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Meaningful Use EHR Adoption Charts – EHR Market Analysis

Posted on June 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ONC continues to push out more data when it comes to meaningful use, EHR adoption, RECs, and related areas. As a data addict, I could spend forever looking through and analyzing this data. So, I’ll probably do a series of posts across Healthcare Scene over the next couple weeks looking at the charts and data that ONC has made public about meaningful use and EHR adoption. I know some of the charts have been out for a while, but the analysis should still prove useful.

If you want to join in on the analysis of this data, I welcome you in the comments of each post. Plus, if you want to find your own nuggets to share, I’d suggest starting with their quick stats and dashboards pages.

First up in our look at the ONC EHR data is a look at the meaningful use participation chart for ambulatory EHR vendors (eligible providers if you prefer):
Ambulatory Practice EHR Adoption - Meaningful Use Participation
The most important part of this chart to me is that the two largest bars on the chart. The largest bar is the 749 “Other EHR Vendors” category at the bottom of the chart. It’s easy to miss this bar, but I believe it’s extremely important to note how big the long tail is when it comes to ambulatory EHR adoption. I’ve often said that it doesn’t take that many doctors to make yourself a decent EHR business. This chart illustrates how many EHR vendors are still in the game. There are only 3 EHR vendors that have over 40,000 providers. I know that many think that EHR vendor consolidation is bound to happen. Some certainly will, but I don’t see it happening at a massive scale in the ambulatory EHR world.

The second largest bar on the chart is the Epic EHR adoption. What’s important about this bar is that this totally represents that hospital owned ambulatory EHR adoption. Epic does not and will not sell Epic directly to a small ambulatory provider. All of these “eligible providers” for Epic are in hospital systems. I take away two important things from this. First, we see in plain sight how big the roll up of ambulatory practices is by hospitals. Second, this chart illustrates the opportunity that Cerner and Meditech have available to them. As you’ll see in the next chart, Cerner and Meditech have more hospital installs than Epic, but they’re much farther down on the ambulatory side. A look at history explains why they’ve had trouble penetrating the ambulatory market, but I believe it’s a huge opportunity for them going forward.

I’ll be interested to see how this chart continues to evolve over time. Will we doctors leaving hospitals to go back on their own shift the balance of power? Will we see massive EHR consolidation? I also can’t help but note that Mitochon Systems Inc shows up on the list and they don’t even sell an EHR to doctors directly any more. I assume this must be their white label business? I’ll have to follow up with them to get an update on their business.

Now let’s take a look at the chart for Hospital EHR vendors participating in the EHR incentive programs:
Hospital EHR Adoption - Meaningful Use Participation
This chart illustrates really well the 3 horse hospital EHR race which we’ve all known for a while. Although, given healthcare IT’s love affair with Epic (kind of like Apple in the IT world), I think some will be a bit surprised that Cerner and MEDITECH are both listed ahead of Epic. If you looked only at large hospital systems, I think the chart would look very different though.

It’s worth also mentioning the other horses in the race: McKesson, CPSI, MEDHOST, Healthland and Allscripts. They’ve all carved out their niche in the hospital space. We’ll see if they can continue to defend their territory. Hospital EHR switching is not easy.

My favorite observation from this chart versus the ambulatory chart is how well it illustrates the importance of secondary EHR vendors (the brownish gold color) in hospitals. I’ll never forget when Alan Portela of Airstrip told me that the EHR world will be a heterogenous environment. That absolutely resonated with me and this chart proves out what he said. Health systems are going to have multiple EHR vendors even if some EHR vendors would like it to be otherwise.

If you want to look at the potential disruptors in the world of EHR, I’d take a look at these secondary EHR vendors. Their foothold in hospitals provides them a really great opportunity to disrupt the status quo as we know it. Most of them won’t, but they’re all sitting on an opportunity. I’d start with the companies that make up the “Other Vendors” brownish gold bar. I bet there are some really interesting ones in that list.

