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My #HIMSS14 Preview

Posted on February 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ll be heading on my annual pilgrimage to Health IT Mecca (otherwise known as HIMSS14). HIMSS 2014 is taking place in Orlando and I have another jam packed schedule with ~20 confirmed meetings and ~10 possible evening socials. Of course, this doesn’t count any of the sessions I plan to attend or time I’ve set aside to discover what’s in the enormous exhibit hall.

In case you don’t read EMR and EHR (shame on you, but this can be corrected), yesterday I posted Some Frank #HIMSS14 Advice (plus some cool preview pictures of the event). If you’re going to HIMSS, it’s well worth a read. I think it also illustrates how important the people at HIMSS are to me. Maybe that’s why I love Social Media at HIMSS14 so much. In fact, you’ll see in my preview below a great mix of social media and interesting companies.

Now for a preview of some of the things I’m looking forward to at HIMSS 2014 and a few things that caught my eye (Apologies in advance to those things I forgot to mention).

#HealthyHIMSS14
If you check out that link, you’ll see the unofficial HIMSS 14 5k, a HIMSS Dance Meetup, a HIMSS Tennis Meetup and the official Yoga and Wellness Challenge. I love that there’s at least some effort to be healthy and have some fun at HIMSS. Should be some fun events. I’ll be attending the ones that aren’t way too early for a west coast blogger like myself.

Stoltenberg Consulting
I found Stoltenberg Consulting’s idea to ask attendees “What If…” during HIMSS. They’ll be offering the option in their booth, but you can also get started on social media using the hashtag #WhatIf4HIT. I imagine Stoltenberg plans to take those questions and see how they can help solve the problems which makes the idea even better. There are always plenty of people at HIMSS asking What If, but not nearly enough people making those What Ifs a reality.

#SocialMedia and Influence Meetup
This meetup will include the spectacular Cari Mclean and Shahid Shah and I’ll be tagging along as well. This will be a real interactive discussion between all the participants. So, come to the event ready to ask questions, get answers, and share your experiences and viewpoints. I hope that this will be a sliver of a preview of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference I’m organizing in April.

5th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS
Unfortunately, this event has reached capacity (as it does every year). Imagine 200 of the best and brightest in healthcare IT social media in the same room. Everywhere you turn you see an amazing blogger or someone you follow on Twitter. It’s awesome. A big thanks to Stericycle Communication Solutions for sponsoring the event.

Santa Rosa Consulting
Besides always having a great booth at HIMSS, they also offer a full suite of consulting services around all the topics you would expect: ICD-10, meaningful use, BI and analytics, and HIE. Plus, Santa Rosa Consulting’s part of the larger company which owns the HIE company, Sandlot Solutions. They’re announcing a new Sandlot Connect Lite product that serves as an entry-level electronic notification service, providing the first level of information sharing between ambulatory and inpatient healthcare settings as patients are admitted and discharged. You can find them at Booth 5689 and 5783.

#HITsm Meetup
Always fun to meet many of the people you’ve shared tweets with in person at the #HITsm meetup. I hear this year they’re going to do more interacting and meeting and less single stream discussion. This makes me happy. Plus, I hear they have some giveaways this year as well.

Capsule Tech
Props to KNB for holding a Google Plus video hangout HIMSS pre-brief with Capsule Tech. Then, I have to take the props away for them having me hold an embargo until Monday. However, Capsule Tech did provide me some insight that I’d never heard about hospital readmissions. Plus, I found their HIMSS announcement an interesting evolution in their work. Too bad I can’t tell you more. However, I’m hoping to have a post about it up on Hospital EMR and EHR on Monday.

Healthcare Analytics
You won’t have to look for this. In fact, this is a warning that this is going to be the top buzz word at HIMSS14. I don’t think it’s even going to be close. If someone has more time than me, I’d love to know what percentage of HIMSS exhibitors have a Healthcare Analytics package. I bet it’s huge. What does healthcare analytics even mean? I guess that’s why everyone has a package. No one knows what it means and so everyone has something that does “analytics.” I do analytics too, in excel spreadsheets.

