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Meaningful Use Playbook 2014: Overcoming Adversity – Breakaway Thinking

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The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
broncos
I apologize in advance, but I am still mourning the Super Bowl loss of the Denver Broncos. I can’t stop replaying each moment and thinking of alternative scenarios. What if Peyton Manning utilized a quick huddle instead of audibles and hand-signals? What if Denver’s defense had better protected Peyton? What if the Broncos had scored more than eight points?

Regardless of the what-ifs and wounds resulting from the loss, the team has to step up and prepare for the next season, if they want to finish at the top. In the healthcare world, providers must also change their playbook and approach, if they wish to capitalize on the next phase of Meaningful Use.

For the past year, providers have been scrambling to select, implement or optimize a new electronic health record system to meet federal requirements for Meaningful Use Stage 1. Adding to providers’ challenges is the evolving nature of the rules for achieving meaningful use incentives; federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is constantly updating the Meaningful Use Playbook. Similar to football players at the end of the season, providers are tired and wounded. However, they must be aware of and prepare to take on the new requirements for 2014. Otherwise, they risk future penalties and foregoing funds. To help healthcare providers prepare for this new season, here is a summary of changes taking effect this year.

  • Three-month reporting period
    All providers are now required, regardless of their stage of meaningful use, to demonstrate meaningful use for a three-month EHR reporting period. Medicare providers may elect to report clinical quality measures (CQM) for the entire year or select an optional, three-month reporting period for CQMs that is identical to their meaningful use reporting.
  • Exclusions and vital sign objectives
    All eligible professionals, eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals are now responsible for adhering to the latest changes in Meaningful Use Stage 1. This includes new requirements for electing exclusions toward menu objectives, age limits for recording and charting changes to vital signs, and new exclusions toward reporting height, weight and blood pressure.
  • View, download and transmit all health information or admissions online
    To better align with the new capabilities of certified EHR technology, CMS is replacing Meaningful Use Stage 1 objectives for accessing information online with the capacity to view, download and transmit this information.
  • Reporting of clinical quality measures
    All providers, regardless of their stage of meaningful use, must report on clinical quality measures to CMS. Eligible hospitals must report 16 of the 29 CQMs and eligible providers must report 9 of the 64 CQMs.(Source)

For providers making the leap to Stage 2 of meaningful use, this is only the beginning. Not only must they abide to the changes mentioned above, but they also need to plan and execute a strategy for integrating diverse IT systems and engaging patients. Neither are simple tasks. However, just as I believe that Peyton can shake this last performance and finish strong next year, I believe in the resiliency of providers too. With the right leadership and planning, they will take patient care to the next level.

Omaha! Omaha! Omaha!
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

February 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Opting Out of Meaningful Use Stage 2

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An old post about meaningful use stage 1 called Hardest Meaningful Use Measure recently was tweeted on @ehrandhit as a way to share from our vault of blog posts. Swithin Chandler saw the tweet and left a really interesting comment when it comes to how challenge meaningful use stage 2 is compared with meaningful use stage 1. Here’s part of his comment (emphasis added):

We’ve had relative success, and I stress relative, in making it as easy as possible in our EHR for our doctors to attest for Meaningful Use Stage 1 as one independent poll showed.

But with MU2 it is getting much harder. There are requirements that demand additional data entry, whether typing, clicking, or dictating that no EHR vendor can help doctors avoid.

My greatest concern is that doctors look at the changes needed to their workflow and decide the incentive is not worth it. I think there are some MU2 requirements that are very cool from a healthcare technology perspective (and as a patient), but one could certainly argue that giving doctors the features they’re asking for that are not in MU2 may be more valuable to them adopting EHR technology than some features they don’t want that are in MU2.

I think there’s a really good chance that huge numbers of doctors will opt out of meaningful use stage 2. As I recently discussed with our local congressman, the inverted incentives of meaningful use don’t make much sense. Usually when you require someone to do more, you compensate them more. In meaningful use as you are required to do more, they pay you less.

I do think the meaningful use penalties will encourage many doctors to press on through the various stages of meaningful use. However, there will also be a large group of doctors who decide that the cost of meaningful use stage 2 is more than the penalties for not being a meaningful user.

