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Why Don’t We See More Google for Work in Healthcare?

Posted on November 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently sitting down with a number of hospital CIOs and they were talking about the expenses they have associated with Microsoft Office and the move to Office 365. It was fascinating to hear them talk about the costs associated with all of these Microsoft products which still dominate the enterprise healthcare market. In fact, they didn’t once mention any sort of alternative.

I then asked them why they thought we didn’t see more Google for Work in healthcare. It’s been reported that Google for Work now has 2 million paid business customers. My guess is that healthcare makes a very very small portion of those 2 million customers. In fact, I don’t think most organizations really even take the time to consider Google for Work as an option.

The response from the CIOs I was talking with confirmed this suspicion. Each of them had used Google for Work outside of their day job, but they hadn’t ever seriously considered it for their hospital email, document management, calendar, etc. Although, they universally expressed their hate for having to manage their hospital’s messaging system. It’s a no win situation where everyone has the expectation that it will work perfectly 100% of the time and we know that messaging has plenty of opportunities for problems and unexpected downtime.

I’d think that many hospital CIOs would love to offload this headache to Google which likely has a much superior track record for uptime and consistency than most hospital IT departments that are working with limited budget and staff.

As one hospital CIO recently told me, “I’m glad that Cerner won the DoD contract. It doesn’t matter whether I like Epic or Cerner more. I’m just glad to have competition in the EHR market and Cerner winning the DoD project means it’s still a 2 horse race.” I think the same is true in messaging. Microsoft had been the only dog in the messaging race forever. Having Google for Work a legitimate competitor would be a good thing.

Salesforce Reportedly Working to Create $1 Billion Healthcare Business

Posted on November 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

That’s the news as reported by Reuters in late October. The article talks about Salesforce’s interest in creating a healthcare business and believe it can reach $1 billion in revenue. The article also highlights how SalesForce has recently hired over a dozen people from the healthcare and medical device sectors.

Plus, they even talk about the roll out of the CareWeb Messenger product that is built on the top of Salesforce’s technology:

The University of California at San Francisco, for instance, rolled out CareWeb Messenger, built on top of Salesforce’s technology, through which doctors, nurses and patients talk online and on mobile devices. UCSF and Salesforce have close ties: in April, CEO Marc Benioff donated $100 million to its children’s hospital.

I’ll be interested to see how this first product plays out. It actually fits into Salesforce’s core competencies quite well. Although, the secure healthcare messaging space is a crowded one. With that said, I was invited to a Salesforce event to talk about healthcare. Unfortunately, the timing was bad so I couldn’t make it, but now I’m particularly interested in what was said at the event.

It seems that sooner or later, all of the big tech companies come after healthcare. We’ve seen the same with Google, Microsoft, Dell, Apple, Samsung, and many more. While it must be incredibly enticing for these companies to come after a trillion dollar market like healthcare, most of these companies come into healthcare with an amazing amount of naivety as to the complexities of healthcare. Once they get in, they find these complexities and change their mind. We’ll see if Salesforce does something similar.

With that said, Salesforce has the money, the platform and the connections to do something in healthcare. Plus, I welcome fresh ideas and perspectives from companies like Salesforce in healthcare. I think that we all agree that there’s a huge opportunity for technology to improve healthcare. I want as many people working on finding those solutions as possible. Doesn’t hurt to have a multi-billion dollar company taking an interest in it as well.

What do you think of Salesforce’s entrance into healthcare? Will they be a major player? Where do you think it makes sense for them to focus their efforts?

Some of the articles on this talk about Salesforce building an EHR or things like that. Given the regulations and the environment, I never see that happening. Although, with the money they have available to them, maybe they’ll surprise us all.

Telehealth, BYOD Gain Momentum In 2013

Posted on January 4, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I’ll be honest — I’m always a bit skeptical when I read on health IT trends appearing in a general-interest corporate IT magazine.  Ours is such a tricky business that the nuances often escape my brethren in the journalistic field, unless of course they specialize in the health IT business. But in this case, an eWeek piece has delivered some useful information, and even caught me off guard a bit.

