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Does Patient Interaction Lock a Doctor In to an EHR?

Posted on March 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about EHR vendor lock in. I think this was prompted by some stories I’ve heard of EHR vendors holding clinics EHR data “hostage” when the clinic chooses to switch EHR software. I heard one case recently that was going to cost the clinic a few hundred thousand dollars to get their EHR data out of their old EHR software. It’s a travesty and an issue that I want to help work to solve this year (more on that in the future).

I think it’s such a failed model for an EHR vendor to try to keep you as their EHR customer by holding your EHR data hostage. There are so many other ways for an EHR vendor to keep you as a customer that it’s such a huge mistake to use EHR data liquidity to keep customers. EHR vendors that choose to do this will likely pay the price long term since doctors love to talk about their EHR with other doctors. If a doctor is locked into an EHR they dislike, then you can be sure that their physician colleagues won’t be selecting that EHR.

There are a whole series of better ways to lock an EHR customer in long term. The best way being providing an amazing EHR product.

I recently considered another way that I think most EHR vendors aren’t using to create a strong relationship with their physician customers. Think about the strength of a company’s relationship with a doctor if a doctor’s patients are all familiar with their connection to the EHR. If a physician-patient interaction occurs regularly through the EHR, then it’s very unlikely that a doctor is going to switch EHR software.

The most obvious patient interaction that occurs is through a patient portal that’s connected to a provider’s EHR. Once a clinic has gotten a large portion of their patients connected to an EHR patient portal, then it makes it really hard for a doctor to consider switching from that EHR. It’s one thing for a doctor to change their workflow because they dislike their EHR. Add in the cost of getting patients to switch from a portal they have been using and I can see many doctors sticking with an EHR because of their patients.

Of course, from a doctor perspective, there’s some value in selecting an EHR that uses a 3rd party patient portal. That way if you choose to switch EHR software, then you can still consider keeping your interaction with patients the same through the same third party patient portal. Although, there’s some advantage to using the patient portal from the EHR vendor as well. It’s not an easy decision.

EHR Backlash, Patient Interaction, Smart Phone Use, and Dell Think Tank

Posted on March 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I realize this first tweet might be controversial for many. Any time you bring a bit of politics (Obamacare in this tweet), there’s a risk of bringing out the crazies. Hopefully we can avoid that, but I was intrigued by this tweet also because it had 17 Retweets by other people. That’s a crazy number of retweets for healthcare IT. I think this view is also part of the EHR backlash that we’ve written about before. Whether you agree with the tweet or not, there are a lot of doctors that feel similar to Dr. Kris Held and they’re starting to make their voice heard.


I love how many people have a focus on increasing patient interaction. An EMR can get you away from it if you’re not careful. The article in this link has some decent suggestions to consider. The most important advice is to be aware of it. Awareness does a lot to improve it.


The killer mobile app in healthcare has been Epocrates and largely is today. A well done EHR mobile app could see similar adoption. Although, there are 300 EHR vendors that aren’t focused on mobile (many of them at least), and so that’s why we don’t hear as much about it.


I’m going to be part of the Dell Healthcare Think Tank that’s mentioned in this tweet. They are doing a live online stream of the event and are even opening it up for questions from Twitter I believe. So, it should be a great opportunity to hear from a lot of smart people on the subject of healthcare IT and to participate online as well. Check it out Tuesday if you want to participate.

Mobile vs Computer and the Patient Interaction

Posted on March 25, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

“It’s Friday, Friday! Gotta get down on Friday. Fun, fun, fun, fun. Looking forward to the weekend.” – Friday Music Video by Rebecca Black Dang those viral videos, but I have to admit that I’m grateful that today is Friday and I have a weekend to catch up on things. I’m sure that many of you can relate to this feeling.

As we head to the weekend, I’ll leave you with a little something to think about and discuss in the comments. Someone at HIMSS pointed this out to me and I thought it was worth sharing. Think about the patient interaction in the exam room. For some reason, doctors don’t and haven’t had any problem pulling out their mobile phone (or previously their PDA) in order to pull up Epocrates (or some other similar app) while in the room with the patient. It was perfectly natural for them to pull it up to look up a certain drug or other information.

Why are doctors comfortable with a smart phone between them and a patient, but a computer is not? Is there a relationship between this and why the iPad is so popular with doctors?