If you still don’t believe this is the case, last I checked only only a small handful of EHR vendors have become MU stage 2 certified. As Swithin says above, it’s not easy (and I suggest might be impossible) for an EHR vendor to make MU stage 2 easy for providers. No doubt this is a huge reason why many EHR vendors are still not MU stage 2 certified (or I think it’s officially called 2014 Edition EHR Products). Certainly all of them could have rushed the requirements for EHR certification, but implementing the EHR certification requirements without making life miserable for the end user is a challenging and possibly impossible task.

August 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Meaningful Use Will Force Doctors into ACOs

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They have made this mu reporting so bad….as our doctor says…they do not want doctor’s to practice by themselves…They are doing all they can to get them into ACOS…

The above is a quote from an EMR and HIPAA reader who emailed me about the meaningful use requirements. The conclusion was what really caught my attention. There are a number of questions that should be asked based on the statement above.

Does the government want doctors to not practice by themselves?
No one in government would say this and this isn’t their thought process at all. What they do want to see is a reform to how we pay for healthcare. If that means that doctors no longer practice on their own, I think they’re ok with that. I don’t think that’s the conclusion they’ve come to yet, but I think that’s what the reader is insinuating in the above comments. Personally I think it will be a tragedy for the physician community if we no longer have solo doctors and small group practices.

Does the government want all doctors in an ACO?
Absolutely. They are pushing accountable care organizations and anything that will get us away from the fee for service model that we have today. Right now they think that ACOs are the path to get to a pay for performance system. That means they need every doctor in an ACO for it to work.

Is meaningful use designed to be hard to encourage doctors to move to ACOs?
No. Meaningful use was designed to be as hard as they thought they could possibly make it and still get a large number of doctors to do meaningful use. Of course, meaningful use’s intent is all about creating some accountability for the EHR incentive money. However, there’s little doubt that some of the other government goals have been incorporated into meaningful use in the process.

My conclusion is that getting doctors into ACOs certainly wasn’t the intent of meaningful use, but it might well be the result. Maybe doctors aren’t fond of that result. This could be part of why 17% of providers got the first EHR incentive check and didn’t show meaningful use for the second EHR incentive payout.

July 10, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Missed Patient Portal Changes to MU Stage 1

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It’s fun to have this post on Monday since we did a few years of Meaningful Use Monday posts. This actually comes from a regular reader of EMR and HIPAA who works at an EHR vendor. He wanted to point out a change to meaningful use stage 1 that they’d missed. I expect there are likely others that might have missed this change as well.

Practices attesting stage 1 in 2014 for their year one or two must have the Patient Portal. ONC made a change and made the menu item Core for this in Stage 1. We thought it was stage 2 only. I reached out to a dozen or so REC consultants we work with and more than half of them had missed this point also.

CMS replaced the Stage 1 objectives for providing electronic copies of (CORE) and electronic access to health information (MENU) with the objective to provide patients the ability to view, download, or transmit their health information.

This means that any provider attesting to Stage 1 MU in 2014 (either Year 1 or Year 2) must attest to the objective: “Provide patients ability to view download and transmit their health information.” This will be a CORE measure and will require the portal.

More information is available on page 3 of this
http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/Stage1ChangesTipsheet.pdf

Looks like we’re going to have more patient portals in place really soon. Is your organization ready with a patient portal to meet this meaningful use measure?

July 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare Groups Want Meaningful Use Evaluated Before Stage 3

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Though the final rules for Meaningful Use Stage 3 aren’t due to take effect until 2016, ONC has already made the draft rules available for public comment.  And comments, to be sure, the agency is getting.

While various groups have chosen their own details to critique, the general consensus seems to be that ONC is getting ahead of itself and ought to give Meaningful Use Stage 1 and 2 a good hard look first.

Accordng to a nice summary from iHealthBeat, here’s where some of the major healthcare groups stand:

* The American Hospital Association is recommending that ONC fund a comprehensive evaluation of MU generally, and while it does, hold off on finalizing Stage 3 recommendations.

*  CHIME, too, is asking ONC to evaluate the existing Meaningful Use program to decide whether achieving stage 3 is realistically possible by 2016.

* The Federation of American Hospitals is also arguing that ONC needs to evaluate current Meaningful Use requirements.  Also, in its letter to ONC, the group argues that the existing structure of two years per stage doesn’t cut it.

* The AMA weighed in with its own recommendation that ONC evaluate Meaningful Use as is before moving ahead. It also suggested changing some thresholds to  make them more reachable; greater flexibility in program requirements; change the certification process to address usability; and improve HIT’s capability to share patient data.

