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Applying Geospatial Analysis to Population Health

Posted on June 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Megan Williams wrote a very interesting piece called “Geospatial Analysis: The Next Era of Population Health” in which she highlighted Kaiser’s efforts to use geospatial analysis as part of their population health efforts. Here’s her description of their project:

This means using data to inform policy adjustments and create intervention programs that lead to meaningful change. One of the best examples of this lies with healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente. In April, they launched a database that gave researchers the ability to examine patient DNA and bump it against behavioral and environmental health factors. The goal of the project is to pull information from half a million patients and use it to build one of the most “diverse repositories of environmental, genetic and health data in the world,” which could then be used to inform research around conditions including diabetes and cancer and their relationships to issues including localized violence, pollution, access to quality food and other factors.

This type of effort from Kaiser is quite incredible and I believe will truly be part of the way we shift the cost curve on healthcare costs. One challenge to this effort is that Kaiser has a very different business model than the rest of the healthcare system. They’re in a unique position where their business benefits from these types of population health efforts. Plus, Kaiser is very geographically oriented.

While Kaiser’s business model is currently very different, one could argue that the rest of healthcare is moving towards the Kaiser model. The shift to value based care and accountable care organizations is going to require the same geospatial analysis that Kaiser is building out today. Plus, hospital consolidation is providing real geographic dominance that wasn’t previously available. Will these shifting reimbursement models motivate all of the healthcare systems to care about the 99% of time patients spend outside of our care? I think they will and large healthcare organizations won’t have any choice in the matter.

There are a number of publicly and privately available data stores that are going to help in the geospatial analysis of a population’s health, but I don’t believe that’s going to be enough. In order to discover the real golden insights into a population, we’re going to have to look at the crossroads of data stores (behavioral, environmental, genomic, etc) combined together with personal health data. Some of that personal health data will come from things like EHR software, but I believe that the most powerful geospatial personal health data is going to come from an individual’s cell phone.

This isn’t a hard vision to see. Most of us now carry around a cell phone that knows a lot more about our health than we realize. Plus, it has a GPS where all of those actions can be plotted geospatially. Combine this personally collected health data with these large data stores and we’re likely to get a dramatically different understanding of your health.

While this is an exciting area of healthcare, I think we’d be wise to take a lesson from “big data” in healthcare. Far too many health systems spent millions of dollars building up these massive data warehouses of enterprise health data. Once they were built, they had no idea how to get value from them. Since then, we’ve seen a shift to “skinny data” as one vendor called it. Minimum viable data sets with specific action items tied to that data.

We should likely do the same with geospatial data and population health and focus on the minimum set of data that will provide actual results. We should start with the skinny data that delivers an improvement in health. Over time, those skinny data sets will combine into a population health platform that truly leverages big data in healthcare.

Where do you see geospatial data being used in healthcare? Where would you like to see it being used? What are the untapped opportunities that are waiting for us?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Galaxy Will See You Now

Posted on May 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We all know how dramatic our lives have changed thanks to technology. Many of us remember the impact a computer in every home had on our lives. Now we’re seeing that same transformation happening as we all start carrying a smartphone in our pocket. Each of these technologies has opened up new worlds of possibilities in our personal lives and also for healthcare. I think we’ll see a similar transformation with the introduction of voice recognition and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

When we start talking about AI, most of us probably think about the movies they’ve seen where AI was on display. Hollywood’s use of AI in movies often makes it so it doesn’t feel very real. However, if you have a smartphone, then you’ve probably used AI. I know my first real experience with AI was on my Samsung Galaxy S3. I remember my wife and I going on a date and we spent the majority of our date asking “Galaxy” various questions. We got surprisingly good answers including easy access to the show times for the movie we ended up seeing.

Most of us have had this type of experience with AI on our smartphone. It’s pretty magical, but I must admit that I didn’t use it that often when it was just on my phone. There were a few cases it was really useful like when I was driving and needed directions to a gas station. The hands-free access to information was extremely powerful, but it wasn’t part of my daily experience. However, that changed for me when I introduced an always on AI solution in my home. Now it’s become a daily part of me and my family’s life.

How does this apply to healthcare? It’s becoming very clear that the home is the healthcare hub of the future. Think about having always on tablets, smart TVs, and other devices positioned throughout your home where you can easily access your health information, medical knowledge, and healthcare providers. That’s powerful. Plus, those devices and attached sensors are starting to easily monitor you, your environment, and your health. This two way connection creates an extremely powerful combination that will change the way we view healthcare.

