NFL Players’ Medical Records Stolen

Posted on June 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’d been meaning to write about this story for a while now, but finally got around to it. In case you missed it, Thousands of NFL players’ medical records were stolen. Here’s a piece of the DeadSpin summary of the incident:

In late April, the NFL recently informed its players, a Skins athletic trainer’s car was broken into. The thief took a backpack, and inside that backpack was a cache of electronic and paper medical records for thousands of players, including NFL Combine attendees from the last 13 years. That would encompass the vast majority of NFL players

The Redskins later issues this statement:

The Washington Redskins can confirm that a theft occurred mid-morning on April 15 in downtown Indianapolis, where a thief broke through the window of an athletic trainer’s locked car. No social security numbers, Protected Health Information (PHI) under HIPAA, or financial information were stolen or are at risk of exposure.

The laptop was password-protected but unencrypted, but we have no reason to believe the laptop password was compromised. The NFL’s electronic medical records system was not impacted.

It’s interesting that the Redskins said that it didn’t include any PHI that would be covered by HIPAA rules and regulations. I was interested in how HIPAA would apply to an NFL team, so I reached out to David Harlow for the answer. David Harlow, Health Blawg writer, offered these insights into whether NFL records are required to comply with HIPAA or not:

These records fall in a gray zone between employment records and health records. Clearly the NFL understands what’s at stake if, as reported, they’ve proactively reached out to the HIPAA police. At least one federal court is on record in a similar case saying, essentially, C’mon, you know you’re a covered entity; get with the program.

Michael Magrath, current Chairman, HIMSS Identity Management Task Force, and Director of Healthcare Business, VASCO Data Security offered this insight into the breach:

This is a clear example that healthcare breaches are not isolated to healthcare organizations. They apply to employers, including the National Football League. Teams secure and protect their playbooks and need to apply that philosophy to securing their players’ medical information.

Laptop thefts are common place and one of the most common entries (310 incidents) on the HHS’ Office of Civil Rights portal listing Breaches Affecting 500 or More Individuals. Encryption is one of the basic requirements to secure a laptop, yet organizations continue to gamble without it and innocent victims can face a lifetime of identity theft and medical identity theft.

Assuming the laptop was Windows based, security can be enhanced by replacing the static Windows password with two-factor authentication in the form of a one-time password. Without the authenticator to generate the one-time password, gaining entry to the laptop will be extremely difficult. By combining encryption and strong authentication to gain entry into the laptop the players and prospects protected health information would not be at risk, all because organizations and members wish to avoid few moments of inconvenience.

This story brings up some important points. First, healthcare is far from the only industry that has issues with breaches and things like stolen or lost laptops. Second, healthcare isn’t the only one that sees the importance of encrypting mobile devices. However, despite the importance, many organizations still aren’t doing so. Third, HIPAA is an interesting law since it only covers PHI and covered entities. HIPAA omnibus expanded that to business associates. However, there are still a bunch of grey areas that aren’t sure if HIPAA applies. Plus, there are a lot of white areas where your health information is stored and HIPAA doesn’t apply.

Long story short, be smart and encrypt your health data no matter where it’s stored. Be careful where you share your health data. Anyone could be breached and HIPAA will only protect you so much (covered entity or not).