Personally, I think the idea of doing an extensive Meaningful Use evalulation sounds like a good one, and I hope ONC actually does so.  When you’re setting new standards that affect so many providers, why not gather some data on how existing standards work?

January 16, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Meaningful Use Potpourri – Meaningful Use Monday

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We’ve been publishing Meaningful Use Monday for exactly two years today. Most of the posts have been written by the wonderful Lynn Scheps from SRSsoft and I think they represent a wonderful asset to those interested in meaningful use. That’s close to hundred posts on the subject of meaningful use and EHR incentive money. Hopefully readers have found it as useful as I have in understanding the complexities of meaningful use.

Considering how much we’ve posted about meaningful use, I think it’s time to move meaningful use out of a featured space on the site. Don’t get me wrong, I’m sure there are many more meaningful use posts to come. In fact, it’s likely a post a week will still be about meaningful use and the EHR incentive money in one way or another. However, I hope that we can also help many doctors move past meaningful use to actually meaningfully using EHR and other healthcare technology. For example, I’m planning a series of posts on the benefits of EHR in the current environment. I expect it to drive some really interesting conversation.

Before I end the Meaningful Use Monday series to a more random assortment of meaningful use posts, I thought I’d provide a potpourri of meaningful use thoughts. I think you’ll find them interesting.


This is an interesting title since the article says that most won’t be able to show meaningful use and then goes on to list the statistics for how many doctors are using EHR. So, they’re using EHR, but they don’t have the capability to show meaningful use? To me EHR adoption is the more important number. I also like that EHR vendors have all applied the same CCD standard for data portability. I’m ok if many doctors forgo meaningful use. Although, we’ll see how that plays out if the penalties indeed go into effect.


This is music to my ears. I’ve been preaching this message for a long time. The odd part is that this article references the same studies and data as the first. What is clear from the numbers is that EHR adoption is up. That’s a good thing for healthcare since we need widespread EHR adoption to take the next step to technology adoption in healthcare.


I don’t think this is true, depending on how you define “apply.” I know very few doctors who have applied to meaningful use and not gotten paid. If you know of stories that say otherwise, I’d love to hear them. This is particularly true in meaningful use stage 1. We might see more meaningful use payment rejections in stage 2 and 3, but so far the money has basically flowed out. I think this is by design. The worst thing for ONC would be many doctors working towards meaningful use and then not getting paid.


Yep, meaningful use stage 2 is still getting tweaked. It’s hard to keep up.


Almost a third of the way there. I love this “shovel ready” part of the ARRA economic stimulus package. Makes me laugh to think about it.

December 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Final Rule for Stage 2 Brings Some Changes to Stage 1 – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

Although Stage 2 requirements don’t become effective until 2014, the Final Rule for Stage 2 contains some changes that apply—or can apply—to providers before then, and some that will apply to all physicians in 2014, even those still in Stage 1. These changes fall into 3 categories in terms of timing:  those that are effective in 2013, those that can be adopted in 2013 at the physician’s discretion, and those that are implemented in 2014.

Effective 2013:

  • Conducting a test of the EHR’s capability to exchange clinical information (Stage 1 Core Measure 14) will be dropped from the requirements. It will be replaced in Stage 2 by measures that require actual and ongoing exchange of information.
  • A new exclusion for the ePrescribing requirement is being added for physicians who have no pharmacy within 10 miles that accepts electronic prescriptions.

At Physician’s Discretion in 2013 (and required in 2014):

  • The Vital Signs measure will be restructured to separate the reporting of height and weight from the reporting of blood pressure. This is good news for those specialists who consider some, but not all 3 of the vital signs, relevant to their practice. Along with this change in the measure are revised minimum ages: blood pressure reporting will be required for patients age 3 and over instead of age 2, and height (or length) and weight will be required for all patients, even those under 2.
  • An alternate calculation for CPOE will help physicians—again, likely specialists—who do not prescribe frequently enough to meet the Stage 1 (30%) threshold. The denominator will be limited to “medication orders created by the EP during the EHR reporting period,” instead of “unique patients with at least one medication in their medication list.”

