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Prediction: AHIMA 2013 Will Be ICD-10 All Day All the Time

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This will be my third year in a row attending the AHIMA Annual Conference (I think they call it the AHIMA Convention) which starts on Monday in Atlanta. I’m particularly excited for this year’s event because I have so many healthcare IT friends in Atlanta. Plus, I always have a great time at the event and learn a lot.

This year we’ll actually have three different Healthcare Scene bloggers (Jennifer Dennar, Mandi Bishop, and myself). So you can be sure to get some really varied coverage from the event from a number of different perspectives.

As I consider all the pitches I’ve gotten and think about the work of AHIMA, I can already tell that AHIMA 2013 is going to be dominated by one topic: ICD-10.

I honestly don’t think it’s even going to be close. I believe this is a very good thing. Hopefully the focus of attention on ICD-10 a little less than a year out from the ICD-10 implementation date is a good thing for the industry. You can be sure I’ll be doing what I can to help people better understand how they can prepare for ICD-10 and some of the tools out there.

Assuming I’m not too overwhelmed with all the AHIMA ICD-10 talk, next week I’d like to start a weekly series of posts on ICD-10. It feels right to call it ICD-10 Tuesdays. So, look forward to that series in the future.

Also, Agency Ten22 is holding the third annual tweet up at AHIMA on Tuesday evening. You can find more details and RSVP here. I’m reminded of the first tweetup. Beth from Agency Ten22 told me she had a nice suite. I told her I’d bring some Twitter friends and the AHIMA tweetup was born. Big thanks to Beth and her team for carrying on the tradition.

Finally, the rest of my travel for this year is booked. I’ll be at the Digital Health Conference (20% discount if you use the code HCS) in NYC in November and at the mHealth Summit in Washington DC in December. I hope to see many of you at one of these events.

October 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Digital Health Conference in NYC

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As most of you know, I’ve been working with the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) for the past couple years on their Digital Health Conference. They buy some advertising on my websites, and I get the chance to attend an amazing event. I love this event, because NYeC has a great connection with the local community of doctors and hospitals and so the event is chalk full of those working in the trenches of healthcare. I expect this year to be no different.

The good news is that once again they’ve given readers of my websites a 20% registration discount. Just use the code HCS when registering at www.DigitalHealthConference.com.

They’ve lined up two keynote speakers for the event: George C. Halvorson, Chairman, Kaiser Permanente and Jim Messina, National Director, Organizing for Action; Campaign Manager, 2012 Obama Re-Election Campaign; Deputy Chief of Staff to President Obama. I like the mix of someone deeply rooted in healthcare and also someone who likely understands healthcare politics really well.

Along with the keynotes, I’m told they are looking at about 1200 attendees at the event. They’ve also published the full agenda of speakers. I look forward to seeing many of my readers at the event.

Along with the Digital Health Conference, I’ll be attending a number of other Healthcare IT conferences this year. Influential Networks has created a calendar of Fall health IT events where you’ll find myself and other influencers. Right now I have MGMA, CHIME, Healthcare Payments Processing & Compliance Summit, AHIMA, and the Digital Health Conference on my dance card. I may add mHealth Summit as well. Should make for an exciting fall conference season.

Let me know if you’ll be at any of these conferences. I always love to connect with readers in person.

September 5, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Mobile Health Trends and Technology

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While at the mHealth Summit 2012 in DC, I captured a couple videos to try and get an idea of the various mHealth trends that we’ve been seeing in 2012 and what we can expect from mobile health in 2013. Each video is quite short, but full of interesting thoughts on the mHealth industry.

The first two videos are with David Collins from mHIMSS. David has a unique insight since HIMSS has made a big entry into the mHealth space with their acquisition of the mHealth Summit.

In the first video, David Collins talks about the various mobile health trends he’s seen at the mHealth Summit.

In this second video, David Collins discusses some of the key findings from the recently published HIMSS Analytics mHealth survey results.

I also thought it was interesting to hear from Jonathon Dreyer from Nuance Communications to learn what trends he was seeing. Jonathon and Nuance have an interesting perspective since so many mHealth applications could benefit from voice integration. So, they have a unique view at what mHealth applications exist.

