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Benefits and Struggles of EMRs, and More – Around Healthcare Scene

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Are tablets going to take the place of traditional laptops and desktops? Well, Dr. Michael West seems to think so. He talks about his new-found love for his iPad mini, and how it fulfills all his current needs. Have you traded your desktop in for a tablet yet? The new Microsoft Surface is making me kind of want to!

Having a PHR on your phone doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, if your phone has a camera (what phone doesn’t nowadays?) you can create when quickly and easily. Here are five health-related snapshots you could keep on your phone to assist in a variety of situations.

If you have been following the Affordable Health Care Act, you’ll know that an optional Medicaid State Plan called Medicaid Health Homes was introduced. There are, of course, many questions that people have about this, including what kind of technology will be required for successful implementation. Lori Bernstein, president of GSI Health, addresses some questions and lays out the benefits that this new model has to offer in her guest post at EMR and EHR last week. what kind of technology will Medicaid Health Homes require to ensure successful implementation?

Paper to EMR is a necessary evil for for hospitals, therefore, it’s easy to justify the expense required to do so. But what about when you decide to switch EMRs. Is it justifiable? Not always. There is no ROI to switch from EMR and EMR, and it can be a big risk.

A current pilot program is currently underway to help identify high-risk pregnancies by using an EMR. This pilot program is being led by researchers and people from Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Population Health IT to find hints in a mother’s health history to help determine if her pregnancy is high-risk. It’s a slow-moving project, but may prove to be worth it if it helps get mothers the help they nee.d

June 9, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Rural Hospital EHR

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As I mentioned in my previous post on EHR Penalties and Meaningful Use Failure, I had a really good discussion with Stoltenberg Consulting about rural hospital EHR at HIMSS this year. While Stoltenberg no doubt works with hospital systems of every size, I could tell that they had a real affection for the rural hospital EHR challenge. Plus, it was great to be educated some more on the challenges rural hospitals face when it comes to meaningful use and EHR since I’ve been doing a lot more writing about it on my Hospital EMR and EHR website.

I collected a few observations from my chat that I think are worth talking about when it comes to the unique rural hospital EHR situation. One of those ideas is the challenge that rural hospitals have in providing EHR help desk support. It’s worth remembering that hospitals are 24/7 institutions that need 24/7 support in many cases. Now imagine trying to staff an EHR help desk for a small rural hospital. From what I’ve seen, most can barely have an IT support help desk available, let alone an EHR help desk. Stoltenberg Consulting wisely sees this as a great opportunity for EHR consults to provide this type of service to rural hospitals. If you spread the cost of a 24/7 EHR help desk across multiple hospitals, the costs start to make sense.

Another interesting observation was that most rural hospitals are mostly Medicare and Medicaid funded. I’m not an expert on the pay scales of rural America, but when you look at the costs of living in the rural areas you realize that they don’t need to make as much money to live. Plus, I imagine in some cases there just aren’t that many jobs available to them. If they aren’t making as much money, then they’re more likely to qualify for Medicare and Medicaid. Why does this matter?

The amount of Medicare a rural hospital has matters a lot since if they don’t show “meaningful use” of a “certified EHR” then they will incur the meaningful use penalties. It’s simple math to see that the more Medicare reimbursement you receive the larger the EHR penalty you’ll incur.

There’s something that doesn’t feel right about the rich hospitals who’ve likely implemented an EHR before the stimulus getting paid the EHR incentive money while rural hospitals who can barely afford to keep their doors open getting not only penalties, but large penalties because of their large Medicare reimbursement. It’s probably water under a bridge now, but I could see why Stoltenberg Consulting suggested that rural and community hospitals should have been given more time to show meaningful use of an EHR.

As I mentioned, I’m still learning about the rural hospital EHR space, but I found these points quite interesting. If you have a different view or have experience that differs, I’d love to hear about it in the comments. No doubt there are thousands of unique rural environments and I’d love to learn more about them and how they’re approaching EHR. Please share your experiences and thoughts in the comments.

April 2, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Pediatrics and EHR Incentive – Meaningful Use Monday

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I know that there are a number of pediatric doctors that read EMR and HIPAA along with a number of Pediatric EHR vendors. They could likely speak to the challenge of meaningful use and the EHR incentive money in much more depth than I. In fact, I hope they will chime in with the pediatric perspective on meaningful use and EHR money in the comments. As most of you know, I’ve always seen EMR and HIPAA as a forum for great discussion.