I’d love to hear your observations from these charts in the comments. Anything I missed? Do you disagree with my observations? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

New Media Meetup at MGMA 2011 #HITsm

Posted on October 7, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Following on the extremely successful New Media Meetups we’ve held at HIMSS, we decided to do a similar New Media Meetup at MGMA 2011. This time I decided to join up with the great people at HITECH Answers to put the meetup together. Plus, Free EHR vendor, Mitochon Systems, has graciously offered to sponsor the event along with providing the food and drinks.

In case, you’ve missed the previous New Media Meetups we’ve done, this is an event for anyone that participates in new media, is interested in new media, reads new media or just likes hanging out with a bunch of cool people. Yes, that pretty much means that everyone is welcome. Just don’t be surprised if you see people taking pictures and tweeting while at the event.

There’s no specific agenda for the event. Just great networking with interesting people. So, come enjoy some food, drinks and connect with interesting colleagues.

Here are the details for the event:
When: Tuesday, Oct. 25 from 5 – 7 pm
Where: Suite 2169 at Hilton Hotel (right next to Conv Ctr)
RSVP:
Fill out the form embedded below so we know how many to expect:

Or Complete this form to RSVP

About Mitochon Systems
Mitochon’s mEMR system is the first, free, fully certified EHR system. Mitochon uses a free, ad-supported model. Ads are displayed within the workflow of the application. The Mitochon mEMR system, designed by physicians for physicians, is intuitive and easy to install. Most customers are up and running in one day. Mitochon Systems was founded in 2006 by André Vovan, MD, MBA, FCCM, the director of a critical care department at a large California hospital. Information: 877-817-0902 or http://mitochonsystems.com/.

Event hosted by HITECH Answers and HealthcareScene.com

Best Description of the CareCloud EHR Platform

Posted on August 31, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a post on EMR and EHR about Social Media and EMRs, Andre Vovan, MD MBA from Mitochon Systems offered an interesting insight into the comparison between EMR and social media.

Social media and EMR are a natural fit. Think about what social media really enables. The ablity to stay connected, following different strings of info/story weaved by connected people. Say for instance you and your friends went to the Grand Canyon, one person took pictures while the other did the cooking, planning, and was responsible for entertainment during the trip. When they try to retell the story to their friends, each will be able to add different aspect of the story and with social network platforms such as facebook, this is possible.

Now take the story above, and insert 2 doctors and change the trip taken to be a patient going from a diagnosis to a surgery and afterwards trying to tell other physician providers on went on. If we design the EHR with this capability, then medicine will be improved.
A social media version of electronic medical records would have EMHR, HIE and PHR as one product not as separate.

I know that this was actually Andre’s initial vision for Mitochon Systems EHR. He wanted to create an EHR that could bring a healthcare community together in this way. I’m sure he’ll keep grinding away until he can achieve that vision. I haven’t looked at the Mitochon Systems EHR recently, so I can’t say how close they are to achieving that dream, but when I read Andre’s description I couldn’t help but remember the demo of the CareCloud EHR platform.

Many of you might remember my previous (some might call scathing) post about the CareCloud EHR and an opposing view by David about the CareCloud EHR. That post and a recent trip to San Francisco made it possible for me to see the CareCloud EHR first hand.

I had a great time meeting with Albert Santalo and Mike Cuesta from CareCloud. That was good considering my previous devil’s advocate post about CareCloud. One thing is absolutely certain, Albert has a vision of what he wants CareCloud to be and he’s dead set on achieving that vision. I like that in a CEO and founder of a company.

When it comes to their EHR, I must admit that it kind of reminded me of a lot of other EHR out there. There were a few EMR subtleties that I noticed in the demo, but I can’t say I saw any real wow features that made it a must have EHR. Maybe a full demo and experience with the EHR would create a rainbow of EMR subtleties that would change my mind, but it was a relatively short demo.

