology and even have members of your organization sign “contracts” to that effect. But even for the people who do comply out of fear, the organization sends the message that it’s OK to violate policy as long as no one finds out.
  • Allow smartphones in the organization but not for transmitting PHI. This approach acknowledges the benefits of the technology and provides guidelines and provisions around its use. This type of policy is better than the first option, as the CIO is taking responsibility for the use of the devices and providing some direction. In most cases there will be guidelines regarding message life, password format, password timeout, remote erase for email and other specifics. And while the sending of PHI would not be allowed, protocol and etiquette would be in place for when the issue comes up. Ultimately, though, this approach can be hard to enforce, and the possibility remains that PHI will be sent to a vendor or out-of-IT-network affiliate.
  • Create a mobile device strategy. This option embraces the technology and acknowledges that real-time communication is paramount to the success of the organization. In healthcare, real-time communication can mean the difference between life and death. With this approach the technology is fully secured and can be used efficiently and effectively.

Recent studies have shown that more than 90 percent of physicians own a smartphone. Texting PHI is common and helps clinicians to make better decisions more quickly. But allowing PHI to be transmitted without adequate security can compromise patient trust and lead to government penalties.

Fortunately, healthcare organizations can take advantage of mobile technology’s capacity to improve care while still keeping PHI safe. In a recent survey of currently activated customers of Doc Halo, a secure texting solution provider, 70 percent of respondents using real-time secure communication reported better patient care. Seamless communication integration and a state-of-the-art user experience ensure that the percentage will only rise.

Doc Halo, a leading secure physician communication application, is a proud sponsor of the Healthcare Scene Blog Network.

January 6, 2014 I Written By

Should Patients Care About Their Doctors’ Text Messages?

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The following is a guest blog post by Dr. Jose Barreau, CEO of Doc Halo.

For all the money they spend on state-of-the-art EMRs, compliance officers and other measures to ensure they’re protecting their patients’ medical information, many healthcare organizations have a gaping hole in their security.

Physicians and other clinicians are as apt as anyone to send a quick text to a colleague. Maybe an attending physician wants to ask a resident about test results or an office worker needs to pass along a patient’s question.

But standard SMS text messages are not HIPAA compliant. Communicating protected health information in this way could compromise patient privacy and expose your organization to substantial fines.

That’s not to say doctors shouldn’t text. Because of its instantaneous nature, mobile messaging can improve efficiency and quality of care. But healthcare providers should make sure they’re using a secure texting platform.

If you have a non-HIPAA-compliant texting habit, you’re in good company. In research last year, nearly 60 percent of physicians at children’s hospitals said they sent or received text messages for work.

It’s easy to view text messages as “off the record.” Chances are they aren’t going into an EMR, and there’s a sense that no one but the sender and recipient will see them.

But when you fire off a text, you don’t know where it will end up. Some of these text messages contain sensitive details of diagnosis and treatment that have been discussed.  Also it’s hard to say whose servers the messages might be stored on, or for how long.  When patients entrust healthcare providers to care for them, they expect their data to be cared for, too.

The Department of Health and Human Services certainly knows about the problem. Last year the agency told an Arizona physicians practice to address the issue in a risk-management plan. The group “must implement security measures sufficient to reduce risks and vulnerabilities to ePHI to a reasonable and appropriate level for ePHI in text messages that are transmitted to or from or stored on a portable device.”

Healthcare providers can text about their patients without violating HIPAA — but only with secure messaging technology. Here are features to look for in a healthcare texting solution:

  • Encryption at all levels — database, transmission and on the app — with federally validated standards
  • Tracking of whether messages have been delivered, with repeated ping of the user
  • A secure private server that is backed up
  • Remote mobile app wipe option if a phone is lost or stolen
  • Automatic logout with inactivity
  • Ability to work on all spectrums of cell data and Wi-Fi for broad coverage
  • Limited data life — for example, 30 days — for messages

Patients benefit when their healthcare providers have quick and secure ways to stay in touch. A secure text messaging platform can help you to provide better care while avoiding HIPAA violations.

Doc Halo, a leading secure physician communication application, is a proud sponsor of the Healthcare Scene Blog Network.