Effective 2014:

  • Currently, in Stage 1, if a provider attests to an exclusion for any menu measures, these measures can be counted towards the menu requirement. In Stage 2, this will no longer be true—excluded measures will not satisfy the menu requirement if there are other measures on which the provider could report instead. This will also apply to providers who are still reporting under Stage 1 in 2014—a change which those providers will likely perceive as inequitable since it did not apply to the earlier attesters. Those physicians who qualify for multiple exclusions—specialists, once again—will find that the menu set is really no longer a menu, as they will be left with few, if any, choices. 

So, while physicians do not have to focus on Stage 2 just yet, they should consider whether they might benefit from the 2013 changes described above.

September 10, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

MU Attestation Audits – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

By definition, attestation is based on the honor system—that is, at least until you find yourself the subject of an audit. CMS has launched its anticipated program, and some physicians who have received an EHR incentive payment recently received a letter from the designated auditing firm, Figloiozzi and Company

Although there is no way to predict which physicians will be audited, providing the information requested should not be too onerous a task for those “lucky” ones who are tapped. Providers are being asked to show proof that they possess a certified EHR and to substantiate the data they reported for the core and menu measures—specifically, via “a report from their EHR system that ties to their attestation.” Since all certified EHRs generate an automated measure calculation report and a clinical quality measure report, that documentation should be readily accessible. It would not surprise me if they are also asked to provide documentation of the security and risk analysis that the practice conducted to ensure HIPAA compliance. For suggestions regarding the type of data to retain to support your attestation, see the Meaningful Use Monday post, MU Attestation: Save Your Documentation.

Based on material published by the auditors and by CMS on its EHR Incentives website, it does not seem that the audits will be so detailed as to require site visits or reviews at the patient chart-level. My sense is that CMS is looking to identify failures to comply with the major requirements—adopting and using a certified EHR to meet the meaningful use measures and reporting accurately on the data generated by that EHR. 

(If you have been audited and would like to share your experience, please post a comment.)

July 30, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Hospital CIO Interview – Will Weider

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When I first started blogging, I came across a hospital CIO blog called Candid CIO that is written by Will Wieder, CIO of Ministry Health Care. Six years later he’s still my favorite hospital CIO blogger out there. My only complaint is that he doesn’t blog enough (understandably so). I’ve never had a chance to meet Will in person, but I hope to one day have that opportunity.

Will recently commented on one of my posts. After seeing his comment I had the genius idea to ask him for an interview. I’m not sure why I hadn’t thought of it before since we go so far back, but when you see the content of the interview you’ll see why I’m planning to reach out to more CIOs. I hope you enjoy Will’s comments as much as I did.

You have a great CIO blog at CandidCIO.com, what made you start blogging and why do you continue blogging today?
Thanks. I originally started the blog for two reasons. Firstly, I follow tech trends and like to try anything that is emerging. So, I started this blog a long time ago. Secondly, I always desired an outlet where I could express my views of healthcare IT. At the time I started the blog a lot of the HIT press was driving me crazy with superficial stories that didn’t explore difficult questions. One would get the impression that every single IT project ever started was a worthwhile success. So, I wanted to be able to challenge conventional wisdom.

Today there are many great blogs and thousands of voices on Twitter.

Do you think other CIO’s should blog?
I hope that they do, because we have a lot to learn from each other. But it does take time, I have found it impossible to post consistently these days. I am big fan of tech blogger, John Gruber. His posts are almost always two or three sentences. I used to always write long posts. Recently I am mostly writing shorter posts that matches what I would like to read, given my attention span.

How do you deal with the challenge of a blog and Twitter account making you “too” accessible as a CIO?
People generally respect boundaries. Part of my life is to ignore cold callers (unless they are serendipitously offering something on my priority list), I would love to get back to every person that wants to meet me for lunch and talk about my organization’s prioirites, but there isn’t enough time in the day to respond – let alone have all those meetings. I have met a lot of great people on Twitter and I have hired a few, all of those have turned out great.

What’s the biggest issue on your plate as a hospital CIO today?
Managing demand. The best part of being a health care CIO is that there are so many great new solutions that solve business problems, especially in the clinical arena. The worst part is that everybody wants those solutions and they want them now. Even if senior management makes some hard decisions about priorities, the managers that submitted projects that didn’t make the priority list are disappointed and frustrated. I would feel the same way (and do feel the same way when my projects don’t make the cut).

