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Are Client Server EHR Holding Back Healthcare?

Posted on December 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The number one topic of debate on this blog has definitely been Client Server EHR versus SaaS EHR. There are staunch parties on both sides of this aisle. No doubt both sides have a case to make and we’ll see both in healthcare for a long time to come. Although, I think that long term the SaaS EHR will win out.

As I was thinking about this recently, I realized that while client server EHR can do everything a SaaS EHR can do, it definitely makes a lot of things much harder to accomplish.

It’s much harder to create an API that connects to 2000 client server EHR installs.

It’s much harder to make 2000 client server EHR installs interoperable.

It’s much harder to evaluate data across 2000 client server EHR installs.

I’m sure I could keep going with this list, but you get the point. Even though something is possible, it doesn’t mean that they’re actually going to do it. In fact, if it’s hard to do, then it takes extreme pressure for them to do it.

All of this has me begging the question of whether client server installs are holding back the EHR industry. Up until now, many of the things I mention above haven’t been that important. Going forward I think that all three of the things I mention above are going to be very important.

The good thing is that I see many client server EHR moving to some kind of hosted EHR solution. That solves some of the problems mentioned above. At least if it’s a hosted EHR solution, they can control the environment and more easily implement things like API access and interoperability. That’s much harder in the client server world where if you have 2000 EHR installs, you have 2000 unique setups.

Of course, as soon as a large SaaS EHR has a massive breach, healthcare will go running after the client server EHR. The battle lines are drawn and each side knows each other very well. Although, I think the SaaS EHR have the high ground right now. We’ll see how that continues over time. Client server EHR have done an amazing job battling.

Can Cloud Computing Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis?

Posted on November 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The title of this post comes from a whitepaper called “How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis” that was done by Intel together with CareCloud and terremark (A Verizon Company). My initial reaction when reading this whitepaper was “what looming healthcare IT crisis are they talking about?”

The whitepaper makes the general case about the challenges of so much regulation, security, and privacy issues related to healthcare IT. I guess that’s the crisis that they talk about. Certainly I agree that many a healthcare CIO is overwhelmed by the rate of change that’s happened in healthcare IT to date. Is it a crisis? Maybe in some organizations.

However, more core to what they discuss in the paper is whether cloud computing can provide some benefits to healthcare that many organizations aren’t experiencing today. The whitepaper cites a CDW study that just 30 percent of medical practices have transitioned to cloud computing services. No doubt I’ve seen the reluctance of many organizations to go with cloud computing. Although, as one hospital CIO told me, we have to do it.

The whitepaper makes the case that cloud computing can help with:
-Security, compliance and privacy
-Cost efficiency and improved focus
-Flexibility and scalability

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the whitepaper and its comments on the value of cloud computing. Should healthcare be shifting everything to cloud computing? Is there a case to be made for in house over cloud computing? Will some sort of hybrid approach win out?

Is The Cloud The Best EHR Model For Small Practices?

Posted on June 5, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last few years, the use of EMRs in medical practices has grown dramatically, with over 50 percent of office-based physicians now using such systems.  However, physicians still face major barriers in adopting EMRs, including costs, usability issues and impacts on doctor productivity.

One way of reducing the complexity of EMR installations — doing more for less — is to go with a Web-based model of EMR  use, argues “The Cloud: The Best EHR Solution for Small Practices.”

This model, also known as “software as a service” (SaaS) stores patient data in the cloud, accessible from any secure device connected to the Internet.

Not only does the cloud/SaaS model make it easy to access patient data,  it saves practices having to come up with a large up-front installation fee to set up software on site. Instead, practices pay a monthly fee which is predictable (and usually, manageable).

The price difference is very striking. The average cost of a client-server implementation over five years ranges from $30K to a whopping $80K per provider, not including the cost of training, interfaces, patient portals and conversions from other systems, the white paper notes.

But cost isn’t the only reason for small practices to go with a cloud/SaaS EHR. Increasingly, physicians are going mobile with care, via smartphone and tablet. As the Bring Your Own Device phenomenon explodes, practices are going to want an EHR which can easily be accessed and used via the Internet.