November 25, 2013 I Written By

Change is Good – 3 Changes That Are Transforming How Physicians Work

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The following is a guest blog post by Dr. Jose Barreau, CEO of Doc Halo.

They say that change is hard and that is generally true. Over the past few years there has been incredible fast-pace change in healthcare. But there are three things that physicians are using everyday with increasing frequency that are fundamentally changing the profession for the better.

1.    Online Medical Information: Gone are the days of textbooks. In Oncology, textbooks are outdated before they hit the shelf. Yes I still love the feel of a good book in my hand but it’s futile to resist. Now with one password physicians can search any disease and read an expert review within seconds. As senior physicians everywhere can attest to, many medical students are wandering the halls fully armed with the latest information and waiting for the opportunity to shine or strike depending on your view. I personally use several websites everyday in my practice. My personal favorite is UpToDate.com, which has excellent content in easy to read format. It also has content for patients. With these resources available on demand a physician becomes very efficient. They can prepare for a challenging patient encounter in a short period of time by reviewing the latest literature on an malady. The efficiency of quickly finding accurate peer reviewed information on any subject has changed the way physicians educate themselves.

2.    Electronic Medical Records: Yes, they take some getting used to but they are good. I clearly remember my fathers paper charts piled high and the Dictaphone chirping one hundred miles an hour when I as a kid. This did not look like fun to me. In today’s medicine EMR isn’t optional, it is a must have. With so many labs, imaging results and physicians involved in one patient’s care, this volume of information can no longer be managed with paper. We use Epic in our organization and once you take the time to become proficient it can be a very effective documentation tool and improve efficiency. I have colleagues that use Allscripts, McKesson, Cerner and several others and all have their strengths and weaknesses, but they provide value. There have been studies that show that efficiency is not improved wit EMR but these studies are not accurate and have many faults in their design. The key is for physicians to take the necessary time to become experts at using their EMR. This can take substantial time but it does pay of in the long run.

3.    Secure Texting Mobile Apps: The pager is not dead but it should be. First it was the physician’s home phone. Then many varieties of pagers emerged from voice to alphanumeric. With the advent of smartphones in every physician’s pocket this is changing rapidly. Why carry a pager when you can have a mobile app on your smartphone that sends and receives HIPAA secure messages. A few of the advanced enterprise solutions like Doc Halo can even integrate with an organizations single sign on system, call center software and send real time alerts. These advanced mobile app based communication systems have features such as “Off Duty” and “Auto Forwarding. They have directories and in network physician lists to help align the health care organizations. In addition in a recent survey 70% of users felt secure texting solutions improve patient care. Physician’s adopting this technology is certainly a trend and if these surveys are correct, a positive one.

These are three key things happening in medicine all around us and as physicians embrace these changes we all benefit.

About Dr. Barreau

As chief executive officer of Doc Halo, Dr. Jose Barreau leads Doc Halo’s development team and operations. He is one of the original founders of secure physician communication text mobile applications. The desire to exchange information quickly and securely with his healthcare colleagues eventually led to the development of the Doc Halo app.

Dr. Barreau is Board-certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology. He completed his fellowship in Hematology – Oncology at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio and sub-specializes in breast cancer treatment.

As the Medical Director of the TriHealth Cancer Institute in Cincinnati, Dr. Barreau works to expand the use of multidisciplinary clinics, which will improve the quality of cancer care through better physician-to-physician communication. www.dochalo.com

Doc Halo, a leading secure physician communication application, is a proud sponsor of the Healthcare Scene Blog Network.

October 28, 2013 I Written By

Email vs Text for Healthcare Communication

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The idea of improving communication in healthcare is always a hot one. For fear of HIPAA and other factors, healthcare seems to lag behind when adopting the latest communication technologies. The most simple examples are email and text message. Both are simple and widely adopted communication technologies and most in healthcare are afraid to use them.

At the core of why people are afraid is because native email is not HIPAA secure and native SMS is not HIPAA secure either. Although, there are a whole suite of communication products that are working to solve the healthcare communication security challenges while still keeping the simplicity of an email or text message. In fact, both of the other companies I’ve started or advise, Physia and docBeat, are focused on the problems of secure email and secure text. Plus, there are dozens of other companies working to improve healthcare communication and hundreds of EMR, PHR, and HIE applications that are integrating these forms of communication into their systems.

