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E-Patient Update: Is It Appropriate to Trash “Dr. Google”?

Posted on August 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Apparently, a lot of professionals have gotten a bit defensive about working with Google-using customers. In fact, when I searched Google recently for the phrase “Don’t confuse your Google search with my” it returned results that finished the phrase with “law degree,” “veterinary degree,” “nursing degree” and even “library degree.” And as you might guess, it also included “medical degree” among its list of professions with a Google grudge.

I first ran across this anti-Dr.-Google sentiment about a year ago, when a physician posted a picture of a coffee mug bearing this slogan on LinkedIn. He defended having the mug on his desk as a joke. But honestly, doc, I don’t think it’s funny. Let me explain.

First, I want to concede a couple of points. Yes, humor means different things to different people, and a joke doesn’t necessarily define a doctor’s character. And to be as fair as possible, I’m sure there are patients who use Web-based materials as an excuse to second-guess medical judgment in ways which are counterproductive and even inappropriate. Knowledge is a good thing, but not everyone has good knowledge filters in place.

That being said, I have, hmmm, perhaps a few questions for clinicians who are amused by this “joke,” including:

  • Wouldn’t people’s health improve if they considered themselves responsible for learning as much as possible about health trends, wellness and/or any conditions they might have?
  • Don’t we want patients to be as engaged as possible when they are talking with their doctors (as well as other clinicians)? And doesn’t that mean being informed about key issues?
  • Does this slogan suggest that patients shouldn’t challenge physicians to explain discrepancies between what they read and what they’re being told?
  • Does this attitude bleed over to a dislike of all consumer-generated health data, even if it’s being generated by an FDA-approved device? If so, have you got a nuanced understanding of these technologies and a well-informed opinion on their merits?

Please understand, I am in no way anti-doctor. The truth is, I trust, admire and rely upon the clinicians who keep my chronic illnesses at bay. I have a sense of the pressures they confront, and have immense respect for their dedication and empathy.

That being said, I need clinicians to collaborate with me and help me learn what I need to know, not discourage and mock my efforts. And I need them to be open to the benefits of new technologies – be they the web-based medical content that didn’t exist when you were in med school, remote monitoring, wearables, sensor-laden t-shirts, mobile apps, artificial intelligence or flying cars.

So, I hope you understand now why I’m offended by that coffee mug. If a doctor dislikes something so elementary as a desire to learn, I doubt we’ll get along.

Patient Education, Records vs People, CareFusion Bought, and HIT Startup Story – Twitter Roundup

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Every once in a while I like to take a tour around Twitter and share some of the interesting tweets I’ve found. Plus, I usually provide a little bit of commentary on each. Here are a few that interested me today.


Quite the imagery indeed. I’ve been fascinated with images lately. You can consume them in a few seconds and it communicates something so quickly.


Lawrence Weed, MD was way ahead of his time. The EHR can easily make us forget about the person if we’re not careful. Reimbursement and MU checkoff lists don’t help either.


Not a bad day to be at CareFusion. Bought by BD for $12.2 Billion. It is interesting that Cardinal Health created it, spun it off and then its competitor bought it. A little too inside baseball for me.


This article is a great read if you’re a health IT startup company. I love Jeff’s description of the black box of healthcare. It’s true that if you try to have them come out of the box and do something different, it’s extremely hard. If you do something that feeds the black box, then they’ll buy it. Sad, but true.

Patient Engagement vs. Patient Education: What’s the Difference?

Posted on June 3, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jamie Verkamp, Chief Speaking Officer at (e)Merge.
Jamie Verkamp
Healthcare organizations often see attesting to the Measures included in Meaningful Use Stage 2 as a burdensome checklist which results in a massive resource drain in exchange for inadequate financial compensation. MU Stage 2 Measure 7 is one such oft-maligned requirement for attestation. This Measure requires that online access to records is provided to 50% of patients and that 5% of patients execute the viewing, download, or transmission of their online health information.  Organizations should not see Measures regarding patient engagement as intimidating or inconvenient. Instead, these Measures seeking to improve patient engagement should be seen as an opportunity to create more loyal, involved, and empowered patients.  The importance of engaging our patients in their own health shows itself in current statistics relating to personal health.  According to a study by TeleVox, roughly 83% of Americans don’t follow treatment plans as prescribed by their physicians.  Adding to that, 42% of Americans feel they would be more likely to follow their care plan if they received some form of motivation to participate.  By giving patients a channel to monitor and participate in their own health, organizations can develop a more educated population capable of producing greater outcomes.