To start the discussion of pediatrics and EHR incentive money, I came across a couple tweets from AMIA 2012 that paint a very sad picture for most pediatricians when it comes to getting government money to help with their EHR implementation.


I wish that I had all the background on this tweet. However, the message is quite clear: it will be difficult for pediatrics to qualify for the EHR incentive money.

This second tweet puts some hard numbers on the pediatricians that could qualify for meaningful use:


This isn’t such a surprise since meaningful use has always been so primary care focused. Meaningful Use has come a long way to try and include more medical specialties (see my post on radiology meaningful use), but it’s hard to change something into something it wasn’t ever intended to accomplish.

I look forward to hearing pediatricians’ experience with meaningful use in the comments.

December 3, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Meaningful Use Infographic – Meaningful Use Monday

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It seems that everyone (including myself) love infographics. So, I was really glad to see that Greenway (Full Disclosure: They advertise on the site, but they didn’t ask me to post this. I found it on my own.) put together an Infographic with the Meaningful Use stats. They offer the following important details on the data for the meaningful use infographic:

  • Payment and registration statistics as of May 2012
  • Top Specialties participating in Medicare MU 2011
  • Meaningful Use attestations by Region 2011
  • Money available for Eligible Providers
  • Who is eligible to participate
  • Necessary steps to achieve Meaningful Use

August 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

How Should Locum Tenens Attest to Meaningful Use for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program? – Meaningful Use Monday

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Jessica Shenfeld, Esq. is the founding partner at The Law Office of Jessica Shenfeld, a boutique law firm that caters to physicians’ legal needs. She is also CEO of EHR Incentive Help, Inc., which helps physicians satisfy the Meaningful Use criteria and apply for the Medicare/Medicaid EHR Incentive Program benefits. For more information, visit http://jessicashenfeld.com/healthcare-legal-services/ehr-incentive/.

A reader asked about the best way for a locum tenens to attest to Meaningful Use for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program. As you may know, the phrase “locum tenens” is Latin for “place holder” or “substitute.” Locum tenentes physicians – like substitute teachers – may receive assignments that vary in length from a couple weeks to many months. As such, a locum tenens physician can work in multiple clinic/office locations over any given ninety-day period. This issue addressed below applies not only to locum tenens, but also to any doctor that works in multiple practice locations and wants to apply for the EHR Incentive Program as an individual eligible professional (EP). The reader’s question breaks down into two separate questions:
1. What location should the doctor use to demonstrate Meaningful Use?
2. What patient data should the doctor use to calculate the patient volume threshold – that at least 30% of the patients the EP treated were Medicaid patients?

The important point to remember is that doctors that work at more than one clinical practice site are NOT required to use data from all sites to support their demonstration of meaningful use and the patient volume threshold.

1. Meaningful Use: Under the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, an EP must have at least 50% of their of their patient encounters during the EHR reporting period at a practice/location or practices/locations equipped with certified EHR technology capable of meeting all of the meaningful use objectives. In lay terms, that means that in order to receive the Medicaid EHR incentive, a doctor must have had a certified EHR system installed (either adopted, implemented, or upgraded) in at least half locations where they practiced over any 90-day period in the prior calendar year.

2. Patient Volume: In order to be eligible for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, at least 30% of an EP’s patients over that same 90-day reporting period must have been Medicaid patients. This calculation is called the “patient volume” calculation, and it may be calculated differently in each state. The answer that applies in New York is that EPs may choose one (or more) clinical practice sites in order to calculate their patient volume. While the calculation does not need to include all practice sites, at least one of the sites from which patient data is drawn must have certified EHR technology. In other words, if an EP practices in two locations, one with certified EHR technology and one without, the EP must include the patient volume from the site that includes the certified EHR technology. In this example, the EP has the choice as to whether he wants to include the patient volume from the site without certified EHR technology to calculate patient volume calculation.

