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Eyes Wide Shut – Managing Multi-EMR Meaningful Use Stage 2 Is Hard

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Most discussions on Meaningful Use (MU) seem to focus on a single healthcare provider organization (acute or ambulatory), with a single EMR, and a single Medical Record Number (MRN) pool generating unique patient identifiers. Even in that context, the complaints of the difficulties of successfully implementing the technology and obtaining the objectives are deafening. How daunting might those challenges seem, multiplied across a large integrated delivery network (IDN), attempting to make enterprise-wide technology and operational process decisions, in alignment with MU incentive objectives?

Imagine you are an IDN with 9 hospital facilities, sharing a single EMR. You also have 67 ambulatory practices, with 7 additional EMRs. You’ve made the progressive choice to implement a private health information exchange (HIE) to make clinical summary data available throughout the IDN, creating a patient-centric environment conducive to improved care coordination. To properly engage patients across the IDN and give them the best user experience possible, you’ve purchased an enterprise portal product that is not tethered to an EMR, and instead sources from the HIE. And because you’ve factored the MU incentive dollars into the budget which enabled these purchasing decisions, there is no choice but to achieve the core and select menu measures for 2014.

It is now October 2013. The first quarter you’ve chosen to gather Stage 2 attestation data starts on April 1, 2014. All your technology and process changes must be ready by the data capture start date, in order to have the best opportunity to achieve the objectives. Once data capture begins, you have 90 days to “check the box” for each MU measure.

Tech check: are all the EMRs in your IDN considered Certified Electronic Health Records Technology (CEHRT) for the 2014 measures?

Your acute EMR is currently 2 versions behind the newly-released MU 2014-certified version; it is scheduled to complete the upgrade in November 2013. Your highest-volume ambulatory EMR is also 2 versions behind the 2014-certified version, and it cannot be upgraded until March 2014 due to vendor resource constraints. Your cardiology EMR cannot be upgraded until June due to significant workflow differences between versions, impacting those providers still completing Stage 1 attestation. One of your EMRs cannot give you a certification date for its 2014 edition, and cannot provide an implementation date for the certified version. The enterprise portal product has been 2014-certified as a modular EMR, but the upgrade to the certified version is not available until February 2014.

Clearly, your timeline to successfully test and implement the multitude of EMR upgrades required prior to your attestation date is at risk.

Each EMR might be certified, but will it be able to meet the measures out of the box?

Once upgraded to the 2014 version, your acute EMR must generate Summary of Care C-CDA documents and transmit them to an external provider, via the Direct transfer protocol. Your ambulatory EMRs must generate Transition of Care C-CDA documents and use the same Direct protocol to transmit. But did you purchase the Direct module when you signed your EMR contract, or maintenance agreement?

Did you check to see whether the Direct module that has been certified with the EMR is also an accredited member of DirectTrust?

Did you know that some EMRs have Direct modules that can ONLY transmit data to DirectTrust-accredited modules?

You determine your acute EMR will only send to EMRs with DirectTrust-accredited modules, and that you only have a single ambulatory EMR meeting this criteria. That ambulatory EMR is not the primary target for post-acute care referral.

You have no control over the EMRs of providers outside the IDN, who represent more than 20% of your specialist referrals.

Your 10% electronic submission of Summary of Care C-CDA documents via Direct protocol measure is at risk.

Is your organization prepared to manage the changes required to support the 2014 measures?

This is a triple-legged stool consideration: people, process, and technology must all align for change to be effective. To identify the process changes required, and the people needed to support those processes, you must understand the technology that will be driving this change. Of all the EMRs in your organization, only 2 have provided product specifications, release notes, and user guides for their 2014-certified editions.

Requests for documentation about UI, data, or workflow changes in the 2014 versions are met with vague responses, “We will ask product management and get back to you on that.” Without information on the workflow changes, you cannot identify process changes. Without process change recognition, you cannot properly identify people required to execute the processes. You are left completely in the dark until such time as the vendors see fit to release not only the product, but the documentation supporting the product.

Clearly, your enterprise program for Meaningful Use Stage 2 health IT implementation and adoption is at risk.

What is the likelihood that your Meaningful Use Stage 2 attestation will be a successful endeavor for the enterprise?

As a program manager, I would put this effort in flaming red status, due to the multitude of risks and external dependencies over which the IDN organization has zero control. I’d apply that same stoplight scorecard rating to the MU Stage 2 initiative. There is simply too much risk and too many variables outside the provider’s control to execute this plan effectively, without incurring negative impacts to patient care.