As we enter this brave new world of healthcare communication, it’s worth considering some of the intricacies of email vs text. The following tweet is a good place to start.

This is really interesting to note and I can confirm those are the general statistics for most email campaigns out there today. I’m not sure of the number of texts that are open, but it’s clear that the number of text messages that are opened is very high.

The reason this is the case is because of the expectation of what’s inside a text message vs an email. When you receive a text, you can be sure that it won’t take up more than a moment of your time. You can consume it quickly and move on with your life. The same is usually not the case with email (especially email lists). Most of the emails that are sent are lengthy because they can be. We try and pack every option imaginable into an email and so people have an expectation that if they start with the email they’re going to need time. I know this is the case because my email subscribers often thank me for my emails because they know they can get something of value quickly.

I think it was Dan Munro that pointed out an exception to the email open rate. His idea was that if the email contains an action item, then open rates are much higher. This was a good insight. There’s little doubt that if an email contains something that you have to do, then more people will open it and do the action. I don’t get a bill in my email and then don’t open it. I have to open it so I can pay the bill. I’m sure this principle can be applied in a number of ways to healthcare.

As we finally bring these common communication technologies to healthcare we need to be thoughtful about which ones we use and when we use them.

April 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

4th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2013 Sponsored by docBeat

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For those of you planning to attend the annual HIMSS Conference in New Orleans, I’m pleased to announce the details for the 4th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2013.

It’s amazing to think that 4 years have already past since that first event, but I’m really excited by what we’ve put together for all those planning to be in New Orleans for HIMSS. The New Media Meetup is one of the highlights of HIMSS for me each year and I expect this year to be no exception.

A big thanks to docBeat for sponsoring the event and making is possible for those of us in New Media to get together over food and drinks at HIMSS. I hope everyone will check out docBeat and thank them for sponsoring the event.

Now for the details of the event…

Register Here!

When: Tuesday 3/5 6:00-8:00 PM
Where: Mulate’s Party Hall – 743 Convention Center Boulevard, New Orleans, LA MAP
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, and Amazing People

About Our Sponsor
docBeat Secure Text Messaging Logo
docBeat® allows physicians and other healthcare professionals to seamlessly communicate with one another using their mobile phone or web browser while ensuring HIPAA compliance and avoiding liability issues. Plus, there’s no more dealing with the hassle of being on hold to find out who is on call or busy. docBeat® allows physicians to provide a docBeat phone number to be reached at while keeping their actual phone number private. For more information visit www.docbeat.co.

A big thanks also goes out to Erin and Beth from The Friedman Marketing Group for helping us locate a great venue in New Orleans and helping us plan the event. They are class acts and I always love working with them and their PR company.

Finally, thanks as always to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help us promote the New Media Meetup. It’s beautiful to use the power of social media to put on such a great social media event at HIMSS.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in New Orleans very soon!

February 14, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Doctors Increasingly Texting, But HIPAA Protection Lacking

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A new study of physicians working at pediatric hospitals has concluded what we might have assumed anyway — that they prefer the use of SMS texting via mobile phone to pagers. What’s worrisome, however, is that little if any of this communication seems to be going on in a HIPAA-secure manner.

The study, by the University of Kansas School of Medicine at Wichita, asked 106 doctors at pediatric hospitals what avenues they prefer for “brief communication” while at work. Of this group, 27 percent chose texting as their favorite method, 23 percent preferred hospital-issued pagers and 21 percent face to face conversation, according to a report in mHealthWatch.

What’s interesting is that text-friendly or not, 57 percent of doctors said they sent or got work-related text messages.  And 12 percent of pediatricians reported sending more than 10 messages per shift.

With all that texting going on,  you’d figure hospitals would have a policy in place to ensure HIPAA requirements were met. But in reality, few doctors said that their hospital had such a policy in place.

That’s particularly concerning considering that 41 percent of respondents said they received work-related text messages on a personal phone, and only 18 percent on a hospital-assigned phone. I think it’s fair to say that this arrangement is rife with opportunities for HIPAA no-nos.