Although the reader asked about the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, a locum tenens can apply for the Medicare EHR Incentive Program using the framework outlined above with one exception: to establish Meaningful Use, at least half the practice sites where the locum tenens worked over a 90-day period in that same calendar year must have had a certified EHR system capable of meeting the Meaningful Use requirements. The patient volume analysis above applies to both Medicaid and Medicare.

August 6, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

First CMS Audits of Meaningful EHR Users – Meaningful Use Monday

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In response to the topic I covered in my post on gaming the EHR incentive money, I got the following message:

Although I suppose this is within the letter of the law, it seems like a highly suspect practice, especially when CMS has said on conference calls that people who take the first check and subsequently drop out will be the first in line for audits.

I found this reply quite interesting. I’d never heard CMS say on a conference call that the first meaningful use audits would be those who got the first EHR incentive check and then chose to stop with meaningful use. Are there other readers that have heard this as well or that have heard or read similar things?

I’m a little torn on the idea of meaningful use audits. I’m certain that CMS will be doing meaningful use audits. It’s just a matter of time and how they’ll complete the audits of meaningful use. However, I don’t think they’re tremendously motivated to really clamp down on auditing those that adopt EHR software. I don’t think they want the bad PR of practices that have adopted EHR software getting audited and losing their EHR incentive money. They want doctors to adopt EHR and they want to pay them the EHR incentive money.

I guess the one exception to the above comment is those that really aren’t adopting EHR software and instead are just trying to game the system. CMS will likely be happy to make an example out of those doctors. Add in that Medicaid is done by the states and doesn’t require meaningful use and I’ll be interested to see how many doctors get the first Medicaid EHR incentive check and bypass the rest of the checks. I think there’s a lot of funny business that’s going to happen with the Medicaid EHR incentive money.

What else have you heard about EHR Incentive money audits and Meaningful Use Audits? I’m going to try and get some people familiar with other healthcare audits to share some thoughts on how to prepare to deal with the future meaningful use audits.

July 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Medicaid Doctors and Dentists Gaming the EHR Incentive Program

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I guess I should have known that it would only be a matter of time before I’d see something like this come out. As best I can tell, Dentrix has partnered with Henry Schein to offer what they’re calling Dentrix Meaningful Use Access 7.6. Seems like Henry Schein is using the Dentrix names to get Dentists access to the Medicaid EHR incentive money. On face, I don’t see any problem with this.

Although, once you start to dig into it, it appears that Dentrix and Henry Schein are partnering to get Dentists the first Medicaid EHR incentive check without even implementing the EHR. You have to remember that the Medicaid EHR stimulus money doesn’t require you to show meaningful use of the EHR. You just have to acquire the EHR technology.

Look at some of the verbiage from the website for the program:

Definition of Adopt, Implement, or Upgrade:
For Medicaid, the eligible provider must Adopt, Implement, or Upgrade (AIU) certified EHR software. As posted on the CMS website, for AIU, a provider does not have to have installed certified EHR technology. The definition of AIU in 42 CFR 495.302 allows the provider to demonstrate AIU through any of the following:
*Acquiring, purchasing or securing access to certified EHR technology
*Installing or commencing utilization of certified EHR technology capable of meeting meaningful use requirements
or
*Expanding the available functionality of certified EHR technology capable of meeting meaningful use requirements at the practice site, including staffing, maintenance, and training, or upgrade from existing EHR technology to certified EHR technology per the ONC EHR certification criteria.

Thus, a signed contract indicating that the provider has adopted or upgraded would be sufficient.

To be honest, I’m torn between whether this is genius or filthy. According to the letter of the law, I don’t know of any reason that someone with the right Medicaid population can’t purchase an EHR like this for $2000 and then collect the EHR incentive money. The regulations don’t require them to do any more to collect the money. Although, that’s certainly not the intent of the EHR incentive money and definitely feels like their gaming the system if they do it with no intent to actually implement the EHR.

Another piece from the website:

While Henry Schein currently has no plans to pursue a Meaningful Use solution beyond Stage 1, Year 1 for Dentrix, we continue to monitor healthcare reform to determine what subsequent steps, if any, should be taken regarding Meaningful Use criteria and certification.

At least their up front with the Dentists that they’re not planning to go beyond meaningful use stage 1, but may change their minds. I’m sure this is music to ONC’s ears to hear that they’re only committing to meaningful use stage 1.