Instead, the wow factor wasn’t in the EHR software, but was instead in the CareCloud platform that powers the EHR, PMS and CareCloud Community of users. The description above about an almost “social network of doctors” and the health stream of a patient seems like an apt description of what CareCloud has created. In fact, the social elements of the platform are integrated throughout all of the CareCloud software which makes for some really interesting possibilities.

The challenge that CareCloud has is that a social network or Care Platform if you prefer is only as good as the people and organizations that use that platform. If two doctors are seeing a patient, then both doctors need to be on the same platform to really see a lot of the benefits of a patient’s health stream.

I imagine this is part of the reason why CareCloud has to provide a solid PMS and EHR solution on top of the CareCloud platform. Doing so will seed the platform with users so that with each PMS/EHR sold the platform becomes that much more valuable.

It’s hard to predict the future. Maybe CareCloud won’t get outside of its Miami base and maybe they won’t reach their vision of a CareCloud platform (Maybe Andre and Mitochon Systems or some other HIT vendor will do it instead). However, I’m willing to predict that whether CareCloud wins the healthcare platform war or not, some company will create a healthcare platform like what CareCloud has started to create that will be too valuable not to participate.

Full Disclosure: Mitochon Systems is an advertiser on this site, but they didn’t know I was going to post Andre’s comment.

The Risk of Free EHR Starting to Cost

Posted on May 10, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been writing about Free EHR since I first started this blog in 2005. Initially I was mostly writing about the “free” open source EHR model like I did in this Open Source in Healthcare post in 2006. I still remember when I found out about Free EHR vendor Practice Fusion and wrote this post in 2008 about Free EHR Software and Some of the Hidden Costs. I think it’s fair to say that I was a bit more skeptical of the Free EHR model then than I am now. Practice Fusion and Mitochon Systems are both Free EHR vendors that advertise on this site (Full Disclosure). So, I’ve had a chance to talk at length with both companies. I must admit that the more I talk with them, the more intrigued I am with the Free EHR model.

However, there are still challenges that are faced by the Free EHR model. This struck home quite strongly when I saw the relatively recent news about Free accounting software vendor, Outright, changing from a free model to a paid model. Funny thing is that I was really close to using Outright for my accounting, but then opted to go instead for the Free open source software Gnucash. However, this change in direction made me pause and wonder what would happen if a Free EHR vendor chose to switch from the free model to a paid model.

No doubt that any change in Free EHR business model would likely be similar to Outright where they provide a fair amount of time for users to remain on the free model. They’d also have to provide some way to get your data out of the EHR or else their paid model would not likely survive. The bad will that would be created from holding the practice’s data for “ransom” would be terrible for a company. Although, switching from a free EHR model to a paid one would be even more detrimental I think.

Of course, the EHR company could easily argue that at some point they’re faced with only a couple options: close the company or switch from the free to a paid EHR model. Faced with those options, would you rather have your EHR company go under or be able to pay them for the services you’re receiving? Although, as I’ve discussed in other Free EHR posts, just closing the company down completely wouldn’t likely be an option. Instead, the company would instead be acquired for some discounted rate by another EHR vendor. So, the real options would be to switch EHR companies since the acquiring company would likely want you to switch to their EHR or start paying for the EHR services. I think in most cases, EHR users would prefer to start paying for the EHR services. Even if deep down they’d feel like it was wrong and unfair.

As I argued in the post above, the real problem with all of this is that transferring EMR and EHR data isn’t as simple as even accounting data (like the Outright example above). Moving from one EHR to another is a pretty intense process and leaves much to be desired. Although, it’s not like Free EHR software are the only EHR companies that could go under, be bought out, be merged, etc. Everyone says that EHR company consolidation has to happen and so the transfer of data from one EMR and EHR company to another could happen for all sorts of EMR companies large (see Misys) and small.

Also, I think one other difference between the Free EHR companies and the Outright example above is that Free EHR companies aren’t just an ad only business model like Outright. For example, there’s a lot more value in aggregate healthcare data than there is in aggregate accounting data. Even anonymous healthcare data is incredibly valuable if done right. Not to mention a number of other possible business models that could be placed on top of a Free EHR offering.