Encore Health Resources
Over on Hospital EMR and EHR, I did an interview with Dana Sellers about the new product their launching at HIMSS: Encore Pay for Performance (P4P) Managed Services. You can read the interview for all the details, but I find it really interesting that a consulting company wants to start taking on some of the risk associated with an organization’s P4P program. I’ll be interested to hear attendees response to this approach and how this plays out over time. We’re at the really early stages of P4P. Also, the Encore Pub Nights at HIMSS are always a nice break after a long day as well. Check those out if you haven’t before.

NextGen Giveaways
Everyone likes a nice giveaway (unless you’re press and they don’t like to give stuff to you). I was impressed by the suite of giveaways that NextGen will be doing at HIMSS. The “selfie contest” is a fun one that leverages social media. I love the prize patrol one as well, but I prefer carrying my backpack instead of another bag. Plus, they’re giving out 4 Grand Prize Vacations. I’d personally want the 5 nights in Rome, Italy, but I’m biased since I lived in Italy for 2 years.

I’ll be interested to hear what other giveaways there are at HIMSS. In past years it seemed they weren’t giving as much away. Maybe I was just too busy in meetings. I did hear one vendor is giving out cool portable batteries to charge your cell phones. Those are nice if you don’t have one.

There you go. A few of the interesting things I’m looking forward to participating in and checking out at HIMSS. I’d love to hear what you find interesting and what you’re looking forward to see in the comments.

Full Disclosure: Santa Rosa Consulting and Stoltenberg Consulting both work with Healthcare IT Central posting jobs and sponsoring newsletters.

EMR Market Share

Posted on July 18, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

Editor’s Note: This is the first post on EMR and HIPAA by James Ritchie. James is a longtime journalist including the past eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier.

Practice Fusion announced in June that it led the EMR industry in market-share gains.

Citing SK&A reports, the San Francisco-based firm boasted that it controlled 5.8 percent of the market as of May, up from 3.8 percent in July 2012. Beyond Practice Fusion, only Epic, AthenaHealth and Cerner showed gains.

In this data, which represents physician offices only, Allscripts was the market leader, with a 10.6 percent share. Not far behind were eClinicalWorks, with a 10.5 percent share, and Epic, with 10.3 percent. (The report that Practice Fusion links to is actually dated January 2013.)

But there’s more than one way to look at the EMR share picture.

Epic was the clear winner in a report by the Austin, Texas-based consultancy Software Advice on meaningful use attestations. Epic, based in Verona, Wis., accounted for 20.3 percent of attestations for a complete EHR in an ambulatory setting.

The firm’s competitors were nowhere close as of the March 2013 report. Allscripts was the system of choice for 11.6 percent of attestations by eligible professionals, and eClinicalWorks accounted for 8 percent. Next on the list were NextGen Healthcare, GE Healthcare and, with 2.7 percent share, Practice Fusion.

Software Advice claimed that the figures, based on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data, might be the best around. They at least provide a standard in a market where vendors “use varied criteria to calculate their customer base,” according to the company.

Companies “might count number of users (which could include everyone from physicians to administrative staff), number of medical providers (which could include everyone from physicians to midwives) or number of practices,” Software Advice noted on its website.

Practice Fusion, founded in 2005, claimed in its press release to have doubled both its monthly active user base of medical professionals and its patient population between 2012 and 2013. The company claims to reach “a community of 150,000 medical professionals serving 65 million patients.”

The prospects for the free model that Practice Fusion uses are still up in the air. Doctors might question whether they want ads, unobtrusive as they are at the bottom of the screen, to compete for their attention when they’re entering patient data. Data, by the way, might prove to be the real revenue generator for Practice Fusion. In June the firm launched Insight, an analytics product offering a population-level view of diagnoses, prescribing patterns and other information. It’s a model worth watching. If Facebook and google can build businesses on data, maybe Practice Fusion can, too.

