E-Patient Update: Is It Appropriate to Trash “Dr. Google”?

Posted on August 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Apparently, a lot of professionals have gotten a bit defensive about working with Google-using customers. In fact, when I searched Google recently for the phrase “Don’t confuse your Google search with my” it returned results that finished the phrase with “law degree,” “veterinary degree,” “nursing degree” and even “library degree.” And as you might guess, it also included “medical degree” among its list of professions with a Google grudge.

I first ran across this anti-Dr.-Google sentiment about a year ago, when a physician posted a picture of a coffee mug bearing this slogan on LinkedIn. He defended having the mug on his desk as a joke. But honestly, doc, I don’t think it’s funny. Let me explain.

First, I want to concede a couple of points. Yes, humor means different things to different people, and a joke doesn’t necessarily define a doctor’s character. And to be as fair as possible, I’m sure there are patients who use Web-based materials as an excuse to second-guess medical judgment in ways which are counterproductive and even inappropriate. Knowledge is a good thing, but not everyone has good knowledge filters in place.

That being said, I have, hmmm, perhaps a few questions for clinicians who are amused by this “joke,” including:

  • Wouldn’t people’s health improve if they considered themselves responsible for learning as much as possible about health trends, wellness and/or any conditions they might have?
  • Don’t we want patients to be as engaged as possible when they are talking with their doctors (as well as other clinicians)? And doesn’t that mean being informed about key issues?
  • Does this slogan suggest that patients shouldn’t challenge physicians to explain discrepancies between what they read and what they’re being told?
  • Does this attitude bleed over to a dislike of all consumer-generated health data, even if it’s being generated by an FDA-approved device? If so, have you got a nuanced understanding of these technologies and a well-informed opinion on their merits?

Please understand, I am in no way anti-doctor. The truth is, I trust, admire and rely upon the clinicians who keep my chronic illnesses at bay. I have a sense of the pressures they confront, and have immense respect for their dedication and empathy.

That being said, I need clinicians to collaborate with me and help me learn what I need to know, not discourage and mock my efforts. And I need them to be open to the benefits of new technologies – be they the web-based medical content that didn’t exist when you were in med school, remote monitoring, wearables, sensor-laden t-shirts, mobile apps, artificial intelligence or flying cars.

So, I hope you understand now why I’m offended by that coffee mug. If a doctor dislikes something so elementary as a desire to learn, I doubt we’ll get along.