As always, I’m not trying to scare people away from the Free EHR model or drive people to that model either. My point is to just bring to light all of the possibilities of what can happen if someone should choose to go with the Free EHR model. I’m sure there are even more angles to this which will be brought up in the comments. I look forward to the discussion.

I also sent an email to my contacts at Practice Fusion and Mitochon Systems saying I was going to write an article about this and asked them for a response. Here are their responses and I’m quite sure they’ll join us in the comments as well.

Practice Fusion’s response:
It’s hard to see a young company like Outright struggle with their pricing, but the truth is that being a free, web-based business is not for everyone. Practice Fusion does not succeed by being free alone. Our dedication to delivering the easiest to use product, our phenomenal support team, the support of 80,000 healthcare providers across the country, our sustainable platform – these are the elements that have made us the largest EHR community in the country. We are 100% committed to bringing free EHR technology to every doctor in the country and that will never, ever change.

Mitochon System’s response
There are two key differences between Mitochon’s free EHR model and the small software service company you cited, Outright.

First, Outright offers its services directly to individual consumers. There is no third-party payer involved and the service does not provide value-added for anyone but the individual purchaser. In contrast, healthcare is often compared to a three-legged stool: patients, providers (physicians, hospitals) and payers (health plans, employers). When a physician provides care to a patient, a third-party usually picks up all or part of the bill. Free EHRs can potentially add value for all three parties involved. Our experience has been that both payers and providers are willing to subsidize or support free EHRs through paid clinical messaging (ads, health message reminders).

Second, it appears that Outright tried the ad-supported model and it failed for them. Although the article does not state exactly why the advertisers were dissatisfied, it might be that the user demographic was poor. Perhaps the Outright users just didn’t buy enough of the advertised products.

In contrast, physicians are major purchasers of goods and services for their patients and their organizations. According to Dr. John Eisenberg, a leading medical economist, physicians’ professional fees alone represent about 20% of all health care expenditures and they are responsible for decisions that govern how 90% of each health care dollar is allocated. With annual health care expenditures in the U.S. now topping $2.5 trillion, clearly physicians are a highly desirable audience for paid messaging delivered by many different organizations.

In conclusion, we know for a fact that the free EHR model works now and we believe it will grow and expand dramatically in the future.

HIMSS11 EMR Company and EMR Market Wrap Up

Posted on February 25, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s going to take a couple weeks to really process all that I saw and heard at HIMSS 2011. In fact, there’s no doubt that much of the content I publish over the next month or two will be things I learned from the people I learned from at HIMSS or influenced by what I saw and heard. However, after a good night’s sleep in my own bed I’m really happy with my experience at HIMSS. The energy and passion for healthcare IT that was found at HIMSS was really powerful and wonderful to be apart of.

I think those people out there that are asking if we’re in a healthcare IT bubble right now are on the mark. There’s very little doubt in my mind that we’re in a healthcare IT bubble. It’s a feature of $36+ billion in EHR incentive money being given out by the government. I can’t remember the size of the EMR market numbers off the top of my head, but $36 billion in money coming into what is a relatively small market is going to change things dramatically. So, it makes sense that this type of infusion of money would create a bubble of sorts.

One person in their comments that we’re in a healthcare IT bubble asked if the bubble would pop before HIMSS 12 in Las Vegas. I believe we have at least one or two more years before the healthcare IT bubble pops. In fact, if you thought that HIMSS 11 in Orlando was big, I predict that HIMSS 2012 in Las Vegas will be even bigger. The EHR incentive money will have started flowing and the trench battles will be in full swing as the 300+ EMR vendors battle each other for customers.