The SK&A figures show just how fragmented the outpatient EMR/EHR market is. The top 10 vendors accounted for only 64.8 percent of attestations, leaving about 35 percent of the market to the “other” category. By Software Advice’s count, 560 firms logged at least one meaningful use attestation.

Eager to steal share are firms like Irvine, Calif.-based Kareo Inc. It launched its own free, cloud-based EHR in February based on technology acquired from San Mateo, Calif.-based Epocrates Inc. The firm reported in June that 4,000 providers had signed on, with a third of them moving from another EHR.

Of course, ambulatory adoption is only part of the EMR story.

Epic is No. 1 among the nearly 3,000 hospitals that have received federal incentives for using complete electronic records systems, according to Modern Healthcare. The company holds a 19.6 percent share, followed by Computer Programs and Systems Inc. with 15.5 percent, Meditech with 14.1 percent and Cerner with 11 percent. The late-May report was based on numbers from CMS and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.

The inpatient market is far less fragmented than the outpatient space. The top 10 companies control 92 percent of share, according to the report.

No matter how you count share, the EMR space will continue to be hypercompetitive because of the dollars at stake. The market amounted to $20.7 billion in 2012, up 15 percent from 2011, according to the research firm Kalorama Information.

Meaningful Use EHR Breakout by Percentage

Posted on June 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve seen a bunch of different websites listing the top 10 EHR vendors based on physicians who attested to meaningful use using their EHR software. This list is certainly interesting and worthy of a discussion. However, I think it’s also important to put these numbers in some context. Remember that these numbers are just for the ambulatory EHR space. The Hospital EHR numbers are a different story which I’ll probably cover on Hospital EMR and EHR.

Here are the EHR incentive numbers by EHR vendor and also the percentage of meaningful use attestations they had (Thanks to Dr. Rowley for the numbers):

EHR Vendor MU Attestations Percentage
Epic 11075 23%
Allscripts 5743 12%
eCW 4057 8%
NextGen 2237 5%
GE 2002 4%
Athena 1733 4%
Greenway 1650 3%
Cerner 1375 3%
MEDENT (Previously Community Computer Service) 1264 3%
e-MDs 1235 3%
Practice Fusion 1156 2%
Sage 1140 2%
Other EHRs (272) 14358 29%

As Dr. Rowley points out in his post, Epic is the largest vendor on the list, but they don’t market or sale their product to independent clinics or even independent physician groups. Epic’s ambulatory EHR is found in owned or affiliated clinics who use the ambulatory piece of the EHR an Epic hospital buys. So, the above Epic number actually provides an insight into how many ambulatory practices are associated with Epic using hospitals.

The numbers tell an interesting story if you take Epic out of the mix:

EHR Vendor MU Attestations Percentage
Allscripts 5743 15%
eCW 4057 11%
NextGen 2237 6%
GE 2002 5%
Athena 1733 5%
Greenway 1650 4%
Cerner 1375 4%
MEDENT (Previously Community Computer Service) 1264 3%
e-MDs 1235 3%
Practice Fusion 1156 3%
Sage 1140 3%
Other EHRs (272) 14358 38%

Once you take out the hospital dominance in the ambulatory market, the EHR market share for any one EHR vendor is quite small. In fact, the other EHR vendor category has 38% of the EHR market. The long tail of EHR software is definitely at play right now.

Plus, we have to be really careful using meaningful use attestation as a proxy for the EHR market. I recently saw a figure that only 20% of the ambulatory EHR market had attested to meaningful use. That’s right, the above numbers only represent 20% of the ambulatory market.

If my math is correct, that still leaves almost 200,000 providers that aren’t represented in the above analysis of 50k providers. Imagine an EHR vendor comes along that’s so great that they quickly capture only 20% of the 200,000 uncounted providers (no small feat). That would give them about 40,000 providers and using the above numbers they would have 45% of the EHR market (including Epic).

