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Patient Engagement Will Be Key to Personalized Medicine and Healthcare Analytics

Posted on February 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I wrote about personalized medicine solutions that are available today, I mostly covered the data aspects of personalized medicine. It’s a logical place to start since the basis of personalized medicine is data. In that post I highlighted the SAP Foundation for Health and the SAP Hana platform along with the work of ASCO and their CancerLinQ project. No doubt there are hundreds of other examples around health care where data is being used to personalize the care that’s provided.

It makes a lot of sense for a company like SAP to take on the data aspects of personalized medicine. SAP is known for doing massive data from complex data sets. They’re great at sorting through a wide variety of data from multiple sources and they’re even working on new innovations where they can analyze your data quickly and effectively without having to export every single piece of data to some massive (Translation: Expensive) enterprise data warehouse. Plus, in many cases they’re doing all of this health data analytics in the cloud so you can be sure that your healthcare analytics solution can scale. While this is a huge step forward, it is just the start.

As I look at the discussion around personalized medicine, what seems to be missing is a focus on creating a connection with the patient. Far too often, analytics vendors in healthcare just want to worry about the data analysis and don’t build out the tools required to engage with the patient directly. This leads to poor patient engagement in two ways: improving patient communication and collecting patient data.

Improving Patient Communication
As we look into the future of reimbursement in healthcare, it’s easy to see how crucial it will be to leverage the right data to identify the right patients. However, you can’t stop there. Once you’ve identified the right patients, you have to have a seamless and effective way to regularly communicate with that patient. As value based reimbursement becomes a reality, no healthcare analytics solution will be complete without the functionality to truly engage with the patient and improve their health.

Patient engagement platforms will require the following three fundamentals to start improving care: interaction between patient and caregiver, privacy, and security. No doubt we’re already starting to see a wide variety of approaches to how you’ll communicate with and engage the patient. However, if you don’t get these three fundamentals down then all of the rest doesn’t really matter. The basis of improved patient communication is going to be efficient communication between patient and caregiver in a secure and private manner.

Collecting Patient Data
Too many analytics platforms only focus on the data that comes from the healthcare providers like the EHR. As the health sensor market matures, more and more clinically relevant data is going to be generated by the patient and the devices they use at home. In fact, in some areas like diabetes this is already happening. Over the next 5 years we’re going to start seeing this type of patient generated data spread across every disease state.

Health analytics platforms of the future are going to have to be able to handle all of this patient generated health data. The key first step is to make it easy for the patient to connect their health devices to your platform. The second step is to convert this wave of patient generated health data into something that can easily be consumed by the healthcare provider. Both steps will be necessary for personalized medicine to become a reality in health care.

As we head into HIMSS 2016 in a couple weeks, I’ll be looking at which vendors are taking analytics to the next level by including patient engagement. While there’s a lot of value in processing healthcare provider data, the future of personalized medicine will have to include the patient in both how we communicate with them and how we incorporate the data they collect the 99% of their lives spent outside of the hospital.

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member. You can learn more about SAP’s healthcare solutions during #HIMSS16 at Booth #5828.

Making Precision Medicine a Reality with Dr. Delaney, SAP & Curtis Dudley, VP at Mercy

Posted on February 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live interview, you can watch the interview on YouTube below:

You can also watch the “after party” where Shahid Shah joins us and extends the discussion we started:

Making Precision Medicine a Reality-blog

Ever since President Obama announced the precision medicine initiative, it’s become a hot topic in every healthcare organization. While it’s great to talk theoretically about what’s happening with precision medicine, I’m always more interested with what’s actually happening to make medicine more precise. That’s why I’m excited to sit down with a great panel of experts that are actually working in the trenches where precision medicine is being implemented.

On Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Curtis Dudley from Mercy and Dr. David Delaney from SAP where we’re going to dive into the work Curtis Dudley and his team are doing at Mercy around perioperative services analytics that improved quality outcomes and reduced delivery costs.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

If you can’t join our live video discussion or want to learn more, check out Mercy’s session at HIMSS16 called “HANA as the Key to Advanced Analytics for Population Health and Operational Performance” on March 1, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at SAP Booth #5828.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Will Your Healthcare Analytics Solution Scale?

Posted on October 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the big themes being talked about at the Healthcare IT Transformation Assembly this week and particularly during my Care Performance Transformation roundtable with Midas+ has been around healthcare analytics and the solutions that will help a hospital utilize their data for population health, value based reimbursement, and improved care. This has made for an interesting discussion for me after having attended SAP Teched last week where SAP talked about the need for the right healthcare data solution that can scale to the needs of healthcare.

At both of these events it became very clear that the future of healthcare is being built on the back of healthcare data. The quantity and quality of healthcare data is expanding rapidly. There’s a lot of healthcare data being generated within the 4 walls of every healthcare organization. There’s a lot of healthcare data being generated outside of the healthcare setting. Plus, we’re just barely getting started with all of the data that’s needed for all the -omics (Genomics and Proteomics). Getting a handle on this data and ensuring the data can be trusted is of paramount concern for healthcare leaders.

What seems to be playing out is healthcare organizations are having to choose to invest in both point solutions and larger healthcare analytics solutions. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be one catch all solution that will solve all of a healthcare organization’s data transformation needs. None of the current solutions scale across all types of data and solve all of the current healthcare requirements. Although, some could eventually grow into that role.

In today’s discussion in particular, a number of hospital CIOs made clear that they had no choice but to have a variety of care transformation and healthcare analytics solutions. There wasn’t one integrated solution they could purchase and be done. In many ways it reminds me of the early days of PM, HIS, LIS, and EHR purchasing. Most purchased them separately because there wasn’t one integrated solution. However, over time people moved to buying one integrated system across PM, EHR, LIS, etc as the software become integrated and mature. Will we see the same thing happen with our healthcare analytics solutions?

While we’ve seen the move to more integrated healthcare IT solutions, we’re also seeing a move away from that now as well. Every EHR vendor is working on APIs to allow third party companies to integrate new solutions with the EHR. There’s a realization that it would be nice if the EHR could do everything in one nicely integrated solution, but it won’t. It’s a cycle that we see in software. I imagine we’ll see that same cycle with healthcare analytics solutions as well.