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Talking Digital Health at CES on MedHeads

Posted on January 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was invited by the good people at MedCity News to join their weekly MedHeads video chat to talk about Digital Health at CES. It was a great chat about some of the things myself and Stephanie Baum found at CES. Plus, Chris Seper and Neil Versel talked about what they saw watching from home. Check it out in the video embedded below.

Of course, the challenge was we only had 30 minutes to talk about the 2.5 million square feet of of exhibit space and ~20,000 new products that were unveiled at the show. Chew on those numbers a little bit.

Plus, while what’s happening on the show floor is great, there’s also hundreds of thousands of meetings that happen over dinners and drinks and that’s where the most exciting stuff happens. For example, Philips put on an incredible dinner Wednesday night of CES that had a whose who in the Digital Health space. I had a similar experience at the Digital Health Summit Speaker dinner last night. The bringing together of these like minded businesses is a really powerful thing.

You’ll never guess the theme of both dinner events: Collaboration! There was a real sense by those in attendance that we can’t accomplish what we need to alone. We need each other to be successful. The first step to making that happen is meeting each other and learn about what each of us is doing. CES presented an amazing opportunity for doing just that.

Amazingly, there are still 2 more days left of CES. Today and tomorrow I’m looking to hit more of the startup area (Eureka Park) and the main show floor at the Las Vegas convention center. Much more to come!

The ONC Health IT Complaint Form That Has No Teeth

Posted on September 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Neil Versel over on MedCityNews just reported that the ONC Healthcare IT Complain form that was announced on Friday is not working. If you go and visit the health IT complaint form, it just says “You are not authorized to access this page.”

While it’s quite ironic that the complaint form is down, I’m pretty sure it’s a simple fix. I’ve seen that error before on many websites and I’m guessing the ONC/HHS web people just need to make the form go live and then the page will load properly with the form.

I was discussing the irony of the form being down with Neil Versel on Facebook and I told him that I was more interested in what ONC is going to do with the complaints than whether the form was working or not. If ONC isn’t going to do anything with the complaints they receive, then the form might as well be down. Submitting a healthcare IT complaint to an organization that can do nothing about it might be a little cathartic, but not very much. In fact, over time it just leads to more anger that people have complained and nothing’s been done.

I asked Neil, “Do they [ONC] have any power to do anything?” He answered, “No. The HIT Safety Center they are working on is basically toothless.”

That’s been my impression as well. ONC would love to do something about it, but they don’t have many levers they can pull. The worst they could do is terminate an EHR’s certification, but they’ve been doing that already.

Neil and I did discuss that maybe all of the data they receive from their healthcare IT complaint form could be used to make a case for why they need more options available for them to punish bad actors in healthcare IT. As it is it seems the only thing they can offer healthcare IT complainers is some empathy. Of course, they can’t do that until they get their form working. Where’s the form I can fill out to let ONC know that their complaint form isn’t working?

$10 Finger Stick Blood Tests Illustrate New Quantified Future

Posted on July 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve often talked about the variety of health sensors that are quantifying everything about us and how that’s going to change healthcare as we know it. As we have more information about ourselves, it’s impossible for us to keep doing the same things we’ve been doing. One of the challenges we’ve faced with this change is that we need access to the blood to really do quality testing. No one wants to do a venous blood draw to regularly monitor their health data.

This is why I’m so interested in what the quite secretive Theranos is doing with their finger stick blood tests. Yesterday, the big news hit that Theranos got their first FDA clearance for their herpes simplex 1 virus IgG test. Although, as MedCityNews notes, this is the first of 100 pre-submissions they have underway with the FDA.

This is exciting news, but this part of the MedCityNews article is even more exciting for me:

Its HSV-1 test costs $9.07 – one of 153 tests the company says it makes that cost less than $10.

This is a great price point for a lab test and we’d all benefit from this massive decrease in price. I’m still not sure Theranos should have a $9 billion valuation. They still have a long way to go with the FDA, but if they’re able to execute then maybe that valuation isn’t that crazy after all.

Regardless of how Theranos does as a business, I think we’re going to see hundreds of companies like Theranos that continue to make testing more affordable. That’s going to change how we approach healthcare.