Of course, the current EHR vendors will continue to sale EHR software and many will switch EHR software vendors during that time as well. Plus, no doubt many of those who haven’t attested to meaningful use already have an EHR, but aren’t represented in the numbers above. They just either don’t care about meaningful use and EHR incentive money or they’re still working to get to the point where they can attest to meaningful use. However, I still think the above numbers illustrate that there’s plenty of opportunity available for an upstart EHR company to get plenty of EHR market share.

It’s going to be an exciting next couple years as we watch all of this shake out. We’ll take a look back at this post in a few years to see how far we’ve come.

AI (Artificial Intelligence) in EMR Software

Posted on December 2, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I had an interesting conversation with MEDENT. It’s an EHR company that’s in only 8 states. I could actually write a whole post on just their approach to EMR software and the EMR market in general. They take a pretty unique approach to the market. They’ve exercised some restraint in their approach that I haven’t seen from many other EHR vendors. I’ll be interested to see how that plays out for them.

Their market approach aside, I was really intrigued by their approach to dealing with ICD-10. They actually described their approach to ICD-10 similar to how Google handled search. There’s all this information out there (or you could say all these new codes) and so they wanted to build a simple interface that would be able to easily and naturally filter the information (or codes in this case). A unique way of looking at the challenge of so many new ICD-10 codes.

However, that was just the base use case, but didn’t include what I consider applying AI (Artificial Intelligence) to really improve a user interface. The simple example they gave had to do with collecting data from their users about which things they typed and which codes they actually selected. This real time feedback is then added to the algorithm to improve how quickly you can get to the code you’re actually trying to find.

One interesting thing about incorporating this feedback from actual user experiences is that you could even create a customized personal experience in the EMR. In fact, that’s basically what Google has done with search with their search personalization (ie. when you’re logged in it knows your search history and details so it can personalize the search results for you). Although, when you start personalizing, you still have to make sure that the out of box experience is good. Plus, in healthcare you could do some great personalization around specialties as well that could be really beneficial.

I’d heard something similar from NextGen at the user group meeting applied to coding. The idea of tracking user behavior and incorporating those behaviors into the intelligence of the EMR is a fascinating subject to me. I just wonder how many other places in an EMR these same principles can apply.

I see these types of movements as part of the larger move to “Smart EMR Software.”

Conflicting Indications of the Move to SaaS Based EHR

Posted on November 29, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the really interesting things I noted while attending the NextGen user group meeting had to do with the move to SaaS based EHR and other SaaS based EHR software. I partially mentioned this in the write up I did at the conference, including a tweet where I talk about how Scott Decker really pushed the idea of NextGen making the move into the SaaS based software world.

I think there’s little doubt that NextGen sees the value of SaaS based software. I think they see the convenience to doctors of not having to manage a server. Most importantly, I think they see the value of not having the healthcare data stored in EHR in silos.

One thing that Scott Decker mentioned in his keynote was improving their coding rules engine based on the feedback and experience across all of their SaaS based EHR users. I found this really intriguing since it highlighted some of the challenges and limitations of the client server EHR model that’s so prevalent in healthcare.

After hearing these comments about NextGen’s move towards more and more SaaS based software, I wondered what users at the meeting thought about the move by NextGen to SaaS EHR. The nice part of a user group meeting is I had a chance to talk to a number of them.

One company I talked to said basically, “We have 30 Citrix servers in our NextGen EHR installation. That’s a huge investment we’ve made and I don’t see us changing that any time soon.” They’ve got an interesting point. There’s a lot of money invested in training, equipment, software, and general understanding of the current client server EHR installs that NextGen employs (or is it employed?) for its large EHR customers.

It’s quite a stark contrast to consider this entrenched client server user base that is unlikely to change even if NextGen’s direction is headed towards SaaS EHR software. To be completely honest, I’m not exactly sure how this “conflict” is going to play out.

