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Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/16 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Danielle Siarri (@innonurse) on the topic of “Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR).”

As technology continues to evolve, the clinicians’ skill set will need to continue to keep up with the health tech evolution. Virtual reality actually stimulates our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality. Augmented reality (AR) is a blend of virtual reality (VR) and real life. AR users are able to interact with virtual contents in the real world and to distinguish between the two. A new term Mixed Reality is a hybrid reality that merges real and virtual worlds to produce new environments /visualizations where physical/digital objects co-exist then interact in real time. Currently VR and AR are being used to simulate and support medical and nursing training as well therapy for patients for anxiety and pain control.

Clinical practitioners are using VR prior to surgery instead of sedation. In Sweden, pharmacist are using VR for pain control. At a California hospital VR is being used for children with terminal cancer to “transport” them during long hospital and facilitate end of life care. Physiologist are using VR for agoraphobia and treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to expose patients mentally without physically putting them in challenging environment.

Join us for the #HITsm chat for the topics of VR/AR in healthcare technology.

This Week’s Topics
T1: What are some ways you have seen VR/AR used to improve the patient’s experience? #HITsm

T2: What are some uses of Mix Reality that could be applied to clinical education? #HITsm

T3: What are implications of using 360 videos and VR with patients with limited mobility? #HITsm

T4: What are some of the future implication of AR, VR, MR in healthcare technology and why? #HITsm

T5: What are the barriers to implementing and widespread adoption of VR/AR into practice? #HITsm

Bonus: What efforts are in place to improve the divide in education and digital health literacy with VR/AR? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/23 – Clinical Intelligence
Hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth)

6/30 – EHR Optimization
Hosted by Max Stroud (@MMaxwellStroud), Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell), and Julie Champagne (@JulieEChampagne)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Health System & Health Plan Innovation, Change & Growth During Uncertain Times – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/9 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by @HCExecGroup, @_GWConnect and @_GuideWell as part of #AHIPInstitute on the topic of “Health System & Health Plan Innovation, Change & Growth During Uncertain Times.”

Major forces of change – including consumerism, value-based care, risk-sharing between health systems, providers and payers, the need to address health equity, and new market entrants – have ‘invaded’ healthcare in the United States over the past decade. Moreover, the Affordable Care Act, ongoing regulatory pressures and uncertainty resulting from healthcare reform efforts have further amplified the need for health systems, health plans, hospitals and healthcare providers to evaluate new business models and diversify their business; all while devising innovative ways to stay relevant and competitive in their markets as they improve health outcomes, lower costs & improve equity for all.

This chat will explore topics related to innovation and factors impacting how healthcare organizations change and grow during this uncertain time. Join us Friday, 6/9 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) for a lively discussion.

This Week’s Topics
T1: What specific ‘areas of opportunity’ must health plans/systems address to improve health outcomes, lower costs & improve equity? #HITsm

T2: What must health systems & health plans focus on over next 8 to 18 months regardless of health reform outcome? #HITsm

T3: Who’s most likely to disrupt healthcare: insiders or outsiders? And what barriers do each face – right now or in near future? #HITsm

T4: What technologies will do the most to move healthcare supply-side toward improving outcomes, lowering costs & enhancing equity? #HITsm

T5: Incentives drive innovation. How can they be aligned to meaningfully support innovation that improves outcomes & lowers costs? #HITsm

Bonus: What are examples of innovative healthcare programs, processes, people and organizations – U.S.-based or elsewhere? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/16 – Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR)
Hosted by Danielle Siarri (@innonurse)

6/23 – Clinical Intelligence
Hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth)

6/30 – EHR Optimization
Hosted by Max Stroud (@MMaxwellStroud), Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell), and Julie Champagne (@JulieEChampagne)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Stories, Not Just for Story Time Anymore – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on May 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/2 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Susannah Meadows (@susannahmeadows) and the #WTFix Community on the topic of “Patient Stories, Not Just for Story Time Anymore.”

There’s a new conference happening Wednesday June 14th that’s focused fully around the patient and the problems that exist in health care as we know it. The conference is called What’s the Fix? or #WTFix for short.

The great part about the conference is that it costs nothing to attend and they’re making it available for free in person and virtually. Plus, I love their focus on the patient. Knowing that this conference was just around the corner, I reached out to Burt Rosen and his team who are organizing the event and asked if they had someone from their conference that could host the #HITsm chat talking about the patient perspective.

