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Crowdsourcing in Healthcare, Scribes, and Mandated Inefficiencies

Posted on June 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I’m a HUGE fan of crowdsourcing. I do it for so many things in my life and it’s incredibly effective. Although, I haven’t seen much of it done in healthcare. I’d love to hear examples where you’ve seen it done. I guess you could say I’d like to crowdsource a list of where it’s being used for a future post (see what I did there?).


I’ve heard more and more good things about Scribes. I talked to one at ANI whose a Scribe and Med Student. You can see why so many people like them. I think they’re a bandaid for the real problems we have in healthcare, but they’re an effective one that’s not going anywhere (since our problems aren’t going anywhere).


It’s not the first time that I’ve found a tweet from Dr. Pourmassina that perfectly articulates the challenge. “Built-in and mandated inefficiencies” has got to be one of the simplest descriptions of the current state of EHR.

EMR Scribes, EMR Big Brother, Right Tool for Right Job, and MU’s Affect on EMR Adoption

Posted on September 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I’ve heard more and more people proclaiming the value of scribes with their EMR. Certainly many are leery of the costs associated with scribes, but I don’t know anyone who has tried a scribe and been disappointed with the choice.


Far too often when we’re in technology we think that we have to always look for a tech solution to the problem. It is often the case that technology will take part in some part of a solution, but far too often we try and over architect a technology solution. Instead of implementing more technology we need to implement the right technology. Often that means choosing simpler technology.


I think this is an important question. I’m sure cutting MU would cause a lot of shock waves in the industry, but I don’t know many people who would stop their EHR use because MU was gone. I don’t know many that are implementing an EHR that would stop if MU was gone. I don’t think MU will be stopped, but I still think a delay is likely.

Need Point of Care EMR Documentation to Meet Future EMR Documentation Requirements

Posted on April 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As part of my ongoing writing about what people are starting to call the EHR Backlash, I started to think about the shifting tides of EMR documentation. One of the strongest parts of the EHR backlash from doctors surrounds the convoluted documentation that an EMR creates. There is no end to the doctors who are tired of getting a stack of EMR documentation where 2 lines in the middle mean anything to them.

Related to this is the physician backlash to “having to do SOOOO many clicks.” (emphasis theirs) I still love the analogy of EHR clicks compared to playing a piano, but unfortunately EHR vendors haven’t done a good job solving the two things described in that article: fast predictable response and training.

With so many doctors dissatisfied with all the clicking, I predict we’re going to see a shift of documentation requirements that are going to need a full keyboard as many doctors do away with the point and click craziness that makes up many doctors lives. Sure, transcription and voice recognition can play a role for many doctors and scribes or similar documentation methods will have their place, but I don’t see them taking over the documentation. The next generation of doctors type quickly and won’t have any problem typing their notes just like I don’t have any issue typing this blog post.

As I think about the need for the keyboard, it makes me think about the various point of care computing options out there. I really don’t see a virtual keyboard on a tablet ever becoming a regular typing instrument. At CES I saw a projected keyboard screen that was pretty cool, but still had a lot of development to go. This makes sense why the COWs that I saw demoed at HIMSS are so popular and likely will be for a long time to come.

Even if you subscribe to the scribe or other data input method, I still think most of that documentation is going to need to be available at the point of care. I’ve seen first hand the difference of having a full keyboard documentation tool in the room with you versus charting in some other location. There’s just so much efficiency lost when you’re not able to document in the EMR at the point of care.

I expect that as EMR documentation options change, the need to have EMR documentation at the point of care is going to become even more important.

EHR Mouseclicks, #HIT100 Interview, EMR and Doctor-Patient Relationships, and Sleep Rate: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on July 29, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

I apologize for not having a weekly round-up last week — my family and I were in Southern Colorado, and while the owner of the lodge we were staying at said there was Internet available, that didn’t prove to be completely true. So for the next two weeks, these posts will have a combination of two weeks’ of posts. There were some great posts recently, and I’d hate for anyone to miss them!

EMR and EHR

Too Many EHR Mouseclicks and Keystrokes – A Solution for EHR Vendors

Critics of EHRs claim that there are too many mouseclicks/keystrokes involved to consider it efficient. However, there are ways to overcome this complaint. If vendors would focus on making their product respond consistently, and physicians get the training they need, this hurdle can be overcome. It may take awhile for this point to be reached, but it is possible.

EMR Advocate Tops the #HIT100

The #HIT100 list aims to recognize great #HITsm and #HealthIT communities on Twitter. This week, the #1 person on the list, Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers), was interviewed by Jennifer Dennard. She gives her thoughts on social media and health IT, and how it’s affected her career. Stotsky also reflects on the the value that the #HIT100 list brings to the health care community.