Family Practice Clinic Demonstrates Meaningful Use and Receives Maximum Medicare Incentive – EMR and EHR Interview

Posted on June 17, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is the second in a series of EMR and EHR interviews that will be done on EMR and HIPAA and EMR and EHR. The full EMR interview with Dr. Muir can be found on the new EHR and EMR interviews website. The following is a summary of that interview written by Kathy Bongiovi.

If you’re a doctor, nurse, practice manager, EHR consultant, CEO or executive of an EHR vendor, etc with EMR experience that’s interested in being interviewed, let us know on our http://www.emrandehr.com/contact-us/“>Contact Us page.

Dr. Peter Muir of Springfield Center for Family Medicine was interviewed recently concerning his acquisition of the maximum Medicare Incentive for showing Meaningful Use of a Certified EHR. The Ohio based primary care practice has been using NextGen Ambulatory since 2003 and NextGen Management since 2006.

Dr. Muir stated that their practice chose NextGen EHR because the company focused on clinical offices. Dr. Muir and NextGen EHR share the philosophy of always searching for ways to improve the product. Dr. Muir not only believes in this philosophy but also attended a development think tank along these lines at NextGen’s headquarters. He was also drawn to NextGen because he wanted the capability of customizing his templates.

Having demographics, scheduling, clinical and billing information all on one database has had a huge impact on Muir’s practice. He feels that having a centralized database “makes reporting much easier and more comprehensive than those EHRs with separate databases or separate vendors”. The doctor admitted the conversion from paper charts to EHR was stressful for the first year but well worth it in the long run.

Since Muir’s office has been using EHRs (since 2003), there have been relatively few changes needed for Meaningful Use and any required upgrades to the system came as part of the standard NextGen maintenance fees. There was data that had to be added which was not normally collected by his practice as it had little relevance to his patients but from the patients’ perspective, there was no change in the attention patients received from Springfield Center.

The family practitioner Muir credits the CMS web site and NextGen Healthcare for not only the upgrades to their EHR software but also for their pathway documents and webinars which helped them show meaningful use. He also credits GBS of Youngstown, Ohio (his NextGen vendor for hardware, software) who also helped them implement security upgrades in 2010 in anticipation of the process.

Additionally, being a part of the ONC Meaningful Use Vanguard Program was a benefit to Dr. Muir because “it provides recognition which may allow a greater input in system design and operation.” Muir is concerned, though, that the Program’s flow of information may be difficult if multiple database silos remain in service and a lack of standardization isn’t addressed.

Especially with respect to Meaningful Use Stages 2 and 3, the doctor believes it is critical to have professional health providers utilizing some form of regional system – versus individual systems – in order to have a seamless flow of information. Muir has begun such a system within his own state of Ohio.

The doctor was intricately involved in starting CCHIE (Collaborating Communities Health Information Exchange) in Springfield, Ohio. CCHIE chose HealthBridge as their data engine and together they have partnered with other healthcare providers to provide electronic access to patients’ lab and radiology results as well as to admissions, discharges and transfer information. They have added regions in Southern Indiana and two regions in Northern Kentucky.

Dr. Muir’s advice to fellow doctors is that unless they are planning to retire within the next couple of years they should not delay in the implementation of an EHR. The longer they wait, the more difficult and time consuming the transition will be because, with time, the activities of daily practice will be much broader and more demanding. Additionally, he suggests providers select a system that does not just meet Meaningful Use requirements. His advice is to “select a system that assists you in providing better medical care”.

Read the full transcript of Dr. Muir’s interview.

Existing EHR Vendors with CCHIT Certification

Posted on September 13, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I mentioned in my previous post about the race to be the first EHR certified (and the first ATCB to certify an EHR), there’s a lot more going on in the battle amongst the EHR certifying bodies.