Plus, I have to throw in this video that Jonathon made that demonstrates the Nuance voice integration with mobile devices. Nuance actually created this “dummy” EMR system to demonstrate the capabilities of their mobile voice recognition API. I think this was a really smart move since the demo really does illustrate some of the voice capabilities that could be built into EMR software and all sorts of mobile health applications. The video isn’t the perfect demo of the product, but it definitely does give a great window on what could be done with voice recognition when integrated properly.

December 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

NBA Implements Cerner EHR – NFL Implements eCW

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Over the past couple weeks, a number of major athletic organizations have announced that they’re standardizing their healthcare documentation using EHR software. The NBA is using Cerner’s EHR and the NFL is using eCW’s EHR.

At first blush these announcements remind me of Walmart selling eCW at Sam’s Club and Costco selling Allscripts EHR. Everyone wondered why Costco and Sam’s Club were selling EHR. The obvious answer was that it was a great PR move by eCW and Allscripts. Although, I did hear about one doctor that hijacked an EHR selection process thanks to a Costco mailing. I think that’s the exception.

While big popular sports organizations like the NBA and eCW might be great PR for a company, it is really interesting to consider the unique healthcare needs of a sports league. The first thing that came to my mind was actually whether the teams would want to have their athletes’ health data on one platform. Often, the health of their players is part of their strategic advantage. Certainly there are a lot more rules about disclosure of injuries, but teams still play the injury card before games, in trades, and when signing new players. I imagine the staff doctors for the teams have to be careful how and what they document in the EHR if it’s going to be available to other teams. And we thought privacy was an issue in general EHR use. It’s much more complicated when you have millions of dollars riding on a player.

From a big data perspective, I’m interested to see if either of these leagues will be able to leverage the EHR data they collect in order to deal with the long term health issues of players. This is particularly true in the physically brutal NFL. I’m sure readers are familiar with the long term concussion questions and research that’s happening with the NFL. Not to mention the ongoing battle against the use of steroids and other performance enhancing drugs. Can a unified EHR help to provide a basis for research and understanding of the health consequences of playing in the NFL?

When I start to think about all the medical devices that are coming out, they’re really interesting in an NFL context as well. Imagine all the health data from various devices being sucked into the league’s EHR. When I talked with FitLinxx at the mHealth Summit, they said that the Boston Red Sox used their activity tracking device the year they won the World Series (Seems like Boston might want to consider using it again). From what they described, The Pebble (their activity tracking device) was a great way for the trainer to keep track of compliance with the fitness regiment they suggested. Should this data be in the league’s EHR? I can see health reasons to do so, but it does go back to the question of teams’ competitive advantages.

I bet device makers would love to compare professional athlete’s use of their devices against all of the other data that’s being collected by regular users. Would make for some pretty compelling charts if I could compare my health indicators against Lebron James or Peyton Manning.

What’s also interesting to consider about a major sports league using an EHR is a connected PHR. In these situations you want your players to be well connected to the doctor and you have a real financial interest in their compliance with doctors orders. PHR in this case could make a lot of sense. Although, I wonder if many prima donna athletes would balk at the idea. Well, at least they can have their agent or assistan log in for them.

I do wonder what special features Cerner and eCW were asked to do for the NFL and NBA. Of course, not much of it would likely be useful for the rest of us.

December 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

An Example of EHR as Database of Healthcare

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One of my favorite interviews at mHealth Summit was with Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip Technologies. I’d definitely heard good things about AirStrip, but I must admit that before our meeting I didn’t have a very good understanding of what AirStrip was really all about. I was pleased to learn that they are well deserving of the hype. I believe AirStrip will do wonderful things to help make healthcare data mobile and AirStrip is lucky to have Alan Portela leading the company. Alan is unique when it comes to healthcare IT leaders in that he understands the healthcare culture, but also has a unique vision for how healthcare can embrace the future.

The core of what AirStrip has done to date has been in OB and Cardiology. In fact, each of those areas is worthy of their own post and look into how they’ve changed the game in both of those areas. The OB side speaks to me since we recently had our fourth child. I can imagine how much better the workflow would have been had my wife’s OB had access to the fetal waveforms (CTGs) on her mobile device. Instead, it was left to the nurse to interpret the recordings and communicate them to the OB. There’s real power for an OB to have the data in the palm of their hand.

Similar concepts can be applied to cardiology. Timing is so huge when it comes to the heart and there’s little doubt that mobile access to healthcare data for a cardiologists can save a lot of time from when the data is collected to when the cardiologist interprets the results.

The real question is why did it take so long for someone like AirStrip to make this data mobile. The answer has many complexities, but it turns out that ensuring that the data displays to clinical grade quality is not as easy as one might think. An ECG waveform needs to be much more precise than a graph of steps taken.

While both of these areas are quite interesting, since I’m so embedded in the EHR world I was particularly interested in AirStrip’s move into making EHR data mobile. They’ve started with Meaningful Use Tracker, but based on my conversation with Alan Portela this is just the beginning. AirStrip wants to make your important clinical information mobile.

I pushed Alan on how he’ll be able to do this since so many EHR companies have created big barriers to being able to access their data. Turns out that Alan seems to share my view that EHR is the Database of Healthcare. This idea means that instead of the EHR doing everything for everyone, a whole ecosystem of companies are going to build amazingly advanced functionality on the back of the EHR data and functions.

In AirStrip’s case, they want to take EHR data and make it mobile. They don’t want to store the data. They don’t want to do the advanced clinical decision support. Instead, they want to leverage the EHR data and EHR functionality on a mobile device.

One key to this approach is that AirStrip wants to be able to do this for an organization regardless of which EHR you use on the backend. In fact, Alan argues that most hospital organizations are going to have multiple EHR systems under their purview. As hospitals continue to consolidate you can easily see how one organization is going to have a couple hospitals on Epic, a couple on Cerner, a couple on Meditech, etc. If AirStrip can be the consistent mobile front end for all of the major EHR companies, that’s a powerful value proposition for any hospital organization.

Of course, we’ll see if AirStrip gets that far. Right now they’re taking a smart approach to mobilizing specific clinical data elements. Although, don’t be surprised when they work to mobilize all of an organization’s healthcare data.

AirStrip is just one example of a company that’s using EHR as their database of healthcare data. I’m sure we’re going to see hundreds and thousands of companies who build powerful applications on the back of EHR data.

December 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

A Possible Mobile Health App to Compliment EMR #mhs11

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One of the really interesting companies that I’ve seen at both the Digital Health Conference in NYC and now at the mHealth Summit in DC is a company called Force Therapeutics. This company is part of the Startup Health crew of companies and have a pretty interesting product for ensuring patient compliance using a really cool mobile and web based app.

Force Therapeutics is their first product which is focused on physical therapists which is a smart first step since the founder is a physical therapist. At its core, Force Therapeutics is an application where a physical therapist can “prescribe” exercises that need to be done by their patients. Those doing the exercises can log into the app and see the video demonstrating the exercise and then mark down whether they did the exercise or not. By having the video present during the exercise, it helps the patient to perform the exercise properly and then the physical therapist can know how well their patients are complying with the exercises they prescribed.

The app is available on the web or on the iPad and I believe Android. Plus, they offer a pretty cool online store where physical therapists can direct their patients to purchase the various products they need to do the physical therapy. I imagine that could be a nice revenue stream for Force Therapeutics and could be really convenient for physical therapists and patients.

Force Therapeutics also has a consumer version of their application available on the app store that could enable those interested in trying some physical therapy exercises without going to their doctor or the physical therapist. This feels wrong for many in the US who are so use to needing a doctors referral to go to physical therapy. Could be an interesting play for Force Therapeutics to help out with those aches and pains that we all have (and are getting more the older we get) that aren’t worthy of a doctor, but could benefit from some mild “therapy.” I’m sure this will have many doctors and physical therapists cringing a little bit, but whether it’s Force Therapeutics is used or some other app, there’s little doubt that patients will be doing this sort of self directed therapy anyway.

As I saw an app like Force Therapeutics, I could see it as a nice add on to EMR software. My only fear is that it feels more like a feature of an EMR software as opposed to a product unto its own. Although, I think Force Therapeutics has a chance for a number of different reasons.

First, I don’t see many EMR vendors really diving into this space. Sure, some might do some pieces of this, but they have so many things on their development plate that I think it’s unlikely for most EHR software vendors to develop these type of features.

Second, physical therapy is a space where EMR hasn’t gone very much. Sure, there’s WebPT, but most physical therapists are still in the paper world. The EHR incentive money passed over physical therapists and so it seems that many of them will continue sitting on the sidelines. That leaves a great opportunity for niche apps to satisfy the needs of these niche providers.

Plus, when I talked to the Force Therapeutics founder, I think that one of their biggest opportunities is outside the physical therapy space. Sure, it would be easy to expand Force Therapeutics into orthopedics or other medical specialty that wants to measure and support compliance in treatment. However, even more interesting to me is the idea of a Force Fitness type of app that focuses on trainers and exercise. When you start to think about trainers need to monitor their client’s exercise habits it makes a lot of since. In fact, if played right, Force Fitness could become a network that connects trainers with those interested in finding a personal trainer. Considering the amount of money spent on exercise each year, this is a really tremendous opportunity.

It’s still early in the life of something like Force Therapeutics, but it’s a pretty interesting little insight into the future of how various apps could impact healthcare. One of the panel speakers at the mHealth Summit said that there were 17,000 healthcare apps on the market today. I’m not sure where he got his number, but no matter how you slice it that’s a lot of healthcare apps. Multiply an app like Force Therapeutics by 17,000 and you can see there’s a sea of change happening in the mobile health space.

December 6, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The Marvels of Technology Missing in Health IT

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I’m currently on the long flight from Las Vegas to New York City. The early flight time and long flight remind me why I prefer to just stay in Las Vegas with the occasional west coast trip, but I digress. In order to not lose an entire day of work on the airplane, I spent far too much for the overpriced internet service on my flight. As I’m traveling at 30,000 feet, it’s amazing to me that I’m connected nearly as good as when I’m sitting at home. Sure, in flight internet has been around for quite a while, but it still amazes me. What will amaze me even more is when the internet is free on every flight. Maybe pharma ads could pay for this too.

While experiencing this amazing connectivity, I can’t help but think of how poor so much of the connectivity in healthcare is. That’s right. We can find a way to offer internet connectivity at 30,000 feet in an aircraft moving hundreds of miles per hour and yet we can’t get connectivity to rural hospitals and other healthcare locations?

Plus, even speaking more broadly, I can access all of my normal services from an airplane, but for some reason I have no way to connect all of my healthcare data together.

Those in the industry realize the problems. The challenge of connecting all of our healthcare data from the various EHR (or maybe in this case EMR is appropriate) data silos is an academic exercise that’s easily accomplished. Hit any of the interoperability showcases at HIMSS or other healthcare IT events and you’ll see EHR software vendors communicating with each other and sharing data. Why then can’t we make this a reality?

The challenges are still the same they’ve been for a long time now: funding and politics.

I still cringe to think of the missed opportunity that ARRA and the HITECH Act could have provided in this regard. Instead of incentivizing use of an EMR, they should have and could have incentivized interoperability of healthcare data. The great part is that you’re not going to start exchanging data in healthcare without an EHR so you’d be getting more EHR software adopted and interoperability. Water under a bridge now I guess, but it keeps eating at me.

My biggest hope now is that a grass roots movement will form that will drive what we should be doing anyway. Everyone knows and understands the benefits to healthcare and the patient of exchanging healthcare data. It’s easy to make the case for how patient care improves and how duplicate costs are avoided. We need more people that are willing to hop on board interoperability of healthcare data cause it’s the right thing to do. Sure, we need to do it in a smart and reasonable way, but the ROI of healthcare data exchange goes well beyond dollars and cents. This ROI can’t be put on a spreadsheet, but instead will help us all sleep better at night.

Are there any movements like this out there? I can’t say I’ve seen any, but I’d love to see one. Then, we’d have a real beacon community that’s set on a hill because it earned and deserved the recognition as opposed to beacon communities paid for by tax payers.

Side Note: I’ll be in NYC this week at the Digital Health Conference and at the mHealth Summit in DC next week. I’m already planning to meet a number of my readers at these events, but I’d love to meet more.

November 30, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.