The piece contends that BYOD issues and the use of telehealth are likely to shape the year in health IT:

BYOD:  Bring-your-own-device problems aren’t unique to healthcare by any means, but they’re certainly become a particularly high-profile issue in healthcare.

In the piece, eWeek quotes Dennis Schmuland, chief health strategy  officer for U.S. Health and Life Sciences at Microsoft, who argues that BYOD costs, including privacy, security and licensing for virtualization of software are so high that BYOD may actually be costing organizations big money. Good (and interesting) point.

Certainly, healthcare organizations can’t afford to let that keep happening in 2013, and this year, solutions are likely to emerge, Schmuland told the magazine.

Telehealth:  While they’re in their early stages right now, telehealth services such as American Well’s Online Care are likely to get a stronger footing this year, the eWeek article suggests.

Lynne Dunbrack, program director of connected health IT strategies at IDC Health Insights, notes that consumers are getting used to having videoconferencing at their fingertips, given the extent to which webcams are now embedded in laptops and video chat on mobile phones.

Now that they’re accustomed to videoconferencing, they’ll soon want to use this capability for telehealth visits with doctors, eWeek reports:

Sending a blood pressure reading and seeing a doctor online could be more convenient than taking off from work, Dunbrack noted.

“If you can just go in and have these quick visits, people would be more apt to make these appointments and keep them, and organizations will start to experiment with these services,” said Dunbrack.

In all candor, I think both Schmuland and Dunbrack are a bit ahead of the market. I doubt that we’ll see a huge expansion of telehealth this year, though there may be some additional uptake. And as for BYOD, I’m not expecting to see any comprehensive solution that providers can affordably adopt this year; after all, trends are still shifting and there’s tons of moving parts to consider. But I do think we will see some progress in both areas.  All told, the two have offered some useful fodder for thinking about 2013.

Broadband Mobile Should Change mHealth Game

Posted on June 22, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

You never know what you’re going to learn when you wander into a cell phone store,  other than being hit with some fairly slick marketing slicks and rapid-fire pitched on that sweet, sweet iPhone upgrade. (Sorry, letting my Apple lust get in the way here.)

In all seriousness, this time I learned something which excited the heck out of me. While this is probably old news to some readers, I was surprised to learn that the cellphone industry is now rolling out support for new mobile protocols allowing for dramatic improvements in broadband mobile speeds.

One standard, LTE, can offer peak downlink rates of 300 Mbps and peak uplinks of 75 Mbps.  LTE, which takes advantage of new digital signal processing techniques developed roughly 10 years ago, is being rolled out by more or less every major U.S. carrier. Existing 4G networks are should shoot up in capacity as well. The next revision of the family to which 4G belongs, standards-wise,  should have a throughput capacity of 627 Mbps.

So let’s bring this around to our ongoing EMR discussions.  What are the HIT implications of these mobile nodes having the throughput to process live streaming video, download multiple imaging studies, conference effortlessly with parties across the world and more?

Well, for one thing, it’s pretty clear that our idea of mHealth will have to change. It makes no sense to plan networks around data sipping apps like the current iPhone crop when you’ll soon have iPads, Android devices and even Microsoft’s Surface tablet drinking it in gulps.

Obviously, the whole notion of telemedicine will evolve dramatically, with roving doctors and nurses consulting effortlessly over mobile video.  Skype calls will be as easy to conduct as traditional calls. And reviewing charts from the road will make much more sense, including looks at, say, CT scan results.

But all of this wonderfulness will be severely constrained if EMR makers keep forcing clinicians to use their systems via mobile-hostile devices. This is the time — this month, week and even day — to admit that desktop computers aren’t the platform of choice for smart clinicians.Vendors will have to step up with native clients for remote devices, and moreover, clients that take advantage of the emerging high-speed phones and tablets. If they hang back, the whole mobile high-speed revolution won’t be happpening.

April Fools Day, Genomics EHR, EMR Blogs, and Hospital IT Consultants

Posted on April 1, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’m usually all over April Fool’s Day on this site. I actually even had a great idea this year as well (some might remember my EMR Announcement last year), but with April Fool’s Day being on Sunday, I decided to pass this year. I’ll bring it back next year I’m sure.