We’re blessed that Susannah Meadows (@susannahmeadows) was willing to host this week’s #HITsm chat. Susannah just published her book “The Other Side of Impossible” which was featured in this New York Times article. Thanks Susannah for sharing your story and hopefully during the #HITsm chat she can inspire others to share theirs. I don’t think we can ever get enough patient perspectives.

We can’t wait to talk patient stories in this week’s #HITsm chat. Here are the questions we’ll be discussing.

T1: Why are patient stories important (and you are a patient too)? #HITsm

T2: Where do you hear patient stories? Do you ever ask your friends or neighbors? #HITsm

T3: What’s the most impactful story you’ve heard #HITsm

T4: What Have you changed as a result of what you’ve heard? #HITsm

T5: How do you create an environment that’s safe for story sharing and doesn’t feel exploitative? #HITsm

Bonus: What are the best and worst conferences for hearing patient stories? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/9 – Health Plan Innovation, Change and Growth During Uncertain Times
Hosted by @HCExecGroup, @_GWConnect and @_GuideWell as part of #AHIPInstitute

6/16 – TBD
Hosted by Danielle Siarri (@innonurse)

6/23 – Clinical Intelligence
Hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth)

6/30 – EHR Optimization
Hosted by Max Stroud (@MMaxwellStroud), Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell), and Julie Champagne (@JulieEChampagne)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Health Data Sharing and Patient Centered Care with DataMotion Health

Posted on April 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Now that the HIMSS Haze has worn off, we thought we’d start sharing some of the great video interviews we did at HIMSS 2016. In this case, we did a 3 pack of interviews at the DataMotion Health booth where we got some amazing insights into health data sharing, engaging patients, and providing patient centered care.

First up is our chat with Dr. Peter Tippett, CEO of Healthcelerate and Co-Chairman of DataMotion Health, about the evolution of healthcare data sharing. Dr. Tippett offers some great insights into the challenge of structured vs unstructured data. He also talks about some of the subtleties of medicine that are often lost when trying to share data. Plus, you can’t talk with Dr. Tippett without some discussion of ensuring the privacy and security of health data.

Next up, we talked with Dennis Robbins, PHD, MPH, National Thought Leader and member of DataMotion Health’s Advisory Board, about the patient perspective on all this technology. He provides some great insights into patients’ interest in healthcare and how we need to treat them more like people than like patients. Dr. Robbins was a strong voice for the patient at HIMSS.

Finally we talked with Bob Janacek, Co-Founder and CTO of DataMotion Health, about the challenges associated with coordinating the entire care team in healthcare. The concept of the care team is becoming much more important in healthcare and making sure the care team is sharing the most accurate data is crucial to their success. Learn from Bob about the role Direct plays in this data sharing.

Thanks DataMotion Health for having us to your booth and having your experts share their insights with the healthcare IT community. I look forward to seeing you progress in your continued work to make health data sharing accessible, secure, and easy for healthcare organizations.

EHR Backlash, ACO, and Center of Care – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on May 11, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: What’s your take on the emerging #EHRBacklash? A post-Meaningful Use fad, or a movement with actual potential?

 

Topic Two: Will patients ever take their place at the center of the care team? Do they know that they should care about it?

 

Topic Three: What does #ACO mean to you? Does anyone understand what will make them sustainable? Does human behavior even permit such things?

 

Topic Four: Open Forum. What topics are you tuned into right now? #healthIT

 

HIE as Avenue for New Patient Acquisition

Posted on November 23, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve mostly taken a bit of time off to enjoy Thanksgiving with the family. I hope you’re doing the same and enjoying the start of the holidays.

For those of you still grinding away, I thought I’d throw out a thought that one of my readers told me in an email discussion we were having. They suggested that at some point they believed that the HIE (Health Information Exchange) would be a way to get new patients. They admitted that it wasn’t the original intent of the HIE, but was still a likely outcome.

I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about how to drive new patients to a doctors office for my new Physia venture. Although, I have to admit that I hadn’t been thinking about HIE as a way to get new patients. I’ll be chewing on that a little bit this holiday weekend. I’d love to hear other non-traditional ways you’re using to find new patients.

Expanding the Healthy Patient – Doctor Relationship

Posted on August 9, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Patient Doctor Relationship
It seems like this topic keeps coming up in my online and social media reading. Basically, the discussion usually centers around the role the patient plays in healthcare. Many people like to discuss what has been called the ePatient. I instead want to talk about the motivations of patients and their ability to influence the healthcare system.