If your strategy is to just help these dentists get the first EHR incentive check, then why should you worry about MU stage 2. Wouldn’t you love to be a salesperson for this product? Here’s your pitch: Pay me $2000 for this EHR, go through 5 steps on the government website and you’ll get paid $21,250.00.

I wish I could see something legally wrong with this idea. Someone I talked to mentioned that even for the Medicaid EHR incentive money you have to check some box saying that you comply with the HIPAA requirements. Well, these clinics have to do that anyway. Many don’t, but they’ll check that box anyway thinking that they comply whether they do or not.

The biggest surprise for me might be that Henry Schein is willing to have their name associated with a program like this. I’ll be interested to see who else picks up on this glaring issue with the Medicaid EHR incentive and what ONC/CMS/HHS do to close it up (if they can).

June 29, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Medicaid EHR Incentive Attestation with Multiple Practices – Meaningful Use Monday

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Jessica Shenfeld, Esq. is the founding partner at The Law Office of Jessica Shenfeld, a boutique law firm that caters to physicians’ legal needs. She is also CEO of EHR Incentive Help, Inc., which helps physicians satisfy the Meaningful Use criteria and apply for the Medicare/Medicaid EHR Incentive benefits. For more information, visit www.jessicashenfeld.com.

A reader of this blog, a physician who worked throughout 2011 in one practice, dissolved her practice in November 2011, and immediately opened a new practice with a new Group NPI (National Provider Identifier) number the same month, November 2011. She now wants to qualify for the Medicaid EHR Incentive in 2012, but was told that she cannot do so using data from 2011 because the new practice only has two qualifying months in 2011 (November and December) and the first practice’s data is mute because it was dissolved. The issues boil down to two questions:
1) Can a closed practice’s data be used during Attestation or is the date mute?
2) Can an individual physician use patients from two different practices to satisfy the Medicaid Patient Volume requirement?

The technical answer to the first question is not straightforward – it depends on what your state says. While Medicaid is a federal program, each state is responsible for administering it and each state makes its own rules for eligibility that vary slightly. The threshold issue here is whether the applicant qualifies an Eligible Professional (“EP). Once the applicant is accepted as an EP, the state has vetted his/her eligibility and that EP’s patient data from the last calendar year can be used during Attestation. In New York, the provider described above would qualify as an Eligible Professional since continues to accept Medicaid patients. However, the final decision as to whether an individual qualifies as an EP is up to each state to decide. EP Eligibility is determined when Registration for the EHR Incentive is submitted. I recommend e-mailing your individual state representative for that answer, or just submitting the Registration and seeing whether it is accepted. Upon Registration, the physician is notified whether he or she was deemed an EP.

The answer to the second question – whether an individual physician can use patients from two different practices to satisfy the Medicaid Patient Volume requirement – is no. A provider cannot attest using two group NPI numbers. The Medicaid Patient Volume requirement imposes a threshold of 30%, calculated using a ratio where the numerator is the total number of Medicaid patient encounters over a continuous 90-day period in the most recent calendar year and the denominator is all the patient encounters over that same 90-day period. Luckily, all is not lost. Although in this case the provider cannot attest using the group’s aggregate patient volume, she has the option of attesting using her individual provider’s patient volume. When reporting on her individual data, the 90-day period can consist of 90 days from the first practice, or 90 days that span across both practices if there was no break in time between the two practices.

One final point – even if a provider applying for the Medicaid EHR Incentive is not deemed an EP in 2012, that provider can delay Registration to as late as 2016 without incurring any reduction in the incentive payment. Conversely, applicants for the Medicare EHR Incentive payment must attest by 2013 using data from a 90-day period in 2012 in order to receive the full benefit.

June 18, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

State of Utah Medicaid Breach Affects 800,000

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The reports and details around the State of Utah Medicaid Breach are starting to come out. An article in the Salt Lake Tribune gave the following numbers:

* 280,000 social security numbers were expose to hackers
* 500,000 less sensitive information like names and birth dates was exposed

This is interesting since the initial data breach number was at 24,000 Utahns on public health insurance were at risk. 800,000 is quite a few more people. The Tribune article says it touches 1 in every 6 Utahns. Compared with other breaches, that’s huge.