Read this paper to learn more about mHealth and how a cloud/SaaS solution can support your small practice’s mobile strategy while protecting critical data offsite in the event of a disaster; being sure that your data is encrypted at rest as required by Meaningful Use; and even how doctors can use voice to chart notes.

Of course, there are many who still argue against a cloud based EHR. They have their reasons that are worthy of consideration. An in house client server EHR does have its advantages over SaaS EHR. You have to weigh the pros and cons of each. Then, you can make a great decision for your organization.

The Move to Cloud EHR

Posted on August 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m pretty sure that many people missed the announcement that Amazing Charts now offers a Cloud EHR. For those who don’t eat, sleep and breathe EHR like me, you probably don’t realize that this is a pretty significant announcement on Amazing Charts part and I think represents a larger shift in the EHR industry.

I know the SaaS EHR purists will say that not all “Cloud EHR” are created equal. This is highlighted in the Amazing Charts press release where it says “without a web browser.” It’s an ironic statement when you consider that most SaaS EHR happily say, “with only a web browser.” (Although, the web browser only EHR software companies should read this post by Dr. West) However, my goal here isn’t to highlight the various nuances of hosted or cloud EHR software.

Instead, I wish to highlight how one of the popular, established, client server EHR software vendors was getting enough requests from doctors for a hosted EHR solution that they now offer a cloud based EHR. The reality is that many physician practices want to have to deal with as little IT support as possible. This is the major reason I’ve heard over and over again that many practices want to have a hosted EHR.

It’s worth pointing out that Amazing Charts focuses on the small physician practice market. It’s always been clear that the larger physician practices or hospital owned practices have better capabilities and a greater interest in hosting their EHR in house. While there are strengths and weaknesses to a hosted EHR vs an in house EHR, the hosted EHR is the compelling choice for the IT averse clinic.

Very soon we’re going to see almost all new EHR installs in small ambulatory practices using some sort of hosted EHR software. This doesn’t necessarily spell the death of client server EHR software. Many large practices will continue using and implementing client server EHR software. Not to mention many long time EHR users will continue with their existing client server installs. However, the shift to hosted EHR is happening and will start to really pick up pace in the next couple years.

Full Disclosure: Amazing Charts is an advertiser on this site, but they didn’t know I was doing this post.

EHR Incentive Inflates EHR Pricing

Posted on July 25, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent conversation I had, the question of EHR pricing came up. It was suggested in the conversation that EHR incentive money was inflating EHR pricing.

I wish that I had harder data on the price of EHR software. Unfortunately, there’s no really good source of EHR pricing across all the 600+ EHR comanies. At one point I considered the idea of creating such a resource, but the challenge of getting that type of information is ominous and might be impossible since many EHR vendors keep that information very close to the chest.

Since we don’t have the quantitative data that we’d love to have in this situation, instead let me offer some observational data on EMR pricing.

In my first couple years blogging about EMR software (I started EMR blogging 6+ years ago), I was able to witness a dramatic shift in the price of EHR software. The norm 6+ years ago was for an EMR for a small clinical practice to cost somewhere in the $30,000 range. For a larger group practice they were easily paying $100,000-200,000 for their EHR software. In almost every case this was a huge up front lump sum payment for the EHR software. Although, many of them conveniently offered financing for your purchase. These EHR were almost always an in house EMR software that needed a lot of up front costs for things like a server.

In those early years, we started to see a wave of mostly SaaS EHR software enter the market at a much lower price point. In most cases they were offering their EHR software for a small monthly fee (usually around $350-500/doctor). Of course at this same time a number of Free EHR software entered the market as well. Both of these entrances forced the price of EMR software to decrease dramatically. Sure, a few EMR software vendors pillaged a practice for an ourtrageous price, but for the most part the price of EMR software came down. Plus, the movement to the monthly charge pricing model for EMR software took hold. In most cases, EMR software vendors would offer a one time fee EMR pricing model along side a monthly per doctor EMR pricing model.