As expected, Epic did another great job on their home page for April Fool’s Day. EpiCot partnership with Disney is pretty creative. Some might argue that the Epic campus is already EpiCot. Here’s a screenshot of it in case you missed it (click on the image twice to see it full size):

Mark Dente describes a genomic EHR as being quite far away. Certainly it’s not going to happen tomorrow, but I think it’s a little closer than he describes in this article. Although, much of the genomic research is still just beginning so we’ll see how quickly it can scale up and produce results. That will be the key.

Check out the article in the tweet to learn more about Caradigm, GE’s healthcare partnership with Microsoft. It’s definitely all about the data.


Never heard of any EMR blogs. Have you?


Really? I wonder how well these consulting companies will do post-EHR incentive money. This will be interesting to see play out.

PHR Options for Meeting Meaningful Use Stage 2

Posted on March 29, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

An EHR vendor recently asked me for some suggestions of PHR or portal options that they could use with their EHR software. Turns out that this is going to be particularly important given the changes in meaningful use stage 2 that require you to not only share medical information with the patient, but the patients have to actually access that information as well (unless that gets taken out in the MU stage 2 rule making process). Regardless, the question of which PHR and/or patient portal solutions was an interesting question. Here’s my answer to him (with a little bit added):

I only know of a few and you’ve probably heard of the ones I know about. I’m also not sure of the price of the various options really [He wanted to know of an inexpensive option]. Here’s what I know:

I like what NoMoreClipboard has done and that they’ve been doing it a really long time. They have a good understanding of how to work with many different vendors and also sizes of practices or healthcare institutions. Plus, you can be sure they’re going to be on top of all the meaningful use stage 2 requirements you’ll need to meet.

I also know that Medical Web Experts was working hard on a patient portal. I’m not sure how far it’s come since I first talked to them though. It might be one worth checking out. Just be sure that they can meet the meaningful use stage 2 requirements.

Then, of course you have Microsoft HealthVault. Everyone seems to know about them. I’ve heard that they’re a bit of a challenge to integrate with. Hopefully they also don’t have the same fate as Google Health. Although, Microsoft has a much better position in healthcare than Google ever did.

Coincidentally, I also was just emailed about a brand new book just released by O’Reilly Media about HealthVault and how to integrate with it. It’s called Enabling Programmable Self with HealthVault: An Accessible Personal Health Record. I’ve heard it’s a pretty technical book that would be quite useful if you decided to go with Healthvault for your PHR.

What other PHR and/or patient portal options are out there? I’m sure there are more that I’m missing and have probably just forgotten about them.

I’ll be interested to see if meaningful use stage 2 will drive the return of the PHR.

Full Disclosure: NoMoreClipboard is an advertiser on this site.

World Health IT Market Size, Microsoft in Healthcare, Advanced EHR Usage, EHR Usability, and ICD-10

Posted on March 4, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Back once again for our weekend roundup of EMR and Health IT tweets. A number of interesting tweets out there this weekend, so let’s get to it.


$162.2 Billion (yes, that’s billion with a B) for the world Healthcare IT market. That’s a lot of money going to healthcare IT. Considering how far along we are (or maybe I should’t say aren’t) in the US, imagine how much bigger that’s going to be. Although, much of this market is in equipment. Just take a look at the RSNA conference to see what I mean.


Google Health gave us this lesson as well. Although, I love seeing bigger companies take risks.


I’m always surprised when I hear story after story of someone “adopting an EHR” and then realizing that they use a very small subset of the EHR features. So, I definitely agree with this tweet.

These next 2 tweets go together:


This is a pretty complex question. One I’ll have to consider a bit more. I’d love to hear your thoughts.


This was a tweet from the #HealthITJam chat I participated in for a bit. If you haven’t read my post on ICD-10, you should.

The New Healthcare Team: GE & Microsoft

Posted on December 13, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Editor’s Note: The following is a guest post by Jeremy Bikman. You can read more about the GE and Microsoft Venture on EMR and EHR.


Guest Post: Jeremy Bikman is Chairman at KATALUS Advisors, a strategic consulting firm focused on the healthcare vertical. We help vendors grow, guide hospitals into the future, and advise private equity groups on their investments. Our clients are found in North America, Europe, and Asia. www.KATALUSadvisors.com

Healthcare is being held hostage and it doesn’t even know it.