What are the top 3 hospital CIO issues you can see on the horizon?
1. Hone project management so projects are done more quickly and successfully (see above)
2. Security
3. IT Operations – as our doctors and nurses become increasingly more dependent on IT we need to improve our processes that drive system availability and response time.
4. Consumerization of enterprise IT (rise of the iPads)

How has meaningful use impacted your hospital for good and bad?
I have heard a lot of people state that Meaningful Use was a clinical project and that they expected the results to be really meaningful. That wasn’t our experience. We were already working on meaningful clinical IT projects. Much of the objectives were things we had done or started. Our focus was to stay the course and make a few modifications so we hit every objective as written.

Our internal customers (our management team, physicians, nurses, etc.) would probably say that Stage 1 Meaningful Use has been a non-event for them. I like to think that is a testament to the many things that we were doing right. For example, our hospital in Weston, WI is all-digital. There are no charts on the floor; there is not even a file room. It is the only Wisconsin hospital (except a Children’s Hospital) recognized by Leapfrog Group as having fully met the CPOE leap. So, Meaningful Use was mostly about taking the time to properly measure everything and create quality measures to the appropriate specification.

Do you follow the All in One or Best of Breed software approach and why?
I would have to describe us as a Best of Breed IT organization. Many of our admissions come from Marshfield Clinic doctors. The Marshfield Clinic developed their own EHR and have been perfecting it over the last 20 years. About 5 years ago we made the decision to use the Marshfield Clinic EHR in our Ministry clinics and to interface that EHR to our hospitals.

Sharing that EHR was in the best interest of our patients. Our primary care doctors, our hospitals and Marshfield Clinic specialists are all contributing to a common patient record. Once we made that decision for our patients, it was no longer possible to have an All in One solution (Marshfield Clinic does not have a Hospital Information System).

If you could snap your fingers and change one thing about healthcare, what would it be?
Reduce costs. Quality improves year over year as medical knowledge increases, processes improve and new technologies (including information technologies) evolve. But the cost here in the US continues to skyrocket (18% of GDP, double that of the second most expensive industrialized nation). Frustratingly, there isn’t even agreement on why the cost is increasing. I want healthcare to be affordable to the working families here in Wisconsin.

Are you seeing and experience an experienced health IT staff shortage? How do you suggest people without healthcare experience get a health IT job?
More so in the technical areas where we are competing with all industries. We are able to recruit and/or develop applications analyst.

What’s your most important IT project today?
Ministry Health Care was traditionally a less consolidated organization that had 7 or 8 different IT departments. As a result of that we still have a lot of fragmented systems, 740 different applications running on 1,500 servers. Our environment is too complex and it makes us too inefficient. We have plans to greatly simplify that environment. But, it will take us several years and scores of projects to get there. This is paramount to our competitiveness.

From a more short-term perspective this ICD-10 thing is a complicated beast that must go well. After looking at the cost for our organization, and then extrapolating that to the entire industry, I don’t see how the money spent will be worth the value received.

Which IT project doesn’t get enough attention and why?
The need to abandon Windows XP by the time Microsoft ends support in April of 2014 is a ticking time bomb and I am not hearing anyone talk about it. We will spend more time and money (about $5M) on this than we spent working on Stage 1 of Meaningful Use.

Any final thoughts?
Two things: Firstly, I have a great job and I work with incredible people in IT and throughout Ministry. Secondly, the Packers are going to win the Super Bowl this year.

John’s Note: I’ll forgive him for his Packer fandom which is understandable for where he lives. Personally I just hope my Dolphins can turn things around.

July 26, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Multi-Site Providers Who Don’t Have Certified EHR in All Locations – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

A reader asked how a physician meets meaningful use when some of his encounters occur at a nursing home where there is no certified EHR. Specifically, she wanted to know if the physician was expected to bring his own EHR (hardware and software) to the facility to document encounters there. The answer is “no”—he limits his reporting to encounters that take place in the clinic setting. 

A somewhat similar situation is faced by physicians who are affiliated with two (or more) different practices, where not all of the practices(s) are equipped with certified ambulatory EHR technology. In this case, the physician reports on the encounters where a certified EHR is available. The only caveat is that to be eligible for an EHR incentive, the physician must have at least 50% of his encounters at location(s) that do have a certified EHR.

If you have other questions you’d like answered about meaningful use or the EHR incentive money. Please send in your question on our contact us page.

July 16, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.