Over the past couple years I think we generally saw a leveling off of EMR pricing. However, I have seen one major thing happen with EMR pricing since the EHR stimulus money was introduced. The new bar for EMR pricing was set at $44k over 5 years. You can be certain that every EHR vendor has looked at their EHR pricing and compared it to the $44k over 5 years.

While I can’t say I’ve seen long time EHR vendors increase the price of their EHR to match the $44k of EHR incentive money, what I have seen is new EHR vendors pricing their EHR software accordingly. Instead of pricing their EHR according to market pricing, they’re generally inflating their EHR price to match the EHR incentive money. I believe this has driven the overall cost of EHR software up thanks to the EHR incentive money. Plus, it has held the EHR pricing of some EHR vendors higher than it would have been if the EHR incentive money weren’t there.

One other thing worth considering is the long term effect on EHR pricing because of the EHR incentive money. EHR incentive is creating an artificial pricing bubble, but eventually the incentive money will run out and I expect a number of EHR vendors to drop their price when that happens. However, what might have an even longer term impact on EHR pricing is the increased number of EHR vendors thanks to the EHR incentive money. Standard economics says more EHR competition leads to lower EHR prices.

What have you seen related to EMR pricing? I’d love to hear your thoughts and experience.

What SaaS EHR Users Can Learn from the Megaupload Takedown

Posted on July 5, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time to talk about a subject near and dear to my readers hearts: SaaS EHR. In this article, we’re going to take a serious look at some of the risks associated with the pure SaaS EHR model. I’m sure this will leave many concerned about SaaS EHR software. Before I get into that, I want to be clear that I can (and probably will) make a future post about client server EHR software that will likely leave you just as concerned.

The point isn’t that SaaS EHR or client server EHR is better than the other. I take a much more “switzerland” approach to the topic. I think both approaches to EHR have their risks, challenges, benefits and advantages. To me it’s much more important that users are educated on the risks of each so that they can address them properly.

With that in mind, I was recently reading one of my favorite venture capital bloggers, Brad Feld, who posted a guest post by Dave Jilk about what SaaS software vendors can learn from the Megaupload and its impact on the future of Multi Tenant Services. For those not familiar with the Megaupload situation, the Feds basically took down Megaupload and seized everything they had in response to copyright infringement violations. Wired has an interesting article about the case.

What then can we learn from the Megaupload case that applies to SaaS EHR companies. I think Dave Jilk describes the SaaS risks better than I could:

What this particular case illustrates is that a company that provides your online service is a single point of failure. In other words, simply offering multiple data centers, or replicating data in multiple locations, does not mitigate all the risks, because there are risks that affect entire companies. I have never believed that “availability zones” or other such intra-provider approaches completely mitigate risk, and the infamous Amazon Web Services outage of Spring 2011 demonstrated that quite clearly (i.e., cascading effects crossed their availability zones). The Megaupload situation is an example of a non-technical company-wide effect. Other non-technical company-wide effects might be illiquidity, acquisition by one of your competitors, or changes in strategy that do not include the service you use.

So again, while this is a striking and unfortunate illustration, the risk it poses is not fundamentally new. You need to have an offsite backup of your data and a way to use that backup. The situation where the failure to do this is most prevalent is in multi-tenant, shared-everything SaaS, such as Salesforce.com and NetSuite. While these are honorable companies unlikely to be involved in federal data confiscations, they are still subject to all the other risks, including company-wide risks. With these services, off-site backups are awkward at best, and more importantly, there is no software available to which you could restore the backup and run it. In essence, you would have to engage in a data conversion project to move to a new provider, and this could take weeks or more. Can you afford to be without your CRM or ERP system for weeks? By the way, I think there are steps these companies could take to mitigate this risk for you, but they will only do it if they get enough pressure from customers. Alternatively, you could build (or an entrepreneurial company could provide) conversion routines that bring your data up and running in another provider or software system fairly quickly. This would have to be tested in advance.