The ONC never said Meaningful Use would be easy, but does it have to be this hard?

October 2, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

Eyes Wide Shut – Teaching to the Meaningful Use Stage 2 Test

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According to Twitter analytics, one of my more engaging tweets recently stated that Meaningful Use is stifling innovation by requiring that health IT vendors and healthcare providers employ very specific tactics to capture and report on clinical data capture and interoperability standards compliance – ostensibly to engage and empower the patient, and improve coordination of care between providers. Of course, I said it much more succinctly than that. In effect, conforming to the Meaningful Use Stage 2 attestation measures is akin to “teaching to the test”:

Here’s a real-world example of what it means to “teach to the test” of Meaningful Use. In order to qualify for CMS incentive dollars, Meaningful Use Stage 2 Year 1 patient engagement measures must be met, with auditable data captured, in a 90-day contiguous period in 2014. An eligible provider (EP) must demonstrate that 50% of all patients with encounters during that time period have online access to their clinical summary within 4 days of the data becoming available to the provider. 5% of those patients must access the clinical information within the 90 days, and 5% of those patients must leverage secure messaging to communicate relevant health information with the provider. Finally, the MU-certified EMR must proffer patient-specific education materials for 10% of the patients seen during that time.

What I believe the ONC had in mind when they crafted these measures: engaged patients who will log in to their portal after each encounter, review the findings and lab results to assess their own progress and outcomes, read or listen to the condition-specific educational materials provided that resonate with them, and ask more meaningful questions of their providers as a result of this new-found, data-enabled empowerment. That is why they categorize these measures as “patient engagement”, right?

Wrong. This is what “patient engagement” looks like, from the EMR implementation, Meaningful Use-consultant, EP business process standpoint.

First, establish the bare minimum thresholds for meeting the measures. If the EP saw 1000 patients during the same 3-month period the previous year, your denominator is 1000; calculate the numerator for each measure based on that. So, we need 500 patients to have access to their clinical data online; 50 patients must access their information; 50 patients must communicate with their provider via secure messaging; 100 patient encounters must prompt specific educational opportunities.

To meet the 500 patients with online access to their clinical data, patient portal software is preloaded with patient demographic accounts, based on the registration data already available in the EMR. An enrollment request is emailed to the patient or authorized representative (assuming an email address is available in their demographic information). The EMR captures the event of sending this email, which contains the information about how to enroll and access the patient’s medical records via the portal. This measure is met, without the patient acknowledging the portal’s existing, and without any direct communication between provider and patient.

The medical records view and secure messaging measures can be met simultaneously, in a matter of days, by planning to add a few extra minutes to each encounter for 50 patients’ worth of appointments. The EMR has already triggered an email with portal enrollment information to each of the patients in the waiting room on a given day. As the medical assistant (MA) is taking vital stats, she asks whether the patient has enrolled in the portal. It’s likely the patient has not; the MA hands the patient a tablet and has him log in to his email, and walks him through the portal enrollment and initial login process. Once logged in, the MA directs the patient to click the link to view his medical record. That click is recorded, and the “view” measure is met; whether a CCD or C-CCD is actually displayed is irrelevant to the attestation data capture.

Having demonstrated how a patient can view his record, the MA then asks the patient to go into the portal’s message center, to send a test communication to the provider. The patient completes the required fields, and the MA prompts him with a generic health-related question to type into the body of the message. Once the patient hits “Send”, the event is recorded, and the “secure messaging” measure is met.

For all patients, whether portal-users or not, a new process begins when the MA finishes, the provider enters the room and begins her evaluation of each of the 100 patients required to meet the education measure. As the patient talks, the provider is clicking through EMR workflow screens, recording the encounter data. The EMR occasionally prompts with a dialogue box indicating educational materials are available for patients with this diagnosis code, or this lab result. Each dialogue box prompt is recorded by the EMR; the “patient-specific education” measure is met, whether the provider acts on the prompt and discusses or distributes the educational information or not.

To put it simply: the patient never has to log in to a portal to meet the 50% online availability requirement, they don’t have to actually view their records to meet the 5% view requirement, they don’t have to have an actual message exchange with their provider to meet the 5% communication requirement, and they don’t have to receive any tailored materials to meet the 10% education requirement. Once those clicks have been recorded, the actions never have to be repeated; meaningful and ongoing patient engagement is not needed to meet the attestation requirements and receive the incentive dollars.