Certainly there are practical examples of home health services that exist today including monitoring recently discharged patients, monitoring seniors, connecting patients with doctors, and much more. We’re seeing all of these connected home health services happen more and more every day. Just what we’ve already begun to implement will improve the healthcare we provide dramatically. However, we’re just starting to explore what AI and new technologies can do for healthcare. The best is still to come.

How long will it be before we can sit at home and we can ask our tablet or smart TV “Galaxy, how’s my blood pressure doing today?” Or “Galaxy, can you schedule me a telemedicine visit with my doctor to discuss my prescription refill?” Not to mention Galaxy proactively reaching out to you to motivate healthy decision making.

What’s so incredible is that executing these ideas and many more aren’t that farfetched given the powerful technology that exists today. We still need to connect a few dots, but it’s all extremely doable from a technical perspective.

What’s going to be harder is the cultural shift and change of mindset. However, that’s happening already and it will accelerate over time. I’m sure my kids wouldn’t think twice about asking our TV or tablet for a doctor’s appointment and then having the doctor streamed right to the TV or their tablet. They probably wonder why it’s not already possible.

Even while we wait for this more automated AI future, there are still big home health things happening on smartphones and tablets. Each of those things is a building block to this exalted future. I’m ready for Galaxy to see me now. In fact, in some ways he already does. Are you ready?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Samsung Invests Big in Virtual Reality at Facebook’s F8 Conference

Posted on April 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Ever since the CES conference earlier this year, I’ve been extremely interested in the virtual reality and augmented reality space. There’s a lot of potential for virtual reality in healthcare including in: training, diagnosing and treatment. Plus, I always remember that the best use cases for technology are often ones we can’t even imagine because of our own biases and constrained thinking. However, as we invest more in virtual reality, we’ll discover even better ways to apply the technology to healthcare.

This week Samsung and Facebook made a huge investment in virtual reality when they gave away a new Samsung Gear VR Headset and custom Galaxy smartphone to the 2600 developers attending Facebook’s F8 developer conference. That’s a lot of developers that will start building on top of this new virtual reality platform. I’ve already seen my healthcare developer friend post on social media about her kit. I’ll be interested to see what she creates.
Samsung Gear VR - Healthcare
I’ve certainly heard many of the naysayers talk about virtual reality. They argue that the early versions are expensive, require powerful computers, are tethered, require headsets and can cause headaches. These are all challenges, but most of them will be fixed as the technology evolves and matures. Plus, being healthcare I found the comment around headaches really interesting. I got headaches and eye strain from Google Glass, but I’ve never had an issue with virtual reality giving me a headache. It’s definitely something to watch though.

These challenges aside, I’ve found my experiences with virtual reality to be absolutely immersive. I totally lost myself in the experience and almost forgot the world around me. As I think back on that experience, I did realize that the key to an amazing experience was compelling content. If I was watching or doing something in a virtual world that wasn’t interesting, then you would have definitely lost me. Let that be a lesson to everyone in healthcare. You only get one chance to make a first impression on healthcare. Be sure that whatever healthcare virtual reality use case you’re working on has really compelling content. If you don’t, you’ll burn a whole generation of decision makers on virtual reality.

With this in mind, it’s going to be just as important for us to watch the virtual reality content creation space as the virtual reality display devices themselves. Can we make virtual reality content in a cost effective way? How hard will it be to create compelling content? Will the quality of the content be good enough to apply it to medicine?

These are all open questions I’ll be watching in the virtual reality space. However, given the impressive progressive we’ve seen over just the past couple years, I’m really excited by the possibilities. Healthcare better prepare for virtual reality based training and education. Soon enough your doctor will be diagnosing you using virtual reality and possibly from a remote destination. It’s not hard to imagine many treatment options being made available in a virtual reality environment.

Virtual reality in healthcare has some really incredible opportunities. I’m excited to see such a huge investment in virtual reality by both Samsung and Facebook. A lot of that innovation is going to trickle down into healthcare.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

April Fool’s Day – Health IT Edition

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I love a good April Fool’s day joke. I don’t like those that hurt people, but I love good humor (ask me about the time my wife said she was going into labor and wasn’t). You may remember my past years’ pranks about the #HIT100 Health IT Company, the ONC Reality TV show, and my personal favorite where we announced we’d be selling our own EHR software. Good memories all around.

This year I’ve been busy organizing the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy other people’s work. I’m sure I’ve missed some of the great health IT related April Fool’s day jokes, so let me know of others in the comments.