As many of you know, I’ve been quite interested in this topic and risk for quite a while. I’m sympathetic to those doctors that want at least a copy of their data stored somewhere that they control. Yes, most SaaS EHR vendors have a good set of backup, disaster recovery and business continuity plans. However, as the above quote points out so well, that doesn’t deal with the “non-tecnical company-wide effects.”

I’ve long considered the idea of creating a set of standards that SaaS EHR vendors could adopt. Things like making a practice’s entire EHR data available in an easily downloadable XML format. That could be the starting point. I think it would also create a real competitive advantage to those EHR vendors that adopted these type of common sense, good customer service practices.

I’d even be happy to lead the EHR agnostic team that it would take to make this happen. Client Server EHR software vendors could be involved as well. Not to mention I’d be happy to provide a voice to the movement on my network of EMR websites. I think the key to success would be getting a couple EHR vendors to get on board with the idea and fully invested in seeing this happen. The challenge is that too many EHR vendors are blinded by the meaningful use lights.

Let’s just imagine for a minute that doctors that select an EHR didn’t have to worry about their data being safe. They knew that they could have their data available to them when they needed it where they needed it regardless of what happened to the vendor. I have that with my blog data. Although, instead of that making me wanting to change blogging platforms, it’s endeared me to WordPress even more.

I wonder if Todd Park could add this idea to his concept of EHR Data Liberacion.

Cloud Computing Won’t Be the Death of Client Server EMR – Something Else Will Be

Posted on May 9, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the all time favorite topics of discussion here at EMR and HIPAA is around SaaS EHR software versus client server EHR software. They each go by many other names and the technical among us might know the hard core technical difference between each, but most doctors don’t know and don’t care. SaaS EHR software is often called hosted EHR software or ASP EHR software or even Cloud Computing if you want to use a general term. Client Server EHR software is sometimes called in house EHR software or self hosted EHR software. I’m sure there are other names I missed.

Regardless of what you call it, many people (usually those from SaaS software vendors) believe that client server software will lose out to the cloud. It’s hard to argue with them since in almost every other industry cloud based software has won.

Here’s why I don’t think we’re going to spell the death of client server software for a long time to come. Client server is going to be here for a long time because of such wide adoption by so many doctors. Not to mention, many of the client server EHR systems are really large implementations that would be hard to displace. Plus, there are many doctors who don’t care about the mobile benefits of a SaaS based EHR software. Quite a few doctors want to only use their EHR software in their office.

Certainly there are others on a client server based EHR system which will want to access their EHR outside of their office. Unfortunately, instead of EHR replacement we’re likely to see a hybrid environment that supports client server and some sort of app environment come out of the various client server EHR vendors.

Sure, a lot of doctors will also use Citrix or other remote desktop environments and hate the user experience, but it will pacify them until the hybrid EHR environment is built. In fact, that hate towards the remote desktop environment on a mobile device will drive the development of this hybrid approach. The advantages of a client server environment with an app connection will keep the client server environment around for a while.

So, while many want to declare the death to client server, I’m not ready to do so. Sure, SaaS EHR software has its advantages, but client server software isn’t going to go down without a fight and they’re going to be around for a while since in many cases they hold the high ground.

GE Centricity Advance Ceasing Operations

Posted on January 26, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I had the opportunity to talk with the people from GE who briefed me that GE is in the process of shutting down their GE Centricity Advance product line. This was pretty big news to me since I remember just last year at HIMSS meeting with GE and hearing that for the small practice (I believe 1-10 docs) GE Centricity Advance was where they were putting all their effort. You could see the energy they had behind it. In fact, their iPad EHR app was built on top of the GE Centricity Advance solution (which is now being moved to their other EHR product lines).

You might remember that the GE Centricity Advance solution was actually created out of the purchase of MedPlexus in March 2010. At the time, MedPlexus had 100 employees out of California with the development team out of India. At the time of purchase it seemed GE’s acquisition would provide a SaaS based EHR option to the independent physician market. Plus, MedPlexus (which became GE Centricity Advance) also provided an integrated Practice Management System with the EHR.