The Intersection of EMRs and Health Information Management

While researching for a discussion she was going to moderate on the exchange of personal health information with an ACO at Healthport’s first HIM Educational Summit, Jennifer Dennard stumbled upon some interesting information. This post contains some of her thoughts, and includes a list of the top 10 trends impacting HIM in 2016. At the conclusion of her article, she asks questions concerning Meaningful Use and the relationship HIM professionals have with EMR counterparts.

Happy EMR Doctor

How an EMR Gets in the Way of Doctor-Patient Relationships

While happy with his current EMR, Dr. Michael West talks about the “darkside” of EMRs. He says that he has to pay more attention to his computer than maintaining eye contact with his patients, but this is a problem that will be difficult to resolve. Although he could just jot notes down and update the EMR later, he feels this would be more time consuming and less accurate. Is there are a solution to the barrier created between doctors and patients when an EMR is used?

Smart Phone Health Care

SleepRate: Improves Your Sleep by Monitoring Your Heart

Everyone has trouble sleeping every now and then. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to figure out why. SleepRate, a cloud based mobile service, may be the solution. This service tracks and analyzes the users sleep patterns, and, from that information, gives suggestions on how to improve sleep. It does this by monitoring your heart using a ECG.

App Helps Potential Skin Care Victims Track Moles

1 in 5 Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their life. With a chance this high of getting this terrible disease, it’s more important than ever to monitor moles and other skin lesions. An app created by the University of Michigan Health System, UMSkinCheck, makes that monitoring easier. The app sends reminders about skin checks, and allows the user

EMR Thoughts
Digital Health Takes Off in 2012

Digital Health is growing more and more. Rock Health Weekly reported that there is 73 percent more funding for it this year than at this time last year. The yearly funding report by Rock Health Weekly was recently released, and there were several interesting findings in it. Digital Health isn’t going anywhere.

Hospital EMR and EHR

The Meaningful Use Song (To The Tune of “Modern Major General”)

If you need a little pick-me up, or a smile to end your week, don’t miss this video. The “Meaningful Use Song” includes commentary on MU, written by Peggy Polaneczky, MD, to a catch tune.

From The Horse’s Mouth: What Scribes Are For

Ever wonder what a scribe does, and if they are really even needed? This post includes quotes from Scott Hagood, the director of business development for PhysAssist Scribes. This is a great position for pre-med students, and with the growth of EMR, the field for scribes continues to develop and expand as well.

EHR Use Compensation, Scribes, Healthcare Interoperability, and EMR Marriage

Posted on June 3, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve got a great roundup of tweets this weekend. I’ve found a wide variety of tweets with some really interesting opinions and comments. Some of them were quite shocking when I read them. Others made me laugh out loud literally. I think you’ll enjoy many of them. Plus, I’ll add a bit of commentary to the tweets to add a little extra value to the tweets and the comments made in the tweets.

Let me know what you think of the weekly Twitter round up posts. I think they provide a bunch of interesting comments and perspectives. Let me know if you love them, hate them or something in between.


This one just made me laugh. I’m not sure all the background on the tweet, but I’m sure every doctors I know would laugh at the idea of providers getting compensated for the time they spend on EMR/EHR. I guess you could twist the EHR incentive that way, but that’s far from the same as being compensated for EHR. Unlike some, I do think there are benefits to EMR & EHR use. Although, even then I wouldn’t use the word compensation.


I disagree with this tweet putting research in the bad section. Sure, the current crop of EHR won’t realize the full possibilities in research areas, but it does provide more opportunities than paper for research.

The scribes are an intriguing solution. I think younger doctors won’t care too much for scribes in most cases. However, I think scribes could become very popular in more and more situations. It does help to preserve the physician-patient interaction.


I still wish the EHR incentives would have been for interoperability. EHR adoption would have been a side effect of this incentive. Water under a bridge at this point.


I shared this link to a series of articles I wrote a while back. I was glad that Elin enjoyed the post and so did many others. I’m sure that those new to this blog will enjoy it too.

Doctors’ Training vs. Transcriptionists’ Training

Posted on April 12, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This will be a bit simplified, but I think you’ll get the idea. If you consider a doctor’s training. Doctors are trained in an incredible volume of information and then how to use that information along with a lot of other variables to be able to evaluate patients conditions, provide care and at the end of the day solve problems.

On the other hand, transcriptionists are trained to do repetitive tasks very well with high accuracy. Certainly they have to have some skills with the medical terminology. Also, many have moved beyond transcription into helping with the clinical documentation and ensuring that it’s documented properly.

None of this should be news to anyone. Now for the big finish…

Which training is more suited for someone doing a million clicks on an EMR?

Is it any wonder that scribes and other creative models for documenting a patient visit in an EMR are becoming an important part of the discussion? Watch for many more creative models using people to come out in the next year.