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We Share Health Data with Marketing Companies, Why Not with Healthcare Providers? Answer: $$

Posted on November 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those who don’t realize it, your health data is being shared all over the place. Yes, we like to think that our health care data is being stored and protected and that laws like HIPAA keep them safe, but there are plenty of ways to legally share health care data today. In fact, many EHR vendors sell your health care data for a pretty penny.

Of course, many would argue that it’s shared in a way that complies with all the laws and that it’s done in a way that your health record isn’t individually identified. They’re only sharing your health data in a de-identified manner. Others would argue that you can’t deidentify the health data and that there are ways to reidentify the data. I’ll leave those arguments for another post. We’ll also leave the argument over whether all this sharing of health data (usually to marketing, pharma and insurance companies) is safe or not for a future post as well.

What’s undeniable is that health data for pretty much all of us is being bought and sold all over health care. If you don’t believe it’s so, take a minute to look at the work of Deborah Peel from Patient Privacy Rights and learn about her project theDataMap. She’ll be happy to inform you of all the ways data is currently being bought and sold. It’s a really big business.

Here’s where the irony comes in. We have no trouble sharing health data (Yes, even EHR vendors have no problem sharing data and lets be clear that not all EHR vendors share data with these outside companies but mare are sharing data) with marketing companies, payers and pharma companies that are willing to pay for access to that data. Yet, when we ask EHR vendors to share health data with other EHR vendors or with an HIE, they balk at the idea as if it’s impossible. They follow that up with a bunch of lame excuses about HIPAA privacy or the complexity of health care data.

Let’s call a spade a spade. We could pretty easily be interoperable in health care if we wanted to be interoperable. We know that’s true because when the money is there from these third party companies, EHR vendors can share data with them. The problem has been that the money has never been there before for EHR vendors to be motivated enough to make interoperability between EHR vendors possible. In fact, you could easily argue that the money was instructing EHR vendors not to be interoperable.

However, times are changing. Certainly the government pressure to be interoperable is out there, but that doesn’t really motivate the industry if there’s not some financial teeth behind it. Luckily the financial teeth are starting to appear in the form of value based reimbursement and the move away from fee for service. That and other trends are pushing healthcare providers to want interoperable health records as an important part of their business. That’s a far cry from where interoperability was seen as bad for their business.

I heard about this shift first hand recently when I was talking with Micky Tripathi, President & CEO of the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative. Micky told me that his organization had recently run a few RFPs for healthcare organizations searching for an EHR. As part of the EHR selection process Micky recounted that interoperability of health records was not only included in the RFP, but was one of the deciding factors in the healthcare organizations’ EHR selections. The same thing would have never been said even 3-5 years ago.

No doubt interoperability of health records has a long way to go, but there are signs that times are changing. The economics are starting to make sense for organizations to embrace interoperablity. That’s a great thing since we know they can do it once the right economic motivations are present.

#HIMSS14 Day 1 – Interoperability, HIE and Social Media

Posted on February 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Well, this is technically my second or third day, but this is the first official day of HIMSS. It’s a mad house like you can imagine and the vendor hall is as big as you’d expect. You need about 3 weeks to go through it. I actually decided to do a walking meeting with someone and we basically walked the whole exhibit floor twice. Luckily, the conversation was good and we dove into some interesting topics. I also told them about my future mobile strategy for Healthcare Scene. She liked it. Hopefully I can roll it out in the next few months.

My day happened to start off with a lot of discussion on interoperability and HIE with MAeHC and then Orion Health. I think it’s really interesting to see the progress we’ve made when it comes to interoperability and HIE, but I also found it interesting that Micky Tripathi from MAeHC still described healthcare interoperability as being in its infancy. I largely agree with him and it’s really too bad. Although, it was also interesting to compare that to Orion Health talking about how they’ve proven that HIE can work. Plus, they also noted something I’ve written multiple times: Private HIEs are growing faster than the Public HIEs.

I’m still really torn on the business model for interoperability and HIEs. I don’t see a clear model in most situations. I even saw one tweet yesterday that talked about taxing on a per patient basis to pay for the HIE. I heard that in NY they’re actually literally working on a tax to fund it. However, I really think that calling it a per patient tax is a really bad way to describe the funding. I’ll certainly be covering more of my interoperability and HIE discussions in the future. Watch for those blog posts in the coming weeks.

I also did a lot of social media talk today. Together with Shahid Shah and Cari McLean we had a discussion about Social Media and Influence. It was great to see so many friendly faces in the audience. I feel lucky every chance I get to hear Shahid talk. He’s really good at reframing things in interesting ways. Plus, Cari has a unique perspective to offer from her perch on top of the HIMSS Social Media tower. I previously noted that social media has just become an integral part of HIMSS. What’s interesting is that most of the companies at HIMSS haven’t created it as an integral part of their company. Many are still learning, but it’s great to see them learn. I hope many will attend the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference where we dive in a lot deeper on these topics.

As I said to someone today, social media can provide value to every company, but not every company should do social media. Some companies aren’t ready to commit to doing social media the right way. Other companies aren’t ready to be that open and transparent. Social media is just one tool in the kit. Although, it’s a really powerful one if used properly. I’ve also been touched by the power of social media to help individuals. Social media has connected me to people that would have no doubt been back at their rooms or in the corner of the event wondering why they were there, but instead they’re out having a good time and connecting with other interesting people.

There you go. I talked about a number of other things today, but I’ll cover that over the weeks and months ahead. For now I’m calling my day today HIMSS HIE, Interoperability and Social Media day.

Be sure to also check out my #HIMSS14 Twitter Roundup and my post on Hospital EMR and EHR about the real cause of hospital readmissions. I think the later post will be a post I reference over and over as people continue to talk about solutions that reduce hospital readmissions.