Understanding the reasoning behind the Measures driving patient engagement is the first step; now, we must educate our patient population on the value of logging in and connecting with their information. While the frequency of patients physically visiting their provider’s office is somewhat inconsistent, this is often the most successful way to encourage electronic patient access. Patient facing staff members should be well educated on electronic patient access and be prepared to answer questions as they arise. Physically walking patients through the engagement process of maneuvering their electronic access, or providing video tutorials with simple instructions in the office lobby can increase patient engagement substantially. Consider setting up a station in the waiting room to allow patients to sign up for the service, thus solving the issue of forgotten motivation.

However, organizations must seek to include in their engagement plan the younger and healthier population who may not enter the physical office space outside of unforeseen emergency visits or more often than their annual checkup requires. Looking online to relate with these patients can be beneficial, as this has been found to be where this demographic spends the majority of their time and communication engaging with brands and services.  Providing information and education on an organization’s website, Facebook, Twitter, or even YouTube page through video promotion can assist in sparking an interest with this patient population.  Many times, those likely to engage in a patient engagement offering remain unaware of its availability due to a lack of communication from the healthcare organization.  From the practice standpoint, we must understand our work is not done once the portal is merely completed; rather this is when the real challenge presents itself.

In today’s society, consumers are bombarded with promotional emails and routinely asked for their contact information so further communication can be established.  With this in mind, consumers are more cautious as to what and how much information they provide to companies.  Unfortunately, for the healthcare industry, this includes a cautious nature toward information shared with healthcare organizations.   With this barrier in place, administrators must actively engage with their patients to educate them on the benefits of becoming involved in electronically managing their care.  Before consumers choose to willingly hand over their personal contact information, they will likely need to understand the reasons for doing so and what advantages they will receive.

Convenience has become one of the most desired aspects of communication and buying behaviors in consumers today.  As a society, we have adopted a “need it now” expectation.  With the ease portable technology has brought to our information search, patients and consumers count on service when they desire it.   This is especially true when it comes to customer service; consumers are becoming less patient and beginning to expect service when they desire.  In a recent study, it was found businesses offering a “Live Chat” option online saw a 15% increase in conversions. Explaining to patients the ease of communication with physicians and key staff members through the portal can be a helpful start in creating buy in.  Communication via the portal includes direct messaging, appointment reminders, and more. Informing patients of potential time saving factors in appointments down the road and quicker access to lab results can also establish and pique interest.  In many instances, finding the optimal moment to address the patient portal can create successful outcomes.  Patients burdened by numerous prescription refill requirements or those frustrated with waiting in line to pay a bill can be directed back to the convenience of a patient portal to handle all of these items at their own computer at home.

As a whole, those looking to meet this Stage 2 requirement must focus their attention on creating personalized communication with patients.  Standardized information will not entice patients and may easily be looked over.  Begin to examine which staff members may be the best fit for providing patient education and focus on educating patients on what they will get out of participating, not just simply meeting your Measure 7 requirements.   Potential touch points can be found within your signage, billing communications, appointment reminders and especially on your practice website and social sites.

According to HealthIT.gov, Meaningful Use Stage 3 will continue with the goal of driving patient engagement and improving outcomes.  This will include, “patient access to self-management tools”. The options for healthcare organizations are clear:

1. An organization can meet the bare minimum for the Stage 2 requirements using a patchwork of initiatives which produce minimally satisfying results while have no significant effect on the patient experience. Then repeat the entire process for the applicable Measures in Stage 3.