The GE Centricity Advance website is already forwarding to the Centricity Practice Solution website and a letter was sent out to all Centricity Advance customers informing them that the product line was ceasing operation. I’ve asked for a copy of that letter and if I get it, I’ll add it to this post (or if you’re a customer that received it and doesn’t mind sharing we’d welcome it).

I was told that GE is offering Centricty Advance users a free transfer to their Centricity Practice Solution EHR software. From what they told me it seems this will include data migration, training on the new system and a license for Centricity Practice Solution. Of course, Centricity Advance was paid on a subscription model so they’ll have to continue paying the monthly fee. As with most data migrations, I don’t think we’ll know how good GE is at migrating the data from GE Centricity Advance to Centricity Practice Solution until they start to do them.

Since both Centricity Advance and Centricity Practice Solution have ONC-ATCB complete EHR certification, there shouldn’t be any problems for those that transfer to Centricity Practice Solution when it comes to EHR stimulus money. Those not wanting to move to the Centricity Practice Solution will have this as part of their decision on what to do once Centricity Advance is no longer supported. I expect there will be many in this situation since while Centricity Practice Solution is available through GE’s partners as a “SaaS” offering, I think many will want to find a true from the ground up web based SaaS EHR offering.

I asked how many providers would be effected by the end of the Centricity Advance product line, but it’s GE’s policy to not comment on those numbers.

Where does this leave GE Centricity EMR software?
GE Healthcare IT still does a couple billion dollars of business and still has three EMR software offerings:
*Centricity Practice Solution – The replacement for Centricity Advance and will be GE’s EMR offering for the 1-100 provider practices.
*Centricity EMR – Still ambulatory EMR, but for the 100+ provider practices.
*Centricity Enterprise – Acute care EMR

I’m sure that many will wonder how good the Centricity Practice Solution will do in the small practice arena. Will this basically mean that GE is no longer a player in the small 1-10 provider practices? It’s hard to say for sure, but I’ll be interested to see how the Centricity Practice Solution EHR does in this market. There must have been a reason they purchased what became Centricity Advance instead of going with Centricity Practice Solution in the first place.

On the other hand, I could see people making the argument that this is a sound strategy by GE since movements like accountable care organizations (ACO’s) and related initiatives are putting the small practice in jeopardy. We know that many hospital systems are purchasing up group practices as they prepare to become an ACO among other reasons. While we still have many small group practices, it’s worth considering how many of them will survive the changing landscape. If not many survive, then this strategy by GE could end well for them. Although, I personally believe that practice consolidation is cyclical and so I’m not ready to announce the death of small group practices yet.

Another trend that might make this a good decision on GE’s part is what I call the Smart EHR. Our current phase of EHR adoption is basically converting paper to electronic. Once doctors start requiring EHR software to do things far more advanced (see Artificial Intelligence and Genomics EHR), it will require a new kind of EHR. Maybe Centricity Advance wasn’t prepared to make this shift. We’ll see if GE’s other EHR software is ready for it.

Many have argued that EHR consolidation is inevitable. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that part of that EHR consolidation is happening within the same EHR company. I’m sure there are more on the way as we see which EHR companies survive the meaningful use winter and come out on the other side and which EHR companies close up shop.

Update: I asked GE for some more clarification on when GE Centricity Advance would be sunset and which data they’ll be migrating as part of the data migration process. Here are their answers:
Sunset Period: We have announced that we will cease operations of Centricity Advance on June 30, 2012. The data will be available in read-only mode until December 31, 2012.

Data Migration: We are working with our partners and customers to figure out the best way to migrate data. We have told customers that we will migrate the following data:
a. Patient Demographics, Patient Insurance data, Fee Schedules, Appointments
b. Patient Summary
c. Patient chart
We will migrate all clinical data. We are working with our partners to determine which financial information should be automatically migrated.

Software User Interface Redesign

Posted on December 8, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I opened up a web browser and eventually made it to Twitter to see what was going on. I was greeted by the not so friendly Twitter site redesign. If you’re on the Twitter page at all, you won’t miss it. To be honest, it felt like going to a foreign land. I use a number of tools for Twitter, but my favorite is just going to the Twitter website to consume and send my @techguy tweets. Although, maybe I should say it WAS my favorite place.