The first interesting detail surrounds the previous CCHIT certified EHR vendors. This turns out to be a really great move by CCHIT. A quick look at CCHIT’s website has 49 EHR products (or modules of products) that have been certified for either the CCHIT 2011 certification or for the Preliminary ARRA certification. That’s 49 pieces of EMR software (a few less since some are different versions of the same product) have paid $22k+ in order to be certified by CCHIT.

I’ve talked to one of these EHR vendors and they said that CCHIT did a call with all current vendors and said that they will be honoring their previous commitment to provide the real ARRA certification at no additional cost to these providers. This turns out to be really smart if it means that many of the big EHR players like GE, Elipsys/Allscripts, NextGen, Epic, Athena, Pulse, Cerner, etc all decide to continue forward with CCHIT.

Many would ask why they would pay another $20k to someone like Drummond Group if they could get the EHR certification for free from CCHIT. Turns out their is a possibility if CCHIT isn’t able to deliver their certification in a timely manner and Drummond Group is able to do it much quicker.

Remember the list above are HUGE EHR vendors where $20k is basically a drop in the bucket. It’s kind of scary to consider that, but that’s the reality for most of the EHR vendors. Sure, it’s not what they’d like to spend if they don’t have to, but when did large corporations start worrying about wasteful spending? Ok, that might be a slight exaggeration, but you get the point.

The good thing for Drummond Group is that there are still 300+ EMR vendors that will need to be certified. In fact, many of the non CCHIT certified EHR companies are likely moving to Drummond Group for EHR certification since CCHIT is giving priority to their existing EHR vendors.

Yes, that’s right. Over the next month and half CCHIT will spend all its time doing a bunch of free EHR certifications while Drummond Group will be making just under $20k for each EHR certification that they do.

One final thought about the fun that is EHR certification. When I recently talked to an EHR vendor that is CCHIT certified and will likely be getting their now free EHR certification, I found it really interesting to learn who from their company was on the CCHIT call. In this case, the EHR vendor’s VP of Marketing was on the call with CCHIT.

Of course, this begs the question why the VP of Marketing would be on a call about EHR certification standards and compliance. Shouldn’t the clinical director be the one that wants to be on that call? I think it sends a compelling message that I’ve been preaching on EMR and HIPAA for a long time. EHR certification is not a benefit to the doctor. EHR certification is not a benefit to the patient. EHR certification is a means for EHR vendors to market their EHR software.

EMR and HIPAA Advertising Opportunities and New EMR Advertiser

Posted on October 9, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m excited to welcome a new advertiser to the EMR and HIPAA family and suggest some options for advertising on EMR and HIPAA. As you can imagine with the increase in interest in EMR, more and more people have been reading this website which is extremely gratifying to me. Not only are the conversations in the comments enhanced, but it’s nice to be able to share my viewpoints and experience with more people.

So, I’d like to welcome our latest advertiser:
NextGen EMR – They are a quite large EMR vendor and a major player in the EMR world. I’m glad to have them on board. They are doing a EHR and Practice Management live demonstration on 10/20. Check here for more details.

One of my other advertisers also asked me to put together a list of possible advertising opportunities that I had available for them in the coming year. I thought that others might be interested in some of the ideas I sent them:
Advertising on EMR and HIPAA – Check out all the details of advertising on EMR and HIPAA.
Advertising on EMR and EHR – This is a relatively new site I’ve started which currently tries to highlight some of the various EMR and EHR related news items along with covering things that I don’t have time to cover on EMR and HIPAA. The ads work the same on this site as EMR and HIPAA, but at a much reduced rate.
Advertising on my EMR and Healthcare IT focused twitter account – This Twitter account has 2400+ followers and will likely have about 3000 followers by the end of the year and is a highly focused group of people interested in EMR and healthcare IT. This advertising could be in the form of the background of my twitter profile page or through a number of tweets advertising your company over a certain period. I would plan on disclosing that it was an ad using something like a “#sponsor” tag (or something similar).
HIMSS Conference Coverage Sponsorship – I’m planning to attend this year’s HIMSS annual conference and blog extensively about it. This will likely include video interviews of those I meet at the conference. The idea would be to have a few companies sponsor all of my posts from that conference. So, at the end of each post I would write, this post brought to you by “insert company name”. Something to that effect.
Advertising on the EMR, EHR and HIPAA wiki – This is a rather new website that’s just starting to grow, but has provided some pretty good click throughs for EMR and HIPAA.
EMR Related Book Sponsorship – This is still in the process of being created, but my plan is to create a number of e-Books and likely all together a physical book related to EMR selection and implementation. I’d consider having a section for sponsors of the book.
EMR Conference – This is still in development as well, but I’m considering the possibilities of hosting an EMR conference in Las Vegas and sponsors would help keep the costs low.

