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Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level

Posted on August 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, we’ve been doing an ongoing series of Healthcare Scene Interviews where we talk to top leaders in healthcare IT. They’ve been a huge success and we just passed our 50th video interview. If you’ve attended one of our live interviews, you know that we grew quite fond of the Blab platform that we used to host these interviews. Unfortunately, we just got word that Blab has been shutdown. It was a sad day, but we still have options.

While we loved Blab, we use to do our interviews on Google Hangouts and so we’re planning to go back there again to keep bringing you great content and discussion about the challenges that face Healthcare IT. Plus, Google Hangouts has been merged into YouTube Live and that brings some great opportunities for those watching both the live and recorded version at home including being able to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube.

With that as background, I’m excited to announce our next Healthcare interview happening Friday August 19, 2016 at 11:30 AM ET (8:30 AM PT) where we’ll be talking about “Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level.” This is an extremely important and challenging topic, but we’ve lined up a number of incredible experts to take part in our discussion as you’ll see below:

Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level-Headshots

You can watch the interview live and even join in the conversation in the chat on the sidebar by watching on the Healthcare Scene YouTube page or the embedded video below:


(You’ll have to visit the YouTube page to see the live chat since the embed doesn’t include the chat.)

We look forward to learning about healthcare communication from this panel of experts. Please join us and offer your own insights in the chat or ask these amazing panelists your most challenging questions.

Be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube to be updated on our future interviews or watch our archive of past Healthcare Scene Interviews.

Dropout Docs – The Answer for #HealthIT Startups?

Posted on July 23, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media, you probably know Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr. Colin is also head of Marketing for @PatientPrompt, a product offered by Stericycle Communication Solutions. We look forward to many posts from Colin in the future.

Recently both Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1) and Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro) shared a link to an interesting article via Facebook. “Dropout Docs: Bay Area Doctors Quit Medicine to Work for Digital Health Startups”.
Dropout Doctors - Bay Area Doctors Leave Medicine for Healthcare Startups
The article highlights a new phenomenon happening In the Bay area – would-be doctors are dropping out of prestigious medical schools to pursue careers in digital health. Even those that complete their schooling are opting to join digital health start-ups/incubators (like Rock Health located in San Francisco, very close to USCF Medical Center) rather than apply for residency.

Being a doctor or a surgeon was once the pinnacle of achievement in American society, but with changes to reimbursements and general healthcare frustration, many are not seeing the practice of medicine as the rosy utopia it used to be (or was it ever?). Now even physicians are succumbing to the siren call of #HealthIT where there is a chance to “do good” and make a difference on a large scale.

I believe this trend could be a good thing for #HealthIT. Having more peers who are enthusiastic and passionate about improving healthcare can lead to more positive innovations. Consider the following quote from a doctor who joined a health care company instead of practicing medicine (from the KQED article):

“I realized that the system isn’t designed for doctors to make the real change you would like to for the patient.”

Having more people who want to put the patient at the center of healthcare makes my #HealthIT heart race. You can’t teach people to have this inner fire. It is something that is intrinsic to the individual…and we need more peers in #HealthIT with this flame.

There is just one line from the article that don’t agree with:

“…dropout doctors are well-positioned for a career in digital health as they have an insider’s view of the industry – and ideas about how to fix it.”

I think it is a bit of a stretch to say that people who went through med-school have a true “insider’s view”. Having not worked in a practice or in a healthcare setting, they would not be familiar with the political, financial or workflow aspects of care on the front lines. I hope these doc-dropouts are humble enough to remain open-minded as they listen to real-life customers provide feedback on the technologies and solutions they are involved with. In fact, dropout docs would be well served by remembering one particular part of their medical training – truly listening to the patient – which in this case may be the entirety of healthcare.

Interview with Dell’s New Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Nick van Terheyden

Posted on July 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Long time readers will know that we’ve regularly done videos with Dr. Nick (@DrNic1). He’s one of my favorite people to sit down with and talk healthcare IT. I first met Dr. Nick when he was CMO of MModal, but our relationship really flourished when he was CMO at Nuance and we shared a cab together to the airport at one of the healthcare IT conferences. Ever since then I’ve counted him a good friend and someone I enjoyed talking about anything healthcare IT related. The beauty with Dr. Nick is that you can go pretty deep with him on any science and technology topic.

With this in mind, I was excited to hear that Dr. Nick was just announced as Dell Healthcare & Life Sciences new Chief Medical Officer (CMO). Dell has a really large healthcare practice thanks to their acquisition of Perot Systems and a number of other acquisitions. Dell will be lucky to have Dr. Nick on their team.

As part of the announcement, I did a short interview with Dr. Nick (see below) to talk about what excited him about the opportunity to work at Dell and the place social media played in his hire. We’ll let Dr. Nick get a few months under his belt at Dell and then I’m sure I’ll have him on for another live G+ video hangout as well.
Dr Nick - CMO at Dell Healthcare
What excited you about Dell that inspired you to switch jobs and become CMO of Dell?
This was such an exciting opportunity with a dynamic company that has a big focus on healthcare that starts at the top with Michael Dell and traverses all the way through the organization that has assembled an outstanding collection of technology, resources but above all talented people that are dedicated to solving the issues we face in healthcare. When I looked at the breadth of what Dell could offer its customers, paired with amazing talent, it felt like a perfect match and one that offered me personally an incredible opportunity to have a positive impact on healthcare delivery systems around the world.