The big winner for April Fool’s 2016 for me was SnapChart from Twine Health. You’ll particularly enjoy it if you’re a SnapChat user, but it’s a great one either way. This video should demonstrate what I mean:

Well done Twine Health! I think even patient privacy advocates would appreciate SnapChart. “We all know that EHRs suck. Well this EHR only sucks for 7 seconds….BOOM”

Another honorable mention goes to Epic who has a long standing tradition of offering something entertaining on April Fool’s Day:
Epic April Fool's Day 2016
*Click on the image to see a larger version

Nice work by Epic to keep it topical with reference to Clinton and Sanders. However, the one that takes the cake is Jonathan Bush using MyChart. The only thing that would make me laugh more would be if athenahealth put out a video response from Jonathan Bush. Please?!

Cureatr decided to go old school with a new technology called the Faxenatr:

Howard Green, MD posted this announcement from Alphabet Inc and Google Inc’s company Verily Life Sciences about the UHIT (Universal Health Information Technology).

So many others I could mention outside of health IT. This one from Samsung about a 3D holographic projection was cool:


Although, when you look at what’s happening with VR, maybe it will be more reality than we realize.

Gmail’s Mic Drop is pretty funny. Well, at least it was until people starting losing their job because of it. The concept of a mic drop on email or social media is pretty interesting though. I wonder if there’s a way you could really implement something like it.

What other April Fool’s day jokes have you seen. It’s Friday. We all need a good laugh.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT? – Post #HIMSS16 Blab

Posted on March 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the recording of our discussion in the video embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business and Dell is sponsoring my trip to participate in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT-blog

On Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with the Chief Medical Officers of both Samsung and Dell. As we recover from HIMSS 2016, we’ll be sharing the positive things we saw, heard and are doing in healthcare IT. Far too many people at HIMSS are focusing on the challenges and downside of healthcare IT. In this live video chat, we’re going to focus our discussion on the innovations and amazing technologies that are making healthcare better for everyone.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Plus, considering the size of HIMSS, the three of us likely only saw a small portion of the amazing innovations and technologies that were on display at HIMSS. Please join us on blab and share things you found at HIMSS that everyone should know about.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Also, you can see Dr. Nick and myself on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event March 15th on Twitter using the #DoMoreHIT hashtag and the Livestream.

Securing Mobile Devices in Healthcare

Posted on February 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you look at healthcare security on the whole, I think everyone would agree that healthcare has a lot of work to do. Just taking into account the top 5 health data breaches in 2015, approximately 30-35% of people in the US have had their health data breached. I’m afraid that in 2016 these numbers are likely going to get worse. Let me explain why I think this is the case.

First, meaningful use required healthcare organizations to do a HIPAA risk assessment. While many organizations didn’t really do a high quality HIPAA risk assessment, it still motivated a number of organizations to do something about privacy and security. Even if it wasn’t the step forward many would like, it was still a step forward.

Now that meaningful use is being replaced, what other incentive are doctors going to have to take a serious look at privacy and security? If 1/3 of patients having their records breached in 2015 isn’t motivating enough, what’s going to change in 2016?

Second, hackers are realizing the value of health data and the ease with which they can breach health data systems. Plus, with so many organizations going online with their EHR software and other healthcare IT software, these are all new targets for hackers to attack.

Third, while every doctor in healthcare had a mobile device, not that many of them accessed their EHR on their mobile device since many EHR vendors didn’t support mobile devices very well. Over the next few years we’ll see EHR vendors finally produce high quality, native mobile apps that access EHR software. Once they do, not only will doctors be accessing patient data on their mobile device, but so will nurses, lab staff, HIM, etc. While all of this mobility is great, it creates a whole new set of vulnerabilities that can be exploited if not secured properly.

I’m not sure what we can do to make organizations care about privacy and security. Although, once a breach happens they start to care. We’re also not going to be able to stem the tide of hackers being interested in stealing health data. However, we can do something about securing the plethora of mobile devices in healthcare. In fact, it’s a travesty when we don’t since mobile device security has become so much easier.

I remember in the early days of smartphones, there weren’t very many great enterprise tools to secure your smartphones. These days there are a ton of great options and many of them come natively from the vendor who provides you the phone. Many are even integrated into the phone’s hardware as well as software. A good example of this is the mobile security platform, Samsung KNOX™. Take a look at some of its features:

  • Separate Work and Personal Data (Great for BYOD)
  • Multi-layered Hardware and Software Security
  • Easy Mobile Device Management Integration
  • Enterprise Grade Security and Encryption

It wasn’t that long ago that we had to kludge together multiple solutions to achieve all of these things. Now they come in one nice, easy to implement package. The excuses of why we don’t secure mobile devices in healthcare should disappear. If a breach occurs in your organization because a mobile device wasn’t secure, I assure you that those excuses will feel pretty hollow.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare