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The Pain of Recording Patient Risk Factors as Illuminated by Apixio (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on October 28, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The previous section of this article introduced Apixio’s analytics for payers in the Medicare Advantage program. Now we’ll step through how Apixio extracts relevant diagnostic data.

The technology of PDF scraping
Providers usually submit SOAP notes to the Apixio web site in the form of PDFs. This comes to me as a surprise, after hearing about the extravagant efforts that have gone into new CCDs and other formats such as the Blue Button project launched by the VA. Normally provided in an XML format, these documents claim to adhere to standards and offer a relatively gentle face to a computer program. In contrast, a PDF is one of the most challenging formats to parse: words and other characters are reduced to graphical symbols, while layout bears little relation to the human meaning of the data.

Structured documents such as CCDs contain only about 20% of what CMS requires, and often are formatted in idiosyncratic ways so that even the best CCDs would be no more informative than a Word document or PDF. But the main barrier to getting information, according to Schneider, is that Medicare Advantage works through the payers, and providers can be reluctant to give payers direct access to their EHR data. This reluctance springs from a variety of reasons, including worries about security, the feeling of being deluged by requests from payers, and a belief that the providers’ IT infrastructure cannot handle the burden of data extraction. Their stance has nothing to do with protecting patient privacy, because HIPAA explicitly allows providers to share patient data for treatment, payment, and operations, and that is what they are doing giving sensitive data to Apixio in PDF form. Thus, Apixio had to master OCR and text processing to serve that market.

Processing a PDF requires several steps, integrated within Apixio’s platform:

  1. Optical character recognition to re-create the text from a photo of the PDF.

  2. Further structuring to recognize, for instance, when the PDF contains a table that needs to be broken up horizontally into columns, or constructs such the field name “Diagnosis” followed by the desired data.

  3. Natural language processing to find the grammatical patterns in the text. This processing naturally must understand medical terminology, common abbreviations such as CHF, and codings.

  4. Analytics that pull out the data relevant to risk and presents it in a usable format to a human coder.

Apixio can accept dozens of notes covering the patient’s history. It often turns up diagnoses that “fell through the cracks,” as Schneider puts it. The diagnostic information Apixio returns can be used by medical professionals to generate reports for Medicare, but it has other uses as well. Apixio tells providers when they are treating a patient for an illness that does not appear in their master database. Providers can use that information to deduce when patients are left out of key care programs that can help them. In this way, the information can improve patient care. One coder they followed could triple her rate of reviewing patient charts with Apixio’s service.

Caught between past and future
If the Apixio approach to culling risk factors appears round-about and overwrought, like bringing in a bulldozer to plant a rosebush, think back to the role of historical factors in health care. Given the ways doctors have been taught to record medical conditions, and available tools, Apixio does a small part in promoting the progressive role of accountable care.

Hopefully, changes to the health care field will permit more direct ways to deliver accountable care in the future. Medical schools will convey the requirements of accountable care to their students and teach them how to record data that satisfies these requirements. Technologies will make it easier to record risk factors the first time around. Quality measures and the data needed by policy-makers will be clarified. And most of all, the advantages of collaboration will lead providers and payers to form business agreements or even merge, at which point the EHR data will be opened to the payer. The contortions providers currently need to go through, in trying to achieve 21st-century quality, reminds us of where the field needs to go.

The Pain of Recording Patient Risk Factors as Illuminated by Apixio (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on October 27, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Many of us strain against the bonds of tradition in our workplace, harboring a secret dream that the industry could start afresh, streamlined and free of hampering traditions. But history weighs on nearly every field, including my own (publishing) and the one I cover in this blog (health care). Applying technology in such a field often involves the legerdemain of extracting new value from the imperfect records and processes with deep roots.

Along these lines, when Apixio aimed machine learning and data analytics at health care, they unveiled a business model based on measuring risk more accurately so that Medicare Advantage payments to health care payers and providers reflect their patient populations more appropriately. Apixio’s tools permit improvements to patient care, as we shall see. But the core of the platform they offer involves uploading SOAP notes, usually in PDF form, and extracting diagnostic codes that coders may have missed or that may not be supportable. Machine learning techniques extract the diagnostic codes for each patient over the entire history provided.

Many questions jostled in my mind as I talked to Apixio CTO John Schneider. Why are these particular notes so important to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)? Why don’t doctors keep track of relevant diagnoses as they go along in an easy-to-retrieve manner that could be pipelined straight to Medicare? Can’t modern EHRs, after seven years of Meaningful Use, provide better formats than PDFs? I asked him these things.

A mini-seminar ensued on the evolution of health care and its documentation. A combination of policy changes and persistent cultural habits have tangled up the various sources of information over many years. In the following sections, I’ll look at each aspect of the documentation bouillabaisse.

The financial role of diagnosis and risk
Accountable care, in varying degrees of sophistication, calculates the risk of patient populations in order to gradually replace fee-for-service with payments that reflect how adeptly the health care provider has treated the patient. Accountable care lay behind the Affordable Care Act and got an extra boost at the beginning of 2016 when CMS took on the “goal of tying 30 percent of traditional, or fee-for-service, Medicare payments to alternative payment models, such as ACOs, by the end of 2016 — and 50 percent by the end of 2018.

Although many accountable care contracts–like those of the much-maligned 1970s Managed Care era–ignore differences between patients, more thoughtful programs recognize that accurate and fair payments require measurement of how much risk the health care provider is taking on–that is, how sick their patients are. Thus, providers benefit from scrupulously complete documentation (having learned that upcoding and sloppiness will no longer be tolerated and will lead to significant fines, according to Schneider). And this would seem to provide an incentive for the provider to capture every nuance of a patient’s condition in a clearly code, structured way.

But this is not how doctors operate, according to Schneider. They rebel when presented with dozens of boxes to check off, as crude EHRs tend to present things. They stick to the free-text SOAP note (fields for subjective observations, objective observations, assessment, and plan) that has been taught for decades. It’s often up to post-processing tools to code exactly what’s wrong with the patient. Sometimes the SOAP notes don’t even distinguish the four parts in electronic form, but exist as free-flowing Word documents.

A number of key diagnoses come from doctors who have privileges at the hospital but come in only sporadically to do consultations, and who therefore don’t understand the layout of the EHR or make attempts to use what little structure it provides. Another reason codes get missed or don’t easily surface is that doctors are overwhelmed, so that accurately recording diagnostic information in a structured way is a significant extra burden, an essentially clerical function loaded onto these highly skilled healthcare professionals. Thus, extracting diagnostic information many times involves “reading between the lines,” as Schneider puts it.

For Medicare Advantage payments, CMS wants a precise delineation of properly coded diagnoses in order to discern the risk presented by each patient. This is where Apixio come in: by mining the free-text SOAP notes for information that can enhance such coding. We’ll see what they do in the next section of this article.

Why PaaS is the Future of Healthcare

Posted on July 2, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest post by Anil Kottoor, president and CEO of MedHOK.

The need for improved data management and quality reporting is increasing exponentially as various healthcare reform measures take effect. From hospitals and physicians participating in Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans looking to improve their Star ratings, it seems that no healthcare sector is exempt from this litany of change.

Take for instance ACO participants. While the newly formed care model promises to improve care coordination and cut costs, doing so requires that providers invest in patient population management platforms capable of collecting and sharing patient information across the continuum of care.

Similarly, Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans are seeking out platforms capable of monitoring and tracking quality metrics. That is because under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS’) continually evolving Five Star Rating System, the pressure is on to improve quality or miss out on incentives such as year-round enrollment under a newly created special election period.

Despite the system-wide need for these advanced technology tools, few organizations have the resources necessary to invest in the hardware and software required to manage and track patient information and quality metrics. Small- to medium-sized businesses in particular are finding that they simply do not have the space or technical expertise to house and manage additional servers in-house.

As a result, many providers are seeking alternative solutions to their data management needs.

Software-as-a-Service Model

Perhaps the most well-known alternative to purchasing costly hardware and software is the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model, which provides organizations with the software they need via intuitive web interfaces. By eliminating the need for upfront hardware investments and ongoing maintenance costs, cloud-based software eliminates the hefty cost barrier that many providers face with their IT infrastructure investments.

Further, unlike traditional software, SaaS-based solutions do not require the purchase of multiple licenses across the organization. Most subscriptions can be tailored to the organization’s user needs and customized as staff size fluctuates. In addition, because software is hosted by a vendor or service provider and made available over the Internet, users can access information anywhere with Internet access.

However, while the SaaS model has experienced a rise in popularity over the last several years, the reality is that it does not provide the holistic approach to care and quality management that healthcare organizations desire. That is because many organizations must subscribe to a number of SaaS-based solutions to meet their data management needs. As a result, information is stored in multiple silos across their various vendor networks.

Platform-as-a-Service Model

This has given rise to the Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) model. In essence, PaaS provides users with both the SaaS-based solution and industry-specific application platform or operating system they need to manage data needs. For healthcare organizations that utilize various software solutions, this means that all of their solutions and the accompanying information can be found within the same user-friendly interface, thus removing the silos inherent in the SaaS model and streamlining information management and sharing.

In other words, PaaS provides all the benefits of SaaS with the added convenience of having all products within the same platform. Because these solutions are compatible with most existing software solutions, including electronic medical records (EMRs), they also eliminate the need to “rip and replace” systems that providers have grown comfortable using.

Unlike traditional IT infrastructures, PaaS solutions can be rapidly deployed to meet healthcare organizations’ comprehensive patient population management and data tracking needs. In fact, where traditional software solutions may take up to two years to implement, PaaS-based solutions can take as little as 90 days. Further, because PaaS providers manage both the software and the infrastructure, organizations can easily scale offerings to manage an increase – or decrease – in patient population.

Finally, because the PaaS models allows software to be deployed as individual modules or comprehensive end-to-end solutions, providers can easily add or remove products as the customer’s needs change. This also eliminates the need for investment in long-term technology strategy that may be outdated before the phase ever goes live.

The Future of Healthcare

The reality is that healthcare reform is rapidly changing the business of healthcare as new regulations and requirements continually roll out. To remain competitive in today’s market, health plans must remain extremely agile, and be willing to upgrade their software and reporting solutions before requirements are fully defined. However, doing so often requires a hefty upfront investment and a great deal of risk for those organizations that do not have the internal resources to manage the evolution of the required technology.

PaaS removes both of these obstacles and provides organizations with the agility and flexibility needed to rapidly respond to regulatory and market changes. Further, by leaving all of the heavy lifting up to a software vendor who specializes in holistic healthcare data management on a single platform, providers can focus their time and efforts on what matters most – the patient, who at the end of the day is the true consumer of healthcare.