In a previous post, I introduced my interpretation of the difference between the spirit and letter of the Meaningful Use “law”. By teaching to the test, we’re addressing the letter of the law, only, in its narrowest interpretation. When will we incent vendors and providers to go above and beyond and find ways to truly engage patients in meaningful ways, empowering them with accurate, timely data access and tools to analyze it?

September 30, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

Meaningful Use Stage 3 Retires Measures that Doctors Don’t Do

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The other day I was spending some time going through the proposed meaningful use stage 3 measures. It’s quite an experience if you haven’t done this already.

As I was going through each of the measures I realized something that could be a little troubling. In a number of cases, they are proposing that certain measures should be retired from the meaningful use attestation process because essentially those measures have reached a percentage in meaningful use stage 2 that they’re fully adopted. I think this is generally a good idea. We don’t need clinics and hospitals reporting information just to report information.

Although, I did find a surprising trend when it came to the measures that were being retired in meaningful use stage 3. Almost all of the measures (possibly all, but I didn’t dig that deep) were measures that were done by someone other than the doctor. A few examples were vitals, smoking status, and demographics. I guess in some cases the doctor might enter these, but you can see how the vitals were likely entered by a nurse or MA and not the doctor.

On the one hand this is a really great thing. That means that in the previous meaningful use stages, the biggest burden was placed on someone other than the doctor while the doctor was only required to have a much smaller percentage. Unfortunately this means that the higher percentages required in meaningful use stage 3 put the burden largely on the backs of physicians.

February 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Important Dates in the Life of a Meaningful EHR User – Meaningful Use Monday

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Here’s a look at some of the important dates to know for those looking to attest for Meaningful Use:

October 3, 2012: Last date to start the 90-day reporting period to earn an $18,000 EHR incentive payment for 2012, and to be eligible for the maximum total of $44,000. (The potential total drops to $39,000 in 2013.) Physicians do not have to be registered by this date—they can register at any time before they attest.

January 1, 2013: First day of the 365-day, 2013 reporting period for any provider who earned his/her first incentive payment in 2011 or 2012.

February 28, 2013: Last date to register and to attest for the 2012 EHR incentive. (Happily, no one has to spend New Year’s Eve attesting!) But remember, the entire reporting period has to have occurred within 2012.

October 3, 2013: For EPs whose first EHR payment year will be 2013, last day to start the 90-day reporting period and earn a $15,000 2013 incentive.

2013: EPs who successfully demonstrate meaningful use in 2013 will not be subject to the 2015 payment adjustment.

October 1, 2014: For EPs whose first incentive year is 2014, this is the last date to submit a successful meaningful use attestation and avoid the 2015 payment adjustment.

October 8, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

How Should Locum Tenens Attest to Meaningful Use for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program? – Meaningful Use Monday

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Jessica Shenfeld, Esq. is the founding partner at The Law Office of Jessica Shenfeld, a boutique law firm that caters to physicians’ legal needs. She is also CEO of EHR Incentive Help, Inc., which helps physicians satisfy the Meaningful Use criteria and apply for the Medicare/Medicaid EHR Incentive Program benefits. For more information, visit http://jessicashenfeld.com/healthcare-legal-services/ehr-incentive/.

A reader asked about the best way for a locum tenens to attest to Meaningful Use for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program. As you may know, the phrase “locum tenens” is Latin for “place holder” or “substitute.” Locum tenentes physicians – like substitute teachers – may receive assignments that vary in length from a couple weeks to many months. As such, a locum tenens physician can work in multiple clinic/office locations over any given ninety-day period. This issue addressed below applies not only to locum tenens, but also to any doctor that works in multiple practice locations and wants to apply for the EHR Incentive Program as an individual eligible professional (EP). The reader’s question breaks down into two separate questions:
1. What location should the doctor use to demonstrate Meaningful Use?
2. What patient data should the doctor use to calculate the patient volume threshold – that at least 30% of the patients the EP treated were Medicaid patients?

The important point to remember is that doctors that work at more than one clinical practice site are NOT required to use data from all sites to support their demonstration of meaningful use and the patient volume threshold.