You’re only a few days on the job, but as you’ve gone through the process are their misconceptions about Dell that you now realize that aren’t true?
Yes. Of course the first thought everyone has is that Dell is a PC and hardware company and while this remains a major part of the organization, they have also received the ranking of number one provider of healthcare services in the world by Gartner! That position was achieved by assembling a first class talented team that have a wide range of skills and deep industry knowledge that is broader than healthcare and taps into the success and knowledgeable from many other vertical markets and industries. As one of the healthcare interoperability experts shared with me “I’ve been making systems talk to each other that aren’t supposed to for 20+ years”. His passion is achieving that goal to free data from the confines of individual systems and is typical of the skills and passion of the people working here. Interoperability is a major focus area for healthcare systems and rightly subject to significant scrutiny and pressure form regulatory bodies – working side by side people who come from other industries and bring new ideas and an urgency to solving problems is exhilarating for me. Tie that to a Unified Clinical Cloud archive that has over 9 Billion images today stored for customers designed to allow frictionless sharing of images and you can see this is an organization that can offer solutions to some of the most fundamental and pressing issues we face today

As Michael Dell puts it: Technology has always been about enabling human potential

And this is especially true in medicine where we have struggled to maintain the physician patient interaction that is the central tenet of good care. Clinicians want to focus on the patient and not the technology and that’s what the patients want too – they like the technology but not when it intrudes on their personal relationship with the doctor. This is one of the key drivers at Dell throughout their business and I’m excited to be bringing this to healthcare

You and Dell have both been doing a lot more work with healthcare internationally. What excites you about healthcare IT internationally?
Healthcare is personal for all of us and this is true worldwide. The problems and success we have here in the US are similar to those in other countries but colored by local customs, historical differences in building out healthcare in the country and varying levels of resources. We stand to learn so much from each other, learning from mistakes and benefiting from each other’s successes. I have had the privilege and fortune of working in many countries and am always amazed at the ingenuity and resourcefulness applied with pragmatic solutions that offer useful insights that can be applied elsewhere. Dell has huge presence in so many countries and markets that is combined with a brand name recognition that offers remarkable scope to share our knowledge and experiences around the world and for me personally the opportunity to learn from them and gather market insights from the widest stet of stake holders to guide our future direction.

It seems like Dell has hired some real social media rockstars starting with @MandiBPro and now you.  How do you think your social presence impacted your hire for good or bad?
Dell has been a stand out for me in Social Media – so much so I called them out in my presentation at HIMSS15: MasterChef in Healthcare – Integrating Social Media as a company demonstrating the value of social media engagement and showing others how to effectively capitalize on this untapped resource.

My social media activity has opened so many doors for me and was an important factor in landing the job at Dell and a positive aspect that attracted me to working at the company. Social media has allowed me to stay connected to people, learn a ton from others and build a community online that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to reach.

I could not be more excited to be joining an incredible pioneer, mentor and innovator in healthcare social media @MandiBPro. I’m excited to be here at Dell to see how they do it and learn from the experts and at the same time share my own thoughts and ideas around the value and contribution I think this medium can have to doctors, health systems and patients.

Are you excited to be working with someone as passionate as Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro)?
Who wouldn’t be – Mandi is such an inspiration and so much fun to be around online and IRL. Now I get to hang out with her more often and with more learning opportunities. Her drive, insights and positive energy is infectious. In fact it was one of her many posts talking about how excited she was working at Dell that were instrumental in steering me towards the company and this role.

How would you describe your job duties as CMO at Dell?  Will we still see you around at all the major conferences?
You bet – I will be present at many of the major conferences sharing the Dell vision and strategy and helping get the message out that Dell is the partner to be working with helping you navigate the challenging waters in healthcare. I will be responsible for providing strategic insight to help Dell advance its support of healthcare organizations, medical professionals and patients through information-enabled healthcare and working with our clients gathering insights and direction and helping them navigate clinical issues and applying innovative solutions in an increasingly complex healthcare industry.

What would you describes as Dell’s top healthcare initiatives?
Dell has a wide range of services that span EHR Application Services, Strategy Consulting, Integration/Interoperability, Imaging, Revenue Cycle, Cloud Based secure storage and Business Intelligence and Analytics

But it extends to new and emerging areas that include Patient Engagement, social media and mobility and includes the FDA-approved personalized medicine clinical trial for pediatric cancer and work on a genomics cloud storage and analysis system.

The wow for me was that Dell already has a vast amount of products, solutions and data along with insights that they are already integrating across multiple platforms. I can’t wait to share more on some of the projects the Dell team are working on soon.

Assuming I’m invited back to another Dell Healthcare Think Tank, describe what it will be like having Mandi, you, and me on the same panel. #DoMoreHIT
It’s like plutonium – separately plutonium is interesting, produces some interesting and exciting results and has some fascinating properties….but when you put enough of it together you get something huge and impressive. Sharing the stage and building on each other’s strengths, insights, energy and enthusiasm will be an electrifying session.