I know people love to read reports about healthcare data breaches (see one of my most popular posts on HIPAA Privacy Violations and HIPAA Lawsuits). It’s kind of like the rubber neckers on the freeway when there’s an accident. We have to turn our head to see what happened.

Here’s another part of the article linked above that provides more details.

So far, there have been no reports of people using the information to obtain fraudulent credit cards and loans.

But due to the breach’s scope and potential for harm, the FBI is now investigating.

“Computer intrusions are one of our top priorities,” said Greg Bretzing, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI’s Salt Lake City office. He declined to comment on the investigation or confirm the suspicions of state technology officials who traced the hacker, or hackers, to Eastern Europe.

Unfortunately, we’re really short on details of what actually happened. Not all hacks are created equal. In many cases, a computer gets hacked by a bot with no thought of what information is actually on the server. These bots just scan the internet for vulnerabilities and go through any doors that people left open. Often it’s just about the conquest and not about the information on the actual machine. Unless they give us more details, it will be hard to really know if this was intentional or coincidental.

Although, in this breach, a whole lot of social security numbers are at risk and their is a market for those since our whole financial life revolves around that number. I’ve had a number of Twitter conversations about the market for breached healthcare data. I’m still not convinced there is much of a market for it. I could imagine a scenario where a HUGE amount of aggregate healthcare data has some real value and could be sold to someone. I just don’t see the same value of an individual health record like there is with an individual social security number. Although, I’ll never underestimate the creativity of humans.

The State of Utah Medicaid is offering the standard 1 year identity theft service to those affected. Seems like identity theft services might be the business of the future since every breach turns to them to cover what happened. They haven’t offered any healthcare data identity theft services since I’ve never seen such a service. Is that service not available because it’s not really a problem? I know healthcare identity theft is an issue, but I don’t think those issues stem from breaches. I’d be interested if someone has information that says otherwise.

I’ll also add my regular disclaimer. this healthcare data breach has NOTHING to do with an EHR breach. I’m sure we’ll have a major breach of EHR data at some point in the future, but as of now insurance data and lost devices seems to dominate the healthcare breaches that I’ve seen.

April 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The Meaningful Use Stage 2 Proposed Rule: Highlights for Providers – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

Although I cannot claim to have read through the entire 455-page Proposed Rule on Stage 2 Meaningful Use, the fact that it is shorter than the 864-page rule that defined Stage 1 does not mean that it is simpler—it just requires less explanation since the basic structure of the program has not changed.

Rather than trying to summarize the Rule at this point, I am just going to point out some highlights gleaned from the presentations at HIMSS last week and from my quick skim through the document:

  • The meaningful use bar has been raised significantly for Stage 2.
  • The earliest that any providers will be subject to Stage 2 requirements is 2014; all EPs operate under Stage 1 requirements for their first 2 years of participation, regardless of when they first enter the program.
  • Most measures have higher thresholds, some have increased complexity, and new measures have been added.
  • Providers have fewer choices—there are 17 Core Measures that all providers must meet (subject to the same types of exclusions as Stage 1), all Stage 1 Menu Measures except syndromic surveillance become Core Measures, and providers will have to meet 3 of the 5 Stage 2 Menu Measures.
  • True interoperability is required—Stage 2 no longer asks providers to test their ability to exchange clinical data, but rather requires them to successfully exchange information on an ongoing basis across organizational and EHR vendor boundaries.
  • Providers will be accountable, to some degree, for actions by patients. For example, it will no longer be sufficient to make clinical information available to patients online—in Stage 2, a percentage of patients will have to actually access this information.
  • Providers will have the flexibility to purchase just the capabilities that they need to meet meaningful use—e.g., a chiropractor who does not prescribe will not have to have an EHR with ePrescribing capabilities, and a provider who is still at Stage 1 will not have to possess the meaningful use capabilities relevant to Stage 2 (until he gets to Stage 2).
  • Providers will report on 12 clinical quality measures, and there will be a broader array of measures from which to choose. One option under consideration would consolidate reporting for meaningful use and PQRS.
  • 2015 penalties can be avoided by demonstrating meaningful use in 2013, or for those who enter the program in 2014, by successfully attesting no later than October 3, 2014.

For more information, see the CMS Stage 2 Meaningful Use Fact Sheet.

February 27, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.