EMR software was obviously my focus at the conference and despite my comments about the lack of innovation by EMR vendors and the future of EMR, I think there are a ton of really interesting EMR approaches that in aggregate are going to impact the EMR world in really dramatic ways. Here’s some examples:

  • Azzly described a meeting of EHR vendors they attended with ONC. The question was asked which EHR vendors in the room started development after the HITECH act was announced. Azzly was the only one to raise their hand. I’m sure there’s other EHR vendors in that same boat, but it will be interesting to see an Azzly EHR that was built post incentive go up against the legacy EHR software.
  • ClearPractice was the first native iPad EMR (called Nimble) that I’d seen and there’s no doubt they’ve made a big play in that space. Will that combined with the backing of John Doerr and their internet driven sales change EMR as we know it?
  • Will larger companies like Greenway and Sage continue to gain market share as they go after the EMR market while maintaining their customer experience? Or will they head the way of the Misys of the world and be bought up by other EMR vendors?
  • What about NaviNet‘s entrance into the EMR world? Can they leverage their existing connections with so many providers to be a major player in not just interoperability but in EMR as well?
  • Even the big behemoth of a company, GE surprised me when I visited with them. There was a polish and a professionalism that I loved about my visit with GE and GE’s Centricity Advance people. I think there’s a fair comparison with Microsoft. Something about the nature of the US loves the underdog and hates the big name player. Yet, the big company just keeps executing their vision and many doctors are going to happily buy and use their products.
  • What about Ingenix‘s multiple EMR offering strategy? Will it just be confusing to clinicians or will they effectively differentiate their various offerings while providing a backbone for interoperability as well? Is the future large EMR vendor one that aggregates a bunch of niche specific EMR companies?
  • What impact will the transcription based EMR vendors have on the market? I wrote about the change from transcription company to EMR vendor earlier this week. Watch for the names MD-IT, FutureNet, Intivia, and MxSecure.
  • Many people probably don’t recognize the name MedPlus. However, everyone knows the company behind the MedPlus Care360 EMR: Quest Diagnostics. There’s something powerful about being able to turn on an EMR in a medical practice with basically the flip of an electronic switch. That’s what MedPlus can do since Care360 is already being used in so many clinics that use Quest for their lab work. Add in their existing lab sales staff that already have relationships with large numbers of clinics and they’re going to be a very interesting player in the EMR space.
  • Free EMR is a really compelling marketing tool. There’s a reason that Practice Fusion and Mitochon Systems free EMR offerings get so much press and so many doctors evaluating their EMR offerings. While many might disagree with their model or even believe that it will fail, these companies have and will have an interesting impact on the EMR landscape.
  • MicroMD offers an interesting approach. First, because of their existing LONG term practice management clients. Second, because of the interesting integration with the supply side of their company. Not to mention, the executives that I met with were some of the most realistic people and well thought out people I met at HIMSS.
  • Props to EMR company MIE that could use a fake EMR company (Extormity) to launch themselves into the EMR discussion while also helping to open up the discussion as well.  If I were a doctor, I’d want to demo their EMR just so I could see if I could find any Extormity features in their EMR.  Although, maybe that’s just the blogger in me.

I could keep going on, but that gives you a bit of flavor of some interesting EMR vendors and their market approaches. Plus, this is just 16 of the 300+ EMR companies that are working in this space. Each one with their own interesting story.

The most exciting thing for an EMR nerd like myself is that we’re really only at the beginning. Wait until we get beyond 15-25% adoption and reach 50% adoption. Then, the fun really begins.

Full Disclosure: Practice Fusion, MD-IT, MxSecure, and Mitochon Systems are all advertisers on this site. EMRandHIPAA.com’s HIMSS11 coverage was also sponsored by Practice Fusion, provider of the free, web-based Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system used by over 70,000 healthcare providers in the US.

Lots of Interesting Discussions at HIMSS Day 1

Posted on February 20, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s been a really interesting first day of HIMSS. I’d heard good things about the Health IT Venture Forum in past years and so I was really glad to be able to attend this year. Of course, if you’re following @techguy and/or @ehrandhit, then you’ve already read a number of my updates.