1. Meaningful Use: Under the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, an EP must have at least 50% of their of their patient encounters during the EHR reporting period at a practice/location or practices/locations equipped with certified EHR technology capable of meeting all of the meaningful use objectives. In lay terms, that means that in order to receive the Medicaid EHR incentive, a doctor must have had a certified EHR system installed (either adopted, implemented, or upgraded) in at least half locations where they practiced over any 90-day period in the prior calendar year.

2. Patient Volume: In order to be eligible for the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, at least 30% of an EP’s patients over that same 90-day reporting period must have been Medicaid patients. This calculation is called the “patient volume” calculation, and it may be calculated differently in each state. The answer that applies in New York is that EPs may choose one (or more) clinical practice sites in order to calculate their patient volume. While the calculation does not need to include all practice sites, at least one of the sites from which patient data is drawn must have certified EHR technology. In other words, if an EP practices in two locations, one with certified EHR technology and one without, the EP must include the patient volume from the site that includes the certified EHR technology. In this example, the EP has the choice as to whether he wants to include the patient volume from the site without certified EHR technology to calculate patient volume calculation.

Although the reader asked about the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, a locum tenens can apply for the Medicare EHR Incentive Program using the framework outlined above with one exception: to establish Meaningful Use, at least half the practice sites where the locum tenens worked over a 90-day period in that same calendar year must have had a certified EHR system capable of meeting the Meaningful Use requirements. The patient volume analysis above applies to both Medicaid and Medicare.

August 6, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

MU Attestation Audits – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

By definition, attestation is based on the honor system—that is, at least until you find yourself the subject of an audit. CMS has launched its anticipated program, and some physicians who have received an EHR incentive payment recently received a letter from the designated auditing firm, Figloiozzi and Company

Although there is no way to predict which physicians will be audited, providing the information requested should not be too onerous a task for those “lucky” ones who are tapped. Providers are being asked to show proof that they possess a certified EHR and to substantiate the data they reported for the core and menu measures—specifically, via “a report from their EHR system that ties to their attestation.” Since all certified EHRs generate an automated measure calculation report and a clinical quality measure report, that documentation should be readily accessible. It would not surprise me if they are also asked to provide documentation of the security and risk analysis that the practice conducted to ensure HIPAA compliance. For suggestions regarding the type of data to retain to support your attestation, see the Meaningful Use Monday post, MU Attestation: Save Your Documentation.

Based on material published by the auditors and by CMS on its EHR Incentives website, it does not seem that the audits will be so detailed as to require site visits or reviews at the patient chart-level. My sense is that CMS is looking to identify failures to comply with the major requirements—adopting and using a certified EHR to meet the meaningful use measures and reporting accurately on the data generated by that EHR. 

(If you have been audited and would like to share your experience, please post a comment.)

July 30, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Medicaid EHR Incentive Attestation with Multiple Practices – Meaningful Use Monday

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Jessica Shenfeld, Esq. is the founding partner at The Law Office of Jessica Shenfeld, a boutique law firm that caters to physicians’ legal needs. She is also CEO of EHR Incentive Help, Inc., which helps physicians satisfy the Meaningful Use criteria and apply for the Medicare/Medicaid EHR Incentive benefits. For more information, visit www.jessicashenfeld.com.

A reader of this blog, a physician who worked throughout 2011 in one practice, dissolved her practice in November 2011, and immediately opened a new practice with a new Group NPI (National Provider Identifier) number the same month, November 2011. She now wants to qualify for the Medicaid EHR Incentive in 2012, but was told that she cannot do so using data from 2011 because the new practice only has two qualifying months in 2011 (November and December) and the first practice’s data is mute because it was dissolved. The issues boil down to two questions:
1) Can a closed practice’s data be used during Attestation or is the date mute?
2) Can an individual physician use patients from two different practices to satisfy the Medicaid Patient Volume requirement?

The technical answer to the first question is not straightforward – it depends on what your state says. While Medicaid is a federal program, each state is responsible for administering it and each state makes its own rules for eligibility that vary slightly. The threshold issue here is whether the applicant qualifies an Eligible Professional (“EP). Once the applicant is accepted as an EP, the state has vetted his/her eligibility and that EP’s patient data from the last calendar year can be used during Attestation. In New York, the provider described above would qualify as an Eligible Professional since continues to accept Medicaid patients. However, the final decision as to whether an individual qualifies as an EP is up to each state to decide. EP Eligibility is determined when Registration for the EHR Incentive is submitted. I recommend e-mailing your individual state representative for that answer, or just submitting the Registration and seeing whether it is accepted. Upon Registration, the physician is notified whether he or she was deemed an EP.