It is held hostage by burdensome regulations, by archaic practices, and (oddly enough) by technology itself. In this age of Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, an age where anybody with internet access can connect to somebody else on the other side of the globe and share personal information and other data with the click of a mouse, it is impossible that you could visit a hospital in the next town over and they would be able to procure your personal health information as easily or as quickly.

Healthcare, globally and locally, is utterly huge and mind-blowingly complex, and thus absolutely needs the very best innovation of everybody involved. Yet, healthcare technology companies almost universally deliver products which are built on closed-minded concepts. They lock down their platforms, creating real barriers to interoperability, patient data exchange, and actual innovation. This is the present reality within, and across, practically every hospital on earth. The recently announced joint venture between GE and Microsoft offers hope of an alternate reality, one where hospitals can bring together data streams from all over the enterprise, while utilizing new innovations and technology as they see fit, including different best-of-breed sources.

Giving Hospitals a New Choice
There are huge flaws in how technology is delivered in healthcare today, flaws which impact quality of care within a hospital and across the entire industry irrespective of country or region. While the rest of the tech world is moving towards open platforms and collaborative delivery models, healthcare seems to be stuck in the dark ages of single-source solutions which compel all-or-nothing investments to the tune of millions and millions of dollars. Too often those investments fail. But, the more important question is why must hospitals be forced into all-or-nothing decisions in the first place? Why must they choose between integration and functionality, between a single platform, however mediocre, and a best-of-breed mix? We believe those are questions of the antiquated past and that brave new innovation can deliver a new avenue for hospitals who refuse to be painted into a corner. Hospitals shouldn’t have to choose between apples and oranges. They want, and should be able to get, both.

The Basics of the Joint Venture
Selected product lines from both companies’ health groups will be part of the new company. These products were chosen for their specific focus on “empowering connected patient-centric care.”

GE is contributing an interoperable clinical data model and decision support system via Qualibria. GE’s eHealth is an HIE solution in use at a large number of sites in North America. Microsoft is bringing Amalga to the table, which is a data aggregation platform which facilitates interoperability and a host of other advanced capabilities. Vergence and expreSSO come through Microsoft’s acquisition of Sentillion and provide strong context management and single sign-on solutions. The strategy appears to be one of leveraging Microsoft’s platform technology (Amalga) to underpin GE’s clinical depth (Qualibria, eHealth). Additionally, this model will allow hospitals and vendors to integrate best-of-breed 3rd party products into the ecosystem as they see fit. This mix of products and capabilities will enable a true best-of-breed environment emerge while still having the core elements of integration as well. This ecosystem will be powered by the partnership’s own applications and those built by ISVs. No other major vendor offers this unique model and set of abilities, although Allscripts is the one traditional EMR vendor that is building a strategy of accepting of 3rd party solutions.

Tackling the Big Problems

No one is saying that this joint venture is guaranteed to be a resounding success. However, we applaud the visionary model and risks this new team is taking. It looks like they want to address all the big hairy obstacles that every provider organization, region, and nation is facing. Big data? Absolutely. Enterprise analytics and business intelligence? Yes. Clinical decision support? For sure. Population management? You bet. Nobody else in the industry has shown they can tackle these issues even though every hospital is clamoring for this type of model. So why not this joint venture between GE and Microsoft? We say good luck, and more power to them.

The principals of KATALUS Advisors have worked with hundreds of healthcare organizations, vendors, and other consulting firms across the globe. The opinions expressed here are our own and are not intended to promote any specific vendor and do not reflect those of any other organization or individual.

Software User Interface Redesign

Posted on December 8, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I opened up a web browser and eventually made it to Twitter to see what was going on. I was greeted by the not so friendly Twitter site redesign. If you’re on the Twitter page at all, you won’t miss it. To be honest, it felt like going to a foreign land. I use a number of tools for Twitter, but my favorite is just going to the Twitter website to consume and send my @techguy tweets. Although, maybe I should say it WAS my favorite place.