I’d love to hear feedback on these various options. Let me know if you have any other questions or need more information on our Contact Us page.

EHR Money Back Guarantee Program

Posted on April 7, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Selection of EHR software has definitely slowed. I predicted EHR adoption would slow back in February and I’ve definitely seen the selection process slowing. One of the main reasons people are waiting to adopt is they want to know what’s going to be defined as a “certified EHR” and “meaningful use.”

In order to combat this slow down in EHR purchases, we knew it was only a matter of time until EHR vendors started promising to support whatever is required to become a “certified EHR.” The first one I found with an EHR guarantee was NextGen. Here’s a summary of their commitment:

  • A solution that will always evolve to meet the standards and certifications for federal stimulus reimbursement programs of interest to physicians using NextGen Healthcare products.
  • A solution that uses open standards and enables generally seamless communication across the healthcare community.
  • A fully-functional solution, and swift and professional implementation.
  • Top quality training and support.

This is a really smart business move. They’ve got to do something to keep making sales. However, I’m a little concerned by anyone who selects an EHR based on this commitment. I must admit that I don’t see any reason why NextGen won’t do everything in its power to become a certified EHR. It would be detrimental to their sales staff if they don’t. However, don’t be surprised if a lot of doctors don’t get swallowed up in the wake of misunderstanding.

To illustrate what I mean, take a look through the above commitments and tell me one of them that can be easily defined and measured. Whenever there’s ambiguity involved, the lawyers in the room start to salivate. However, how many doctors offices are really going to spend the time and money involved in enforcing this guarantee? Very few if any. They’ll spend as much on lawyers as they will on recovered damages.

Sadly, the above seems like a better mission or vision for an EHR company than it sounds as a guarantee. If any EHR company really meant this stuff, they wouldn’t need to make a guarantee. All people would need to do is talk to previous customers and the writing would be all over the wall.

Moral of the Story: Select an EHR because it’s the right software for you as a clinic. Don’t base EHR selection on EHR stimulus money or some guarantee.

EHR Vendors Join Twitter

Posted on March 21, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently posted about CCHIT joining Twitter. Seems like a decent number of EMR and HIPAA readers are also on Twitter, because I’ve been getting a pretty good number of new followers in the HIT and EMR field.

As my 1423 followers and 2302 updates prove, I like Twitter a lot and really enjoy the way it can help people to connect (I’m techguy if you want to follow me). It’s really quite amazing how 140 characters could turn out to be so valuable and to a wide variety of markets too.

What was really interesting is I recently saw 2 EMR companies join the Twitter revolution: eMDs and NextGen. I think that it’s really smart for an EMR company to join the conversation. At least if it’s done right. So far they only have 8 tweets and 41 tweets respectively. It will be interesting to see how these 2 EMR vendors use twitter over time.

I tweeted one of these companies the following tweet, “How do you plan on using Twitter? Do you have a plan or are you just testing the waters?”

Their response was, “We’re just getting started, but hope to expand communication w/ customers & others in the industry & connect w/ the EHR community”

One thing is certain, we’re just seeing the beginning of what’s possible with Twitter. It’s going to be really fun to see what creative people are able to do with twitter and healthcare.

If you know of other EHR vendors or other important HIT people on twitter, please let me know in the comments.