Patients in healthcare are unlike “customers” in many other industries. I can’t think of a single patient that wants to go and see a doctor. Ok, maybe they like the doctor and they want to get whatever’s ailing them fixed, but to a person I’m sure we’d say that going to the doctor is the last place we want to be. It’s not like going shopping for a new pair of shoes. There’s nothing you get to take home from the doctor. Well, at least nothing that you really want to take home.

Plus, healthcare is an interesting thing, because often it’s not clear if you should go to the doctor or not. If my A/C is broken, then it’s quite clear that I need to call an A/C repairman. Seeing a doctor is quite different since it’s a fine line between when you need to go and see the doctor versus when your body will heal on its own. I think we’ve all hated the doctor visit where they check you out and basically say there’s nothing they can do for you. Well, other than send you the bill for your visit. I guess that’s the cost of the peace of mind that you get from the visit (I know I’ve done that with my kids a few times).

Please don’t take this as me knocking doctors or the healthcare profession. They provide an absolutely essential and critical role in our lives. Without great doctors many of us wouldn’t be here today. My point in this post is that the patient doctor relationship is quite different than the customer business relationship that we’re use to seeing.

Online Patient Portals
Take for example the online patient portal. Many people love to go on Amazon.com (or insert your preferred shopping site) and browse through all the various things they could buy. We all know people who spend hours shopping. I don’t think I’ve ever heard someone say that they wanted to spend hours browsing through their patient portal. You know, someone who just couldn’t wait to see what great healthcare services their doctor could provide them.

The only partial exception to the above reasoning is possibly the chronic patient. If I’m a diabetic patient, then I am going to have an ongoing dialogue with my care provider and the services they provide. I’m going to be interested in monitoring and tracking my care in collaboration with the treatments that my doctor provides.

Is there a reason why we don’t want this kind of interaction for our general healthcare?

Regular Online Interaction with Doctors
Why shouldn’t I go online on a regular basis so that my doctor can assist me in total wellness even when I’m a healthy patient? The difference here of course lies in doctors treating symptoms and illness as opposed to a very different form of care: wellness. To be honest, I’m not sure I’ve seen any doctors who treat healthy patients. Sure, some doctors do provide some pro-active wellness information during a sick visit to the doctor. Regular physicals are the closest we come to doctors treating healthy patients, but how many health people get those? It feels counter intuitive that we would go and see a doctor when we’re healthy or appear to be healthy. However, maybe that’s the shift our healthcare system needs.

Reimbursement Model Challenge
One real challenge with what I just described is the reimbursement model we have in healthcare. We’ve incentivized treatment of sickness and illness. We haven’t (yet?) incentivized treatment of healthy patients and promotion of wellness. This sounds a bit like the ACO discussion that’s become so popular these days. I’ll be interested to see how these incentives play out. Word on the street is the train has left the building and reimbursement is going to be tied to healthcare outcomes in the future.

Healthy Patient Motivation
Unfortunately, another major challenge I see is that healthy patients aren’t really motivated by wellness initiatives. I’m sure that there are people that understand this phenomenon a lot better than I. Although, I think it’s abundantly illustrated when you talk to someone who’s getting older and starting to lose their health.

It seems particularly poignant for highly successful people that start to get older. How many times have we heard during Oprah or a Barbara Walters interview someone talk about being willing to give up all their riches and fame to just have their health (and they often throw family in there too)? All the time! The problem is that it takes old age or some other health incident for people to make healthy living and wellness an important part of their life. Which begs the question of whether even a change in the reimbursement model for healthcare will get unmotivated people to visit their doctors and be “treated” even when they’re a healthy patient.

Gamification of Healthcare
One idea that I find incredibly intriguing is the idea of gamification of healthcare and wellness. The basic concept behind gamification is to create incentives for people to do the behaviors you want them to do. I believe Foursquare was one of the first applications to do this. They would give you electronic badges and crown you as mayor as you did certain things on their mobile app. It was (and still is) amazing to see what people will do for a little electronic badge and the electronic title of mayor (Turns out this works in the offline world as well. There’s a reason boy scouts give out badges, beads and pins.). The question is how can we apply rewards systems to incentivize healthy behavior and wellness?

To be completely honest, I don’t think I’ve seen anyone crack the gamification code in healthcare. Although, I think the concept is just beginning. I predict in the next couple years that we’re going to see some amazing mobile and web applications that really drastically impact our motivation to healthy living.