The answer to the second question – whether an individual physician can use patients from two different practices to satisfy the Medicaid Patient Volume requirement – is no. A provider cannot attest using two group NPI numbers. The Medicaid Patient Volume requirement imposes a threshold of 30%, calculated using a ratio where the numerator is the total number of Medicaid patient encounters over a continuous 90-day period in the most recent calendar year and the denominator is all the patient encounters over that same 90-day period. Luckily, all is not lost. Although in this case the provider cannot attest using the group’s aggregate patient volume, she has the option of attesting using her individual provider’s patient volume. When reporting on her individual data, the 90-day period can consist of 90 days from the first practice, or 90 days that span across both practices if there was no break in time between the two practices.

One final point – even if a provider applying for the Medicaid EHR Incentive is not deemed an EP in 2012, that provider can delay Registration to as late as 2016 without incurring any reduction in the incentive payment. Conversely, applicants for the Medicare EHR Incentive payment must attest by 2013 using data from a 90-day period in 2012 in order to receive the full benefit.

June 18, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

MU Attestation: Save Your Documentation – Meaningful Use Monday

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Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

The end of March will likely bring a host of meaningful use attestations as the first 90-day period in 2012 draws to a close. Before you sit back and wait for your check, make sure that you assemble all the documentation that supports the information you provide to CMS. There will be provider audits, and EPs who cannot back up their attestation could forfeit their incentive payments. Documentation can be in paper or electronic format, and should be retained for 6 years. 

CMS does not specify all the necessary documentation, so the following are some suggestions:

  • Your EHR’s Automated Measure Calculation report – showing the numerators and denominators for each of the meaningful use measures that are numerically based
  • Clinical quality measures report – clinical quality measures must be reported “exactly as generated as output from the certified EHR technology.”
  • Clinical decision support rule – perhaps a dated screen shot to show that a CDS rule was implemented for the reporting period
  • Evidence of your data exchange test – whether the test was successful or not
  • Documentation of the security risk analysis you conducted – what you did, deficiencies you identified, corrective actions you took
  • Your test of the ability to submit immunization data and/or syndromic surveillance data – either proof that you conducted the test or documentation that the registry/public health agency cannot electronically accept the data (if you claim that exclusion)
  • The actual Patient List you generated (if you selected this menu measure)

 For more information, see the CMS website.

March 26, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Predicting a 6 Month Rush to EHR Starting August 2012

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As I look forward to EHR in the year 2012, it was suggested to me at HIMSS that we’re going to see an EHR adoption rush starting in August 2012. If you think about the timeline and all the other EHR happenings, I think this very much will be the case.

I saw a tweet (which I can’t find now) which said something to the effect of meaningful use attestation in January of 2012 was as big as all of 2011. I also have read about the mass of meaningful use attestation that happened at the end of 2011. With only having to attest for 90 days it makes sense why so many people waited until the end of 2011 to attest to meaningful use.

I expect we’re going to see the same rush to meaningful use attesation in 2012 as well. However, you don’t just implement and EHR and then start your meaningful use attestation the week after you implement an EHR. In most cases, you need at least a couple months (more in the hospital case) after implementing an EHR to “get your feet under you” and be ready to concern yourself with the meaningful use requirements.

With this in mind, I expect these next 3 months will be critical for EHR vendors that want to fill their Fall EHR sales pipeline. EHR adoption will slow down a bit during summer when doctors head out on vacations. Then, Fall 2012 will start the rush of EHR adoption in order to meet meaningful use requirements in 2012.

Of course, it’s also likely that many doctors will procrastinate their EHR selection process. They’ll wait until Fall and then rush through EHR selection. I think this would be a real tragedy for EHR since selecting the right EHR is the mot important part of the EHR implementation.

March 15, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

More Meaningful Use Stage 1 Numbers from 2011

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In a previous Meaningful Use Monday we wrote about a bunch of the Meaningful Use 2011 statistics that were put out by ONC and CMS. I know that my readers love statistics and information about Meaningful Use. Carl Bergman sent me a PDF file that contained some really interesting data on Meaningful Use stage 1 in 2011. The first pages we basically covered in the previous post, but starting on about page 10 or so there are some more detailed numbers.

Take a look at let us know which numbers you find interesting and/or unique.


February 3, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.