I also posted what might be the biggest news coming out of HIMSS 11 today that meaningful use stage 2 will include EHR usability.

I was impressed by the Mitochon systems presentation at the New Venture Forum. I had a great talk with CEO, Chris Riley after their presentation. I really like his vision for what they’re working to create. The more I talk with Free EHR vendors like Mitochon, the more I can see the potential of their business model. Shahid, the Healthcare IT Guy, told me that he knew of a couple other free EHR at HIMSS. I didn’t get those requests, so I’m interested to know the other Free EHR competitors. (Full Disclosure: Mitochon is an advertiser on this site)


As you can see from that tweet. I was really intrigued by ZyDoc. I’ve been fascinated with NLP since last HIMSS. Combine that with the increasingly popular auto coding engines that are coming out and it’s a really interesting offering.

One of the presenters at the venture forum said the following about the hospital connectivity market. I wonder what people think about it:


I’ve always been fascinated with China. Add in my interest in EHR and of course I loved the presentation on EHR in China. This company is even more interesting since they have built the EHR with the Chinese character set and it seems like they understand the Chinese healthcare culture.


I loved how the Rothman score tried to quantify a patient’s condition for early warning. To see the score change on a graph really does change your view of a patient’s progress. I just wonder what a hospital’s liability is if the score changes and they don’t follow the alert. I also wonder how many false positives it would produce. Some sort of summary like this has to be the future. I really hope that they’re successful.

The following tweet was the best quote by Aneesh Chopa, CTO of the US. I also loved his energy. I bet he’d be a fascinating person to have dinner with.

I also had a chance to meet with Shareable Ink, but I think I’m going to save my discussion of their technology for an after HIMSS post. So, watch for that. It’s really neat technology.

The increasingly famous Brantley Whittington, CEO of spoof EMR company Extormity, stopped and chatted with me. I’m still holding out on saying who’s behind Extormity, but just look for the Brantley Whittington name badge and you’ll be able to figure it out early (or check back Tuesday when I’ll post it).

I also had a good chat with Dynamic Health IT during the HIMSS opening reception. Check them out for EHR certification and meaningful use consulting. Or as they describe it, the gap analysis for hospitals interested in becoming certified and showing meaningful use. Yes, they help with the hospital EHR self-certification.

In the evening, I got the chance to meet with Dana Sellers, CEO of Encore Health Resources. I told one PR person that emailed me that I have a policy of only meeting with smart people. Dana definitely fits this category.

As most of you know, a lot of my focus is on the ambulatory EMR world and so I appreciate Dana taking some time to talk with me (and really educate me) about healthcare IT in the hospital world. One of the most incredible things they told me was that Encore Healthcare has 143 employees and they’re only 2 years old. That’s some pretty good growth for an EHR consulting company.

One thing I was impressed with was Dana’s candor with her previous company (which was sold to IBM) and now what they’re able to do with Encore Health. Dana was partially embarrassed to admit that in the previous company they worried too much about processes and not enough on getting the data back out. She did say that she thinks that Encore Health is in a much better position based on changes to technology and the environment to really get the data out of these systems so they can focus even more on the quality of healthcare that’s provided.

So much more that I could share from my talk with Dana. It probably deserves it’s on post and most certainly the things she shared with me will come up in future posts. Needless to say I was extremely impressed with Dana and so it’s no wonder why Encore Health has been so successful. I might have to stop by Tommy Bahama’s again just to hang out with more smart people.

Finally, a couple interesting tweets I saw during the show:


and
http://twitter.com/#!/biomedsociety/status/39357644800000001

Isn’t it cool that I can cover sessions that I didn’t even attend thanks to Twitter?

Much much more tomorrow. Unless I’m too tired from all the parties;-)

EMRandHIPAA.com’s HIMSS11 coverage is sponsored by Practice Fusion, provider of the free, web-based Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system used by over 70,000 healthcare providers in the US.