The closest I’ve seen so far has been something like the Nike+ device and website. It’s a simple device that tracks your running habits either in a watch, iPod or even in your shoe. Then, that device uploads your running data to a website where you can create and track your running progress. It also provides a social experience, but that’s a topic for another day.

I actually find these tracking device/website combinations (see the FitBit and DigiFit as other examples) to be some of the most interesting things happening when it comes to pro active treating of healthy patients. A while back I predicted a whole plethora of medical tracking devices are going to hit the market. This is happening and will continue for many years to come. I heard one guy interviewed who talked about one day (many years from now) having little mini processors attached to every nerve or blood cell in our body. Ok, that’s kind of creepy to think about, but personal monitoring of our body is a burgeoning field in healthcare.

Crunching All the Personal Healthcare Device Data
The question once we’re monitoring all of these various vital signs and health information is what are we going to do with that information. Is it reasonable to think that we’ll be able to use computers to crunch through all the data and provide a self service analysis of all the data collected? Yes, Watson did some amazing things on Jeopardy, but I think we’re far away from the day when this type of self service crunching of all the medical data we collect will be possible.

Yes, that means we’re still going to need doctors and other healthcare professionals who help us analyze the data that we’re collecting and dealing with the health issues that are related to that data. In fact, I predict a whole new breed of doctor will come together that will be specialized at analyzing this data and treating even the healthy patients.

Future Healthy Patient Doctor Relationship
This all comes full circle when you go back to the start of this discussion: the doctor patient relationship. How are doctors going to see all this health information we’re collecting? Where are we going to have these healthy patient interactions with doctors? I predict that it will be through patient portals that are connected to a physician’s EHR.

I and every blogger I’ve ever known has been a stats junkie. We’re addicted to checking our stats. There’s no reason we wouldn’t be just as addicted to checking our health stats on a patient portal. The problem is that the patient portals I’ve seen aren’t there yet. Plus, most doctors aren’t yet ready for this type of healthy patient interaction around such a large set of data. Although, I predict we’ll get there and it will change the doctor patient relationship forever.

HIE, ACOs Are the ‘Fast-Moving Train’ of Health Reform

Posted on May 12, 2011 I Written By

Healthcare and health IT are plagued by conundrums. Providers long have been the ones asked to make hefty investments in EMRs and other IT systems to help remove costs from the healthcare system, but payers and plan sponsors tend to enjoy most of the financial benefits. Clinicians wish their organizations would share data with others, but those in the executive suite have been reluctant to cooperate with competitors for fear of losing revenue. And, let’s face it, medical errors can be profitable if a routine procedure turns into an expensive inpatient admission.

Portions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act are intended to address these problems by providing financial incentives for “meaningful use” of EMRs (including health information exchange) and by encouraging the creation of Accountable Care Organizations

I’m just back from the Institute for Health Technology Transformation health IT summit in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where I moderated panels on how health IT underpins ACOs and how business intelligence can create a framework for health information exchange.

The panelists did great job of articulating some of these conundrums and strategies to overcome them, but none better than Kevin Maher, director of clinical innovations for Horizon Healthcare Innovations, a new affiliate of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey tasked with testing new care models, and Victor Freeman, M.D., quality director in the Health Resources and Services Administration‘s Office of Health IT and Quality.

The patient-centered medical home is a great idea for managing care, promoting prevention and, ultimately reducing costs. “We view the base of the ACO as the patient-centered medical home,” Maher said. But what exactly does an ACO look like? “An ACO is like a unicorn,” Maher said. “We can all describe it, but we’ve never seen one.”

He noted that Horizon has started paying some physicians a care coordination fee to manage populations that potentially could add $60,000 or more to a doctor’s annual income. But there are plenty of factors outside a physicians’ control.

“Potentially the No. 1 focal point of a patient-centered medical home or an ACO is patient behavior,” Maher said. A doctor can’t force a patient to exercise more, quit smoking or get a mammogram or PSA test. There’s pay-for-performance for doctors, but what about paying for patient performance?

In January 2012, Horizon will launch a pilot to offer incentives to members who get recommended tests and choose providers that meet the health plan’s quality standards. That’s right, the Blues plan in New Jersey will pay people to go to the doctor and to make informed choices about which doctors they see. (“Everyone says she’s a great doctor” won’t cut it as an informed choice anymore.)

Freeman called the Horizon experiment “P4P that makes sense.”