Yes, change is always hard, but isn’t that kind of the point? Was there any announcement about the change before it happened? Nope! Did they give users a chance to try the new interface before they made a wholesale swap to the new interface? Nope. Google’s actually done this really well recently with things like Gmail. They’ve made the new interface available, but you can always click back to the old interface if you don’t like. That way they can solicit feedback and improve the new interface while still not alienating those that love the old interface.

In my example on Twitter, I quickly was able to identify the thing that annoys me most. When I click on someone’s Twitter name it gives me a pop up box for that person. Before it use to have that appear on the side. It’s a small subtle change, but makes a huge difference since on the side I can continue consuming tweets, but in a pop up box I have to remove it before I continue on.

I could go on about the new Twitter, but the point is that software vendors have to be careful when they change the user interface. Maybe this new Twitter interface will even grow on me. I didn’t like the last time they changed the Twitter interface either, but once I found some of the secret features I came around for the most part. Maybe I’ll come around on this too, but it would have been nice if I knew it was coming.

What does this have to do with EMR?

The connection seems quite clear to me. EMR and EHR companies have to be really careful and considerate when they change their EHR interface. Give users options to be able to try it and to adapt to it over time. With a sort of limited opt in release of a new EMR interface to an active user base, you’ll likely get a lot of pointed feedback for the new EMR interface. Certainly you’ll get the useless “I hate the new look” emails without any value. However, you’ll also get the pointed emails that provide constructive ideas on things you probably didn’t realize were important in the old EMR interface.

Most SaaS EHR companies are constantly considering this since they’re rolling out changes to their software all the time. Client server based EHR software also takes it into account, but this can be shown and taught as each client is upgraded.

The main point is to be thoughtful of and upgrade to your EHR user interface. Get feedback and whenever possible let them opt in and out of the new interface so you don’t alienate your users.

While I may not be totally enamored by the new Twitter interface, I do always love new features in software. For example, as part of the new Twitter interface there’s a feature that lets you embed tweets. Here’s a few EMR related tweets to see how it works.


And then some big news from GE and Microsoft that just came out:

Hmmm…still looks like they have some work to complete on their embedded tweets (UPDATE: The preview looked different from when it’s posted. It’s not too bad in the actual post). Sounds like many doctors talking about EHR features that get rolled out.

What Will Happen to Google Health Data After 2012?

Posted on July 21, 2011 I Written By

Let’s face it, I haven’t actually been nice to Google of late when it comes to healthcare (or maybe I have, just once). While I believe the criticisms are justified, I can see why some people might think I’m beating a dead horse, namely Google Health. But there are some unresolved questions in the area of privacy that Google really should answer.

Google’s ill-fated attempt at a PHR isn’t completely dead. The company won’t “retire” the online service until January, and will allow users to download their data through Jan. 1, 2013. Naturally, others have stepped up to try to fill the (tiny) void left by Google Health’s demise. To nobody’s surprise, Microsoft is helping the remarkably small number of Google Health users transition their accounts to HealthVault, Microsoft’s own overly hyped, underutilized PHR platform.

What concerns me is what will happen to data already on Google’s servers. Will records be archived? Will sensitive patient health data stay on Google’s servers in perpetuity? Nobody has said for sure.

Are records safe from Google’s data-mining juggernaut? Google has consistently said that it would not use health records for anything other than to steer traffic to its core search engine, but let’s face it, Google’s primary source of revenue is from algorithm-driven advertising.

But, you say, HIPAA protects patients from unauthorized uses of their data, right? Well, remember back to 2009, when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act expressly made third-party data repositories, health information networks and, yes, personal health records, into HIPAA business associates, effectively holding them to the same rules as covered entities under HIPAA.

Wouldn’t you know, both Google and Microsoft came out and said they were not subject to this provision. No less an insider than former national health IT coordinator Dr. David Brailer, who was a part of the legislative negotiations, told me then that lawmakers had Google Health and HealthVault specifically in mind when they crafted the ARRA language. As far as I know, there haven’t been any reported data breaches involving either PHR platform, so there’s been no need to test whether ARRA actually does apply to them, but if I had my data on Google’s or Microsoft’s servers, I’d be concerned. I’d particularly want to know what Google plans on doing with the data it’s been holding once Google Health does shut down.

Perhaps it’s time for me to make some phone calls.