2. An organization can have a well-articulated and executable plan. In doing so, the practice, hospital or healthcare organization can commit to utilizing technology for the optimization of patient care, get a full return on investment from the Patient Portal, and simultaneously grow their business through the competitive advantage of a successful online presence. Initiating this push now will further develop readiness for Stage 3 as the implementation date approaches and with productive workflows in place, administrators can free themselves to focus on other Measures for attestation.

So which option will your organization choose? It’s not going to be easy, but change seldom is. Every industry experiences social and digital evolution, now it is healthcare’s turn.

About Jamie Verkamp
This article is a result of a partnership between (e)Merge, a medical growth consulting firm and DataFile Technologies, an outsourced medical records management and compliance company. Jamie Verkamp leads (e)Merge as Managing Partner and Chief Speaking Officer, she works shoulder to shoulder with medical professionals the healthcare industry to improve the patient experience and see measurable growth in clients‘ customer service efforts, referral volumes and bottom lines. DataFile Technologies is led by Janine Akers, CEO. DataFile’s passion for compliance allows them to be thought leaders in HIPAA interpretation while executing innovative medical records workflow solutions on behalf of their clients. Our companies produce white papers, speaking engagements, and videos to keep health professionals up to date on the latest industry topics.

Keep It Simple, Stupid!

Posted on February 28, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is CoFounder and CEO of Pristine, a VC backed company based in Austin, TX that builds software for Google Glass for healthcare, life sciences, and industrial environments. Pristine has over 30 healthcare customers. Kyle blogs regularly about business, entrepreneurship, technology, and healthcare at kylesamani.com.

There are an enormous number of startups trying to solve the medication adherence problem. Broadly speaking, these startups are trying to solve the problem through three avenues:

1) Hardware, i.e. smart pill bottles

2) Semi-intelligent software driven reminders

3) Patient education

The most effective solutions are likely to incorporate all three.

The hardware space has been the most interesting simply because of the variety of solutions cropping up. AdhereTech and CleverCap have developed unique pill bottles that control and monitor dispensing via proprietary smart pill bottles. They also incorporate software for notifications. Unfortunately, all smart pill bottle makers are bounded by FDA regulations because they physically control medications through a combination of hardware and software. FDA regulations will slow time rollout of these solutions to market and create enormous new expense.

I recently learned about PillPack, a startup that just raised $4M. They compete asymmetrically in the medication adherence by not making any hardware at all!

The problem with the pill bottle is that there are dozens of pills in a single container. Measuring and controlling output and consumption is intrinsically a difficult problem. PillPack solves these problems by simply averting the issue entirely. PillPack pre-packs pills by dose. This is particularly valuable because they pre-pack multiple kinds of medications that need to be taken at the same time.

PillPack doesn’t yet have any intelligent software that monitors when medications are taken. But with granular packaging, sensing and controlling the medications becomes dramatically easier than ever before. I suspect this will the marquee feature of PillPack 2.0. Once they add the ability to detect when a pack is opened, they can begin adding intelligent software alerts and reminders to patients and their families.

PillPack has a far more lucrative distribution strategy than companies who have to produce and distribute hardware. PillPack can scale their customer base incredibly quickly through B2C marketing. B2C marketing isn’t easy; Pillpack faces a significant challenge in terms of patient and provider education, but it’s one that’s definitely addressable. If PillPack’s service is as good as I think it is, they should develop incredibly happy customers, which will lead to recurring revenues and strong referrals.

The moment I saw Pillpack, I immediately recognized it as one of those “duh” business. We’re going to look back in 10 years and wonder why this wasn’t always around. Their solution solves so many of the pain points around taking medications on time and is coupled with a lucrative business model that feeds off of recurring revenues from long term customers.

The genius of their business is that they are tackling the medication adherence problem from a unique angle: packaging and distribution. They’ve bundled that solution into a simple and elegant package (pun intended) that helps patients avoid the pain of the modern US healthcare system: going to the pharmacy, fighting with the pharmacist, and manually tracking when to take how much of each medication.

Full disclosure: I have no relationship(s) with PillPack.