Let’s just hope the technology can support making the right choices. “People in government get more involved in quality measurement, not necessarily quality,” Freeman said. Incentive programs these days still tend to be more pay-for-reporting than pay-for-quality, and the technology hasn’t fully matured in that area.

“EMRs were designed for billing, not quality reporting,” noted Freeman, who has a background in public and population health. Information often isn’t stored in discrete form, such as with images generated by specialists flagged as being abnormal, so even with HIE, it’s hard for primary care physicians to identify patients who might be candidates for early interventions before they actually exhibit symptoms of a disease.

“My biggest interest in HIE is how clinicians communicate with each other,” Freeman said.

But is the technology ready to help them do so? “HIE now reminds me of what EMRs were five years ago,” said another panelist, Bruce Metz, Ph.D., newly hired senior VP and CIO at the Lahey Clinic in Massachusetts. It’s viewed as an IT project that’s not necessarily linked to a business or clinical strategy. “You can’t force the technology to mature that fast,” he added.

And so the ride continues on what Metz called “a fast-moving train.” Have we even had time to see if the right people are on board?

Doctors and Patients as Customers

Posted on May 11, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m not sure where I came up with the following idea. I had stored it in my list of future posts and I didn’t have any reference for it. So, if I forgot to acknowledge who provided me the comment I’m sorry.

This is the comment that I received from someone, “EMR provides benefits to the patient (better patient care) and payers (cost savings).”

Of course, we could argue these two points until we’re blue in the face. In fact, feel free to argue either point in the comments below. That will be interesting. I’ll just say that there’s the potential for better patient care and the potential for cost savings to the payers. Whether the potential will become a reality will be a fun discussion in the comments.

When I saw the above statement I started to consider the impact of “better patient care” from a doctor’s perspective. Better patient care seems like something that should benefit the doctor. Pretty sad to consider that the customer (patients) getting better service has little effect on a doctor’s business. Certainly there are some hyper competitive markets where this isn’t true. However, I believe that most patients (myself included) aren’t very good (shall I say knowledgeable) enough to be able to distinguish between good patient care and great patient care. Sure, there are outlier cases, but what measures do patient use to distinguish the quality of care their doctor provides?

If you assume the above statement of EMR software providing better patient care (Clinical Decision Support, Drug to Drug and Drug to Allergy interaction checking, etc etc etc), then why as patients (customers) aren’t we asking future doctors if they use these features? Maybe a few people are, but there’s far from an outcry of patients leaving doctors who are refusing to use an EMR.

For some reason this isn’t working:
EMR Use -> Better Patient Care -> Happy Patients -> Better Business for Doctors

I’m sure that some will come and say that it’s just not clear that the EMR benefits to patient care are tangible enough for this “customer demand” to occur. I remember about 5 years ago when on the EMR Update forum someone suggested a “Got EMR?” (similar to Got Milk) ad campaign for doctors to advertise the fact that they had an EMR. So, of course this topic isn’t new. Although, it’s still very relevant.

Although, even beyond EMR, I wonder what a company or website could do to help consumers/customers (patients if you prefer) to better evaluate the quality of healthcare that’s being provided. I don’t have any ideas on this regard. I’m as bad as the next person at figuring it out. However, whenever there’s a lack of good information I think there’s an opportunity. As you’ve probably figured out, I’m all about good information and accountability.

Benefits of EMR Software to Consumers

Posted on May 27, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my readers emailed me about a presentation he was looking at doing about EMR software and consumers. I was really intrigued by the idea of presenting on the benefits of an EMR to the consumer (Translation: Patients). I’d spent quite a bit of time thinking about the benefits of an EMR to doctors, but I hadn’t put as much thought and effort into the benefits of an EMR to patients.

Here’s our initial brainstorm on the benefits of an EMR to patients. Feel free to add to the list in the comments:
-Online Appt Scheduling
-Online Prescription Refills
-Online Patient Information
-Online Forms (possibly pulled in from a PHR)
-e-Visits (this is a controversial one)
-Secure communication with doctor
-Recall/Reminders Electronically
-Patient participation in health record (ie. diet journals)
-Better point of care
-Clinical decision support
-Better access to your health records
-Less errors
-Lower cost
-Better collaboration and communication between primary care and specialty Drs

No doubt some of these benefits should have a ? mark by them. Although, I like the idea of looking at the EMR from the patient perspective. I do after all think that consumers might be the key to “forcing” broad EMR adoption.