Yes, change is always hard, but isn’t that kind of the point? Was there any announcement about the change before it happened? Nope! Did they give users a chance to try the new interface before they made a wholesale swap to the new interface? Nope. Google’s actually done this really well recently with things like Gmail. They’ve made the new interface available, but you can always click back to the old interface if you don’t like. That way they can solicit feedback and improve the new interface while still not alienating those that love the old interface.

In my example on Twitter, I quickly was able to identify the thing that annoys me most. When I click on someone’s Twitter name it gives me a pop up box for that person. Before it use to have that appear on the side. It’s a small subtle change, but makes a huge difference since on the side I can continue consuming tweets, but in a pop up box I have to remove it before I continue on.

I could go on about the new Twitter, but the point is that software vendors have to be careful when they change the user interface. Maybe this new Twitter interface will even grow on me. I didn’t like the last time they changed the Twitter interface either, but once I found some of the secret features I came around for the most part. Maybe I’ll come around on this too, but it would have been nice if I knew it was coming.

What does this have to do with EMR?

The connection seems quite clear to me. EMR and EHR companies have to be really careful and considerate when they change their EHR interface. Give users options to be able to try it and to adapt to it over time. With a sort of limited opt in release of a new EMR interface to an active user base, you’ll likely get a lot of pointed feedback for the new EMR interface. Certainly you’ll get the useless “I hate the new look” emails without any value. However, you’ll also get the pointed emails that provide constructive ideas on things you probably didn’t realize were important in the old EMR interface.

Most SaaS EHR companies are constantly considering this since they’re rolling out changes to their software all the time. Client server based EHR software also takes it into account, but this can be shown and taught as each client is upgraded.

The main point is to be thoughtful of and upgrade to your EHR user interface. Get feedback and whenever possible let them opt in and out of the new interface so you don’t alienate your users.

While I may not be totally enamored by the new Twitter interface, I do always love new features in software. For example, as part of the new Twitter interface there’s a feature that lets you embed tweets. Here’s a few EMR related tweets to see how it works.


And then some big news from GE and Microsoft that just came out:

Hmmm…still looks like they have some work to complete on their embedded tweets (UPDATE: The preview looked different from when it’s posted. It’s not too bad in the actual post). Sounds like many doctors talking about EHR features that get rolled out.

Conflicting Indications of the Move to SaaS Based EHR

Posted on November 29, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the really interesting things I noted while attending the NextGen user group meeting had to do with the move to SaaS based EHR and other SaaS based EHR software. I partially mentioned this in the write up I did at the conference, including a tweet where I talk about how Scott Decker really pushed the idea of NextGen making the move into the SaaS based software world.

I think there’s little doubt that NextGen sees the value of SaaS based software. I think they see the convenience to doctors of not having to manage a server. Most importantly, I think they see the value of not having the healthcare data stored in EHR in silos.

One thing that Scott Decker mentioned in his keynote was improving their coding rules engine based on the feedback and experience across all of their SaaS based EHR users. I found this really intriguing since it highlighted some of the challenges and limitations of the client server EHR model that’s so prevalent in healthcare.

After hearing these comments about NextGen’s move towards more and more SaaS based software, I wondered what users at the meeting thought about the move by NextGen to SaaS EHR. The nice part of a user group meeting is I had a chance to talk to a number of them.

One company I talked to said basically, “We have 30 Citrix servers in our NextGen EHR installation. That’s a huge investment we’ve made and I don’t see us changing that any time soon.” They’ve got an interesting point. There’s a lot of money invested in training, equipment, software, and general understanding of the current client server EHR installs that NextGen employs (or is it employed?) for its large EHR customers.

It’s quite a stark contrast to consider this entrenched client server user base that is unlikely to change even if NextGen’s direction is headed towards SaaS EHR software. To be completely honest, I’m not exactly sure how this “conflict” is going to play out.