Healthcare: Prescribing a Hot Meal or Heating for Your House

Posted on March 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When we think of healthcare, we often think of the doctors office or a hospital. We’ve talked many times before how doctors and hospitals today are really about sick care and not health care. If we were really worried about caring for the health of patients, we’d need to do so much more outside of the 4 walls of a doctor’s office or hospital. In fact, we know that it’s the 99% of time at home, work, etc that most influences our health.

With this as background, I was fascinated by this HP article which talks about a new kind of Big Data for healthcare. The article interviews Rebecca Onie, Co-Founder of Health Leads. This excerpt from the article describes the problem they’re trying to solve:

The work was borne out of conversations with physicians who professed profound frustration with delivering care to vulnerable patients. Patients would come into the clinic on a regular basis, and let’s say a kid has an ear infection. A physician can prescribe antibiotics, but the real issue is that there’s no food at home or they’re living in a car. Ninety percent of health outcomes are actually not dictated by clinical healthcare but by these other factors.

Doctors told me, “We don’t ask about these issues, because there’s nothing we can do. We know [healthful food] will have a more profound impact on our patients than anything we’re going to do in the next 13 minutes inside the four walls of the doctor’s office.”

I had a similar conversation with Mandi Bishop, Health Plan Analytics Innovation & Consulting Solutions Owner at Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences, when we were chatting at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event. She highlighted to me how payers are now looking at how they can pay for ramps in people’s homes in order to help reduce the number of falls that occur.

I love how these simple ideas are so powerful. Obviously, the doctor who treats a person’s cough and cold isn’t very effective if that person goes back to a house which has no heat. We’re treating the symptom, not the problem. We can take care of the broken bones, bruises and other damage that comes from falls, or we could spend much less money preventing the falls by putting in a ramp at someone’s house.

We all intellectually understand why these changes should happen. However, there’s a massive challenge in being able to actually execute these programs. No payer wants to build out the “ramp building” capabilities that are needed to solve this problem. No doctor wants to be calling the utility companies to make sure that someone’s heat gets turned back on. However, they could partner with organizations like Health Leads to get this accomplished.

I know I’m still chewing on this idea. It’s absolutely expanded my thinking when it comes to healthcare and how we can really improve health. I hope it does the same for you. I also love describing it as a prescription for heat or a prescribing a hot meal. Maybe that’s corruption of the word prescription, but it definitely illustrates the idea so well.

Which EHR vendor is going to build in this new subscription service? Yeah, that’s right. None of them. Thus why the EHR vendor needs to open up the kimono for other people to deliver this type of service on top of the EHR platform.

Comprehensive Patient View, Social Media Time, and Linking Millions of EMR

Posted on August 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


You don’t really need to click on the link above. The answer is no. The answer is that it probably won’t ever happen. There are just too many source systems where our health data is stored and it’s getting more complicated, not less.


If the social media maven Mandi has a challenge getting her social media on, now you can understand why many others “don’t have the time.” It takes a commitment and many don’t want to make that commitment. It doesn’t make them bad people. We all only have so many hours in a day.


No need to read this link either. Although, I found it great that they described the challenge as linking millions of EMR. Let’s be generous and say there are 700 EHR vendors. Unfortunately, that doesn’t describe what it takes to make EMR interoperable. To use a cliche phrase, if you’ve connected with one Epic installation, you’ve connected with one Epic installation. I know it’s getting better, but it’s not there. If you want interoperable EMR data, you need to connect a lot of different installs.

Support Health Code-A-Palooza Team and Our Very Own Mandi Bishop

Posted on May 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m sure that many of you have enjoyed the writings of Mandi Bishop (maybe more famously known as @mandibpro on Twitter). I feel lucky to have her amazing insights on this blog. I’m also really excited for Mandi, because her and her team are competing in the Code-A-Palooza competition that’s part of the Health Datapalooza events in Washington DC. You know that Mandi’s a true data geek when she compares her participation in the event like the Oscars where “it’s an honor to have been nominated.”

What’s most important is that Mandi and her team (Lauren Still and Nick Kypreos) need your help and support. They’ve created a MedStartr crowdfunding campaign where you can get access to their work and support their efforts. Obviously, it’s not cheap for an independent team like them to compete in the challenge.

They have to be specifically vague in what they’re doing per the Code-A-Palooza rules, but here’s the description of the project they’re working on:

There is no simple solution to find out whether Medicare coverage is available and accepted for YOUR specific healthcare needs wherever and whenever you wish to go. Team ForiDUH is designing a product to make healthcare as accessible as GPS. We need your help to get to Washington, DC and win the Health Data Consortium’s Code-A-Palooza! [all donations are tax deductible!]

I’ve actually seen a preview of their presentation and their solution and it’s a pretty slick idea and use of the Medicare data. While still pretty vague, I think this slide illustrates their solution pretty well and how it can be useful to patients and health systems:
cell_4_1

Check out more details on what they’re doing and support their work on the Team ForiDUH MedStartr page.