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Hospital Intern Time, Why ICD10?, and EHR Satisfaction Pre-MU

Posted on April 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Everyone that reads this immediately thinks that this is a terrible thing. It seems ghastly that a doctor that’s paid to treat patients would spend so much time with an EMR vs with patients. I agree with everyone that are highest paid resource should be using as much time as possible with and treating patients. However, this study would have a lot more meaning if it was paired with a previous study that showed how much time a hospital intern spent in a paper chart. Maybe they spent 400% more time with a paper chart than direct patient contact. Then, this stat would come off looking very different. You have to always remember that you have to take into account the previous status quo.


This article and the discussion around ICD-10 was phenomenal. Passionate viewpoints on each side. It fleshed out both sides of the arguments for me really well. Too bad no one will care too much for a while.


Oh…the good old days. When everyone love EHR, because they chose to do it and so they made the most of their choice. Ok, I’m being a little facetious, but I seem to remember a study I saw that showed how much more unsatisfied doctors are with EHR today versus pre-MU. I imagine it’s not all MU’s fault, but it certainly hasn’t helped with physician EHR satisfaction.

Giving Thanks for Healthcare IT – #HITThanks

Posted on November 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always love the creativity that comes out of the good people at HL7 Standards. In the latest example, I reference a post by Jon Mertz called Giving Thanks for Health Information Technology. In the post, he digs into the idea that gratitude is a mindset and suggests that we could use a little more gratitude in healthcare IT.

I love the concept and power of gratitude and appreciate Jon’s comments about the need for more gratitude in healthcare IT. While I try to avoid this, it’s often easier to report on the train wrecks than it is to report on the benefits. Plus, train wrecks drive readership.

Following Jon’s call for us to express more gratitude for the good things happening in healthcare IT, I thought I’d create my list of thanks. Hopefully you’ll join in with your list in the comments, on your blog, or on twitter (see the hashtag #HITThanks).

  • I’m grateful I don’t have to search for lost paper charts.
  • I’m thankful I don’t have coffee stained paper charts.
  • I appreciate that multiple people can add to the chart at the same time (at least in most EHR systems).
  • I’m glad I don’t see stacks of paper charts on my desk.
  • I appreciate being able to read whatever my doctor documents in my chart.
  • I’m thankful for the nurses who do a bang up job with EHR software that’s almost always developed with them as an afterthought.
  • I’m grateful we no longer have to remember that Aq comes after Am and that the person who filed the chart might have been moving quickly and filed Am after Aq.
  • I appreciate all the thousands of thoughtful, caring, and wonderful people that work day in and day out to provide amazing care.
  • I’m thankful a nobody in Las Vegas can start a blog and give back to the healthcare IT community in some way.

I’m sure I could list many more. I hope you’ll join in.

5 EHR Myths Debunked

Posted on October 14, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people at AdvancedMD put out a whitepaper called EHR Myths Debunked: 5 Status Quo Myths that Hold You back and Reduce Your Bottom Line. I love the topic of debunking EHR myths. There are a lot of them out there that are propped up by misinformation. Plus, the EHR world is moving so quickly, it’s hard to keep up with all of the changes which solve the previous issues.

I love a lot of the stats in the whitepaper that they use to debunk the myth. For example, they say that “$42,000 could be wasted annually on paper charts.” This goes with the myth that looks at the financial sense of a paper chart system.

I found the last myth on their list really interesting: “Portability of patient records is a luxury for large practices.” I’d extend this myth to something I’ve heard some people say: “Small practices don’t need to have a portable patient record.” I’ve certainly seen those doctors who don’t want their patient data portable. In their mind they think that if the patient record can’t be accessed from home, then they won’t have to work on it from home. However, this isn’t a reality for most doctors. Ask the doctor who has to drive into their office at midnight to find a patient record if he likes the idea of a EHR software that’s easily accessed from anywhere at any time.

All of this reminds me of my EMR and EHR benefits series. There are so many benefits to EHR that we just take for granted. The EHR Myths whitepaper is a good way to remember many of those benefits.

EMR Profitability, Patient Care Team, and Between EMR and Paper

Posted on June 16, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This is an interesting graph. I’m amazed that the hospitals were willing to give out their operating margin. Of course, some of them are public and so that information is available publicly. It does seem to show a benefit of EMR adoption. Although, I’d also question if those able to adopt EMR were more profitable in the first place. Correlation is not causation.


You have to love Sherry and her passion for the patient involvement in care. Keep on spreading the message Sherry!


I really love The Nerdy Nurse. Not just because she has a cool name (which she does), but also because she writes some great stuff. We need more nurses like her writing about healthcare IT and EMR.

EHR Benefit – Accessibility of Charts

Posted on January 10, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the second installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits. In case you missed the first post, go and check out the EHR benefit of legible notes.