It’s not that the health IT vendor world isn’t aware that this is a problem; I know my colleague John has covered technology for secure texting between medical professionals and he’s also an advisor to secure text messaging company docBeat. However, not much is going to happen until hospitals get worried enough to identify this as a serious issue and they realize that secure text message can be just as easy as regular text along with additional benefits.

In the mean time, doctors will continue texting away — some getting 50-100 messages a day, according to one researcher — in an uncertain environment.  Seems to me this is a recipe for HIPAA disaster.

November 2, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lawsuits Will Eventually Drive EHR Adoption?

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In the recent #HITsm chat, tireless patient advocate Sherry Reynolds offered this intriguing tweet:


Once EHR’s are the standard of care sadly lawsuits will drive adoption .. “so why didn’t you see the lab results doctor?” #HITsm
@eHealthSherry
Sherry Reynolds

The first question I’d ask based on this tweet is when will EHR become the “standard of care.” I’m sure that some could argue that now based on the $36 billion in EHR incentive money that the government is spending. However, even the most optimistic EHR adoption numbers are at 50% and I’d put it closer to 30% with ambulatory EHR dragging that number down. With that said, what would it take to have EHR as the standard of care that a doctor provider? I’m not a lawyer, but I know a number of healthcare lawyers read this blog. I hope that some of them will chime in with their thoughts.

Sherry’s last comment about not having the lab results points more towards the exchange of healthcare data being the real issue a doctor could face. Not only would this be a potential lawsuit issue for doctors, but at some point enough patients will ask this question as well. I’m sure most doctors aren’t worried since we’re pretty far from that tipping point.

I do think that doctors are quite attune to liability and can be a very big motivating factor for them. I think the same will happen with insecure text messaging in healthcare. The first couple lawsuits against a doctor for sending PHI over text and we’ll see widespread adoption of secure text platforms.

While I can see some of the realities that Sherry tweeted about, a part of me really hates to think that fear of lawsuits would end up being the driving force behind EHR adoption.

August 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Texting is Not HIPAA Secure

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I previously posted the somewhat controversial post: Email is Not HIPAA Secure. It was an extremely important post and included 54 incredible comments discussing email security and email in how it relates to HIPAA. Today I want to discuss the security issues related to text (SMS) messages.

The short story is: Texting (SMS) is NOT HIPAA Secure

I recently did a focus group to discuss physician communication. At one point I asked how many of them use text messages to communicate with other doctors. All of them acknowledged that they used it and that they were using it more and more. I then asked how many sent PHI (protected health information) in the text messages that they sent. While the response wasn’t as strong likely because they knew it was a loaded question, they all acknowledged that PHI was sent by text message all of the time.

One doctor even commented, “They’re not going to put us all in jail.”

There is some validity to this comment. They’re not going to go around like an old school lynch mob putting physicians in jail because they sent some patient information in a text message. Although, that doesn’t mean that they couldn’t go around handing out hefty fines for HIPAA violations.

Let me be clear that there are secure text message platforms out there. I’ve actually been thinking about this quite a bit lately since I’ve been advising a local Vegas Tech iPhone app called docBeat that offers this secure text message functionality for free. In fact, there are quite a few companies that are trying to provide this functionality. Although, I like docBeat because it offers a whole suite of Physician Communication Tools and not just secure text messaging. I think there’s value in a doctor only to have to go to one place for all their communication needs. In a future post, I’ll do a full write up on what docBeat’s offering physicians.

At some point, I think doctors are going to turn the corner and realize that the standard SMS text messaging service that every cell phone has these days is not the right way to communicate. Besides the fact that standard text messaging isn’t secured, it’s also stored forever on the server of your cell phone service provider. Most doctors likely haven’t thought that everything they’ve sent over text could be brought back to haunt them forever.

Other problems with standard text messaging is that you don’t really know what happens with the text message once its sent. Did the text message actually send? Did the person you sent the text message actually receive it? If they received the text message have they read it?

The great thing is that we all finally have realized the value of simple communication with a text message. Now we just need to move to these new secure text messaging platforms that solve the security, reliability and tracking issues with standard text messaging.

April 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.