Accessibility of Charts
The second EHR benefit is similar to the Legibility of Notes benefit in that it is easily forgotten as a benefit to EHR and it can be hard to quantify the value of the benefit in dollar amounts. Plus, it is really easy to see how nice accessible charts are to an organization.

There are a number of ways to look at the EHR benefit of accessible charts. The most obvious one is when you think about the number of times a chart has gone missing in a clinic. In most cases, the chart isn’t really missing. It’s in the clinic somewhere, but no one can find it. Remember all those special places that a chart could hide: exam room, physician’s desk, front desk, nurse’s desk, lab sign off box, physician’s car, hospital, physician’s home, etc etc etc. Oh yes, I didn’t even mention HIM not being able to find the chart because someone (probably someone other than HIM) misfiled the paper chart.

I’m sure most HIM people who read this will have a visceral reaction. I’m sure many are likely thinking, “But we do an amazing job keeping track of all those paper charts.” I agree with them 100%. A good HIM person has done an amazing job keeping track of paper charts. It would be 100 times worse if they weren’t there. The problem is that if a dozen people are using the paper chart, the reality is that charts are going to go missing.

Now think about the concept when it comes to EHR. None of those lost chart locations exist. The nurse can’t accidentally take the chart and forget to file it. The doctor can’t forget the chart at home or in his car. No one can misfile the chart.

Think about it. An EHR solves 100% of the problem of missing paper charts.

Besides misplaced paper charts, the idea of chart accessibility is an important one when you consider the idea of accessing an EHR remotely. Even if you use a less than ideal remote desktop solution, a physician can access an EHR anywhere they have an internet connection. For web based EHR, you get exactly the same experience accessing the EHR remotely as you would in the office.

I’ve heard horror stories (at least their pretty horrible to me) of doctors getting late night patient calls which require them to get dressed, go into the office, open the medical records room to access a patient chart. With an EHR, that same workflow has the doctor booting his computer and logging into the EHR. This doesn’t apply to all doctors, but for those that do it’s a dramatic difference.

The biggest fear I’ve heard from doctors in this regard is they often equate chart accessibility with their accessibility. The argument goes that if they can access the chart 24/7, that it also means they have to work 24/7. I think this is a myth that doesn’t match most realities. Just because you had a key to your office and could go and work on paper charts 24/7 doesn’t mean you had to do it. The same is true with remote access to EHR. You choose when is appropriate and important to access and work on the EHR and when not to do so.

The key difference between EHR and paper charts is that when you do want to access a patient’s record remotely you have that option available to you. That doesn’t mean you always have to do so, but it is nice to have that option available.

When talking about EHR accessibility, I think also about the landscape of connected mobile devices (smart phones, tablets, etc). All of these devices are connected to the internet at all times and could provide a doctor access to their EHR almost anywhere in the world. Try doing that with paper.

The problem here is that most EHR don’t do well on mobile devices. Remote desktop from a smart phone or tablet works, but is a pretty terrible user experience. A native mobile app provides a much better experience for users, but we’re still in the early days of EHR mobile app development. As this matures, the accessibility of charts will become an even bigger EHR benefit.

First Hand EMR User Experiences, Slaying the Paper Dragon, and EMR GUIs

Posted on July 1, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time again for a quick look around some of the EHR and Health IT topics being discussed on Twitter. It’s an interesting time for healthcare IT on Twitter. They’ve started accepting nominations for what they’re calling the #HIT100. A number of people have already nominated my @techguy and my @ehrandhit Twitter accounts as a #HIT100 nomination. I’m honored that people would consider me in that group. I’ll be interested to see who ends up making it on the list. Those lists aren’t perfect, but I enjoy them for discovering new people I didn’t know about.

Also, before I go through some tweets, be sure you check out the Around Healthcare Scene post on EMR and EHR.


I love Inga from HIStalk and I love these first person perspectives and comments on EMR software. We need more doctors, practice managers, nurses, etc talking about their experience. Props to Inga for putting that together.


I love the concept of the “paper beast.” Such a perfect description and something that so many people forget about when their planning their EHR implementation. Dealing with the existing and future paper (yes, paperless is a myth) is an absolute must in a good EHR implementation.


This is a topic we’ve discussed many times before. Although, I think we need to keep pointing it out so that physicians take a good hard look at the documentation method of EHR software. There are so many options out there that doctors shouldn’t settle for something less than optimal.

EMR Data Inaccuracies, EMR and Labs, and the Database of Healthcare

Posted on May 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you read this post, I’m probably on a red eye flight to attend Health 2.0 Boston. I’m really excited to attend Health 2.0 Boston. I think Matthew Holt is always interesting and so I hope I get a chance to interview him while I’m there. Plus, I think it’s large enough to bring out some important people, but not so large that you’re overwhelmed and can’t connect with those who attend.

Also, even if you’re just in Boston and not planning to attend Health 2.0 Boston, we’re going to be doing a tweetup on Tuesday evening. I call it the after party. I’m not sure where we’ll do it, but watch @ehrandhit on Twitter and I’ll tweet out the exact time and location for the tweetup. I look forward to seeing all my Boston Healthcare IT friends.

Now, without further ado, some interesting EMR tweets:


The interesting part of the story linked above is that all of the inaccuracies could happen on paper as well.


Reminds me of the announcement that said that physicians order more labs with EHR. I know we implemented the lab cost display in our EHR, and I’m sure that the cheaper tests were ordered, but that was certainly due to the type of clinic that I implemented the feature.


The idea of the internet as a database is very interesting. It’s probably too forward thinking to be really practical today, but we’ll definitely get there. It’s just a question of how quickly. We’re already seeing indications of this. It’s amazing what you can build in a weekend using “internet parts” through powerful APIs.

Note: This post has been a meaningful use free post.

Resistance to Change Will Fuel EHR Adoption

Posted on March 27, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Resistance to change is the number one reason doctors aren’t adopting EHR software. Sure, doctors will often give a lot of other reasons why they’re not adopting EHR software, but in most cases those are just shields for the real reason they don’t ant to adopt EHR software: Change.

Doctors are certainly not unique in this arena. None of us like to change. I’m a creature of habit as much as the rest of us. In fact, I just tweeted yesterday that I need to change my method for writing posts. I know it’s the right thing to do and would make me more productive and probably increase the quality of my posts, but I’m resistant to changing the approach that I’m comfortable doing. Doctors are no different and let’s be clear that documenting in an EHR is different than a paper chart. An EHR implementation requires change.

While resistance to change is the current barrier to EHR adoption, I would also assert that resistance to change is going to be the reason why EHR adoption will become the norm.

I’m sure this will make some of you feel a little uneasy. What we have to realize is that most new doctors coming into the medical profession love technology and can’t imagine having to go find a paper chart. They can type faster than they can write and so they idea of writing in a paper chart would be a big change for them. These doctors are use to only reading typed material. They don’t care to learn how to read physician hieroglyphics. These new doctors don’t see carrying around a device as a burden, but as a normal part of life. Taking that device away is a change for them. They won’t want to change their digital ways in order to live in a paper chart world.

In a story I’ve often related, I saw this first hand when my medical student friend told me he hated his current rotation because they used paper charts. He then went on to say, “I hate paper charts because I can type faster than I can write. And…” The glazed over eyes was when I could see that for him he couldn’t see any justification for using a paper chart. He wasn’t quite sure how to articulate why he didn’t like paper charts, but he just inherently knew that he didn’t.

Time is the great healer. With enough time, the resistance to change will be against those who want a doctor to use a paper chart.

The Disappearing EMR, Patient Built EMR, EMR Competes with Paper, and Healthcare and Data

Posted on March 25, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You should know the drill by now. Each weekend, I go through and list some of the interesting, insightful, entertaining, news-worthy or otherwise notable tweets that I find covering my favorite topics of EMR, EHR and healthcare IT.

I have a feeling a few of these tweets will drive some interesting discussion around EHR. I hope they do since I do enjoy a nice discussion.

First up is a tweet that’s pretty profound to consider when we think about EMR:


I think the EMR has disappeared for a number of clinicians, but not enough. Maybe this supports my comment in a previous post that we hear a lot of stories of failed EMR implementations, but we don’t hear the stories of as many successful EMR implementations. Is that because those EMR that are so successful basically disappear. Reminds me of life where you start to take for granted something that at first was such a game changer.


My first gut reaction to this tweet was the need to link my really old post, “Develop Your Own EMR, Are You Crazy?” Although, this seems like a little bit different situation. I do wonder how many people developing EHR software end up seeing doctors who use that same software. I wonder if they’d have different priorities and/or if they’d take different approaches if their healthcare was the only motivator behind the EHR software they developed.


This one’s a little self congratulatory I admit, but I always love to see people tweeting my posts. Plus, I love to see how they frame what I’ve written. I prefer to look at that post as a look at ways that EHR can still improve, not as an ode to paper or even worse an excuse for doctors to still use paper. If you liked that post, look forward to another post this week in the “Healthcare Spoiled” series.


This is very true. We’re not ready to handle all the healthcare data that’s being produced today, let alone the tsunami of healthcare data that will come. I’m not too concerned though. It means there’s a tremendous opportunity on the horizon for an entrepreneur to do something amazing.

Funny Video Related to the Move to EHR in Healthcare

Posted on March 18, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my post Paper Has Healthcare Spoiled, Joe Frank aptly pointed out this awesome video (embedded below) that provides a really funny take on when books were invented. I know I’ve posted the video before, but not only is it so funny that it’s worth another view, it’s also a perfect corollary to the previous post. In fact, I had this video partially in mind when I wrote the previous post.

For those who haven’t read the previous post, you should. If you have, then enjoy this wonderful video. Those working in